Quiero Bailar (song)

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"Quiero Bailar"
Single by Ivy Queen
from the album Diva: Platinum Edition
Released August 2003
Format Airplay
Recorded 2002
Genre Reggaetón
Length 3:03
Label Universal Music Latino
Writer(s) Martha Ivellise Pesante
Producer(s) Iván Joy
Ivy Queen singles chronology
"In The Zone"
(1999)
"Quiero Bailar"
(2003)
"Quiero Saber"
(2004)
Music sample
A 25 second sample of "Quiero Bailar" featuring the chorus and part of Ivy Queen's first verse.

"Quiero Bailar" or "Yo Quiero Bailar" (English: "I Want To Dance") is a song by Puerto Rican reggaetón recording artist Ivy Queen, from the platinum edition of her third studio album, Diva (2003). It was composed by Queen, produced by Iván Joy and released as the lead single from the album in 2004. It is the follow up to her debut single "In The Zone" which features Wyclef Jean. Lyrically, "the song talks about a guy expecting sex after a dance like it was a bad thing."[1]

The song along with the album Diva are considered to be an important factor to reggaeton's mainstream exposure in 2004 alongside Daddy Yankee's Barrio Fino and Tego Calderon's El Enemy de los Guasibiri.[2] The song became the first Spanish-language song to reach #1 on Miami's WPOW Rhythmic Top 40 while reaching the Top 10 of the Billboard Latin Rhythm Airplay chart. An accompanying music video was filmed for the song. It features cameos from her ex-husband Omar Navarro, known artistically as Gran Omar. Ivy Queen performed the song as a part of the set of her 2008 World Tour which was held from the José Miguel Agrelot Coliseum in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Background[edit]

After the failed commercial success of Ivy Queen's first two studio albums, En Mi Imperio (1997) and The Original Rude Girl (1998) Queen was dropped from the Sony label and took a hiatus from her musical career in 1999.[3] Though the moderate hit, "In The Zone" with Wyclef Jean was able to chart in the United States, the unsuccessful second single "Ritmo Latino" and the album The Original Rude Girl were not and were overlooked and soon forgotten.[3][4] However, it was critically acclaimed by many including an editor for Allmusic who awarded the album four out of five stars and listed it as an selected "Allmusic Pick".[5][6] This occurred after she left Sony and "stepped out of Wyclef Jean's shadow".[6]

In 2001 and 2002, Queen began appearing on reggaeton compilation albums spawning hits like "Quiero Bailar" which is originally from The Majestic 2 and "Quiero Saber" from Kilates. In 2003, Queen and her then-husband Gran Omar signed with Real Music, an independent label based in Miami, Florida and established by Jorge Guadalupe and Anthony Pérez.[3] They appeared on the label's first album Jams Vol. 1 which Pérez released after several major record labels turn him down. She benefited from Pérez producing the important reggaetón television show "The Roof", which aired on mun2 and detailed urban music and lifestyle by frequently appearing and performing on the show.[3][7] After the success of her third studio album Diva (2003), which would be certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), Ivy Queen released a platinum edition to the album in 2004 with bonus tracks, of those included are "Quiero Bailar" and the singles "Quiero Saber", "Papi Te Quiero" and "Tu No Puedes".[8][9]

Composition[edit]

"Quiero Bailar" was written by Ivy Queen.[10] It was produced by the Puerto Rican reggaetón producer Iván Joy, who also produced "Quiero Saber". Originally featured on Iván Joy's reggaetón compilation album, The Majestic (2002), the song was also later included on Queen's fifth studio album, Flashback (2005) and second compilation album, Reggaeton Queen (2006) and first EP, e5 (2006).[11]

The song incorporates the Liquid riddim, a musical riddim produced by the "Jamaican cross-over guru" Jeremy Harding.[12] The song's lyrics warn her dance partner not to misinterpret her moves.[13] In the song, she berates a lover who thinks that just because they dance she is automatically going to bed with him.[14]

Release and chart performance[edit]

"Quiero Bailar" was released in 2003 as the lead single from the album by Universal Music Latino followed by five more singles.[15] On the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart, the song debuted at #35 for the week of September 3, 2005, becoming the "Hot Shot Debut" of the week and peaked at #29 for the week of September 17, 2005.[16][17] Billboard Latin Rhythm Songs chart, the song peaked at #8.[18] On the Billboard Tropical Songs chart, the song debuted under the name "Yo Quiero Bailar" at #37 on the week of December 20, 2003 and peaked at #24 for the of January 17, 2004.[19][20]

It re-entered the Billboard Tropical Songs chart under the name "Quiero Bailar" at #36 on the week of March 6, 2004 and peaked at #16 on the week of July 9, 2005.[21][22] The song became the first Spanish-language track to reach #1 on Miami's WPOW Rhythmic Top 40, an American radio station based in Miami, Florida that does not usually play Spanish music.[23] "I've worked very hard in my career, but I get surprised because I've never expected to get to these places."[23] Ivy Queen said. "When I read Sony's reports and they tell me my albums are being heard in London and my song is #1, I get surprised and look for explanations."[23]

Critical reception and cover versions[edit]

Ivy Queen in the music video for "Quiero Bailar" in which Gran Omar also appears.

Jonathan Widran of Allmusic described the track as a song that "gets the party and people moving" and as well as being one of Ivy Queen's hits.[24] Ramiro Burr of Billboard stated that "Quiero Bailar" shows how effortlessly and quickly she alternately sings and raps, claiming that she has a distinct vocal style that evokes Gwen Stefani.[25] Kid Curry, program director of the Rhythmic Top 40 WPOW (Power 96) radio station, cites Ivy Queen's release of "Yo Quiero Bailar" as "the last reggaetón super-hit".[26]

"Quiero Bailar" was covered by Puerto Rican rapper Dlaklle on the reggaetón compilation album Reggaetón 30 Pegaditas (2005).[27] Recording artist Abaya covered "Quiero Bailar" on the album Evolución Urbana (2005).[28] Boricua Boys also included their rendition of the song on their second album Reggaetón (2006).[29]

Tracklisting[edit]

  1. "Quiero Bailar" — 3:06
  • Extended Play (EP)[11]
  1. "Cuéntale" — 3:22
  2. "Libertad" — 3:29
  3. "Te He Querido, Te He Llorado" — 4:17
  4. "Quiero Bailar" — 3:03
  5. "Quiero Saber" — 2:51

Charts[edit]

Chart (2005) Peak
Position
US Hot Latin Songs (Billboard)[17] 29
US Latin Tropical Airplay (Billboard)[22] 16
US Latin Rhythm Airplay (Billboard)[18] 8

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Exploring Reggaeton: Part 6, Machisimo versus Feminine Ideal, Ivy Queen in a Male-Dominated Genre". Epinions. Shopping.com Inc. 2006-08-01. Retrieved 2012-11-29. 
  2. ^ Carney Smith, Jessie. Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture. ABC-CLIO, 2010, p. 1199.
  3. ^ a b c d Newman, Melinda (2004-03-06). "Reggaetón Acts Rise Up On Indie Labels". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-12-08. 
  4. ^ Lannert, John (1999-03-24). "Ivy Queen Zones With 'Clef". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-12-08. 
  5. ^ "The Original Rude Girl - Ivy Queen : Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards : Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2012-12-08. 
  6. ^ a b "Ivy Queen - Diva CD Album". CD Universe. Muze Inc. Retrieved 2013-03-02. 
  7. ^ "The Roof Performance: Dile by Ivy Queen". Yahoo Music. Yahoo Inc. Retrieved 2013-02-14. 
  8. ^ "American album certifications - Ivy Queen - Diva". Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click Type, then select Latin, then click SEARCH. Retrieved 2012-12-05. 
  9. ^ Cobo, Leila (2004-01-31). "BMG U.S. Latin Makes Cuts; Sirius Gets Serious". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-12-05. 
  10. ^ Muñiz Ortiz, Jorge (2010-07-08). "Ivy Queen asegura vivir doble vida entre el rechazo al maltrato y la música" (in Spanish). El Nuevo Diario. Retrieved 2012-11-24. 
  11. ^ a b "e5 - Ivy Queen : Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards : Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 
  12. ^ Román, Miriam Jiménez. Flores, Juan. The Afro-Latin@ Reader: History and Culture in the United States. Duke University Press, 2010, p. 401.
  13. ^ Ben-Yehuda, Ayala (2007-03-31). "Reggaetón Royalty - Ivy Queen Earns Her Crown As A Very Male Subgenre's Only Female Star". Billboard. Retrieved 2012-11-29. 
  14. ^ "Ivy Queen Interview". Batanga. 2006. Retrieved 2013-01-07. (subscription required)
  15. ^ "Amazon.com: Quiero Bailar: Ivy Queen: Official Music". Amazon. Amazon.com, Inc. Retrieved 2012-11-24. 
  16. ^ "Hot Latin Songs 2005-09-03". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-11-24. (subscription required)
  17. ^ a b "Hot Latin Songs 2005-09-17". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-11-24. (subscription required)
  18. ^ a b "Latin Rhythm Airplay 2005-10-29". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-11-24. (subscription required)
  19. ^ "Latin Tropical Airplay 2003-12-20". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-11-16. (subscription required)
  20. ^ "Latin Tropical Airplay 2004-01-17". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-11-16. (subscription required)
  21. ^ "Latin Tropical Airplay 2004-03-06". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-11-24. (subscription required)
  22. ^ a b "Latin Tropical Airplay 2005-07-09". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-11-24. (subscription required)
  23. ^ a b c "Ivy Queen se lanza a conquistar el mercado inglés". Caracol Radio (in Spanish). Caracol S.A. 2003-11-11. Retrieved 2012-12-07. 
  24. ^ "Flashback - Ivy Queen : Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards : AllMusic". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2012-11-29. 
  25. ^ Burr, Ramiro. "The Faces of Urban Regional". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  26. ^ Cobo, Leila. "Daddy Yankee's "Gasolina" Fires Up The Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2012-12-07. 
  27. ^ "Reggaetón 30 Pegaditas - Abaya, Dlaklle, Reggaeson, Ritmo Mix: Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards: Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  28. ^ "Evolución Urbana - Various Artist: Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards: Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  29. ^ "Reggaetón - Boricua Boys: Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards: Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  30. ^ "Diva - Ivy Queen : Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards : Allmusic". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-01-01.