Quinnipiac Meadows

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Quinnipiac Meadows, also known as Bishop Woods, is a neighborhood in the northeast corner of the city of New Haven, Connecticut located east of the Quinnipiac River and north of Fair Haven and Fair Haven Heights.[1] It contains a considerable wetlands area which is a nature preserve. There is also a dump nicknamed "Mt. Trashmore." The area is bordered on the north by the town of North Haven, on the east by the town of East Haven, on the south by Route 80, on the southwest by Interstate 91 (between Exits 7 and 8), and on the west by the Amtrak railroad tracks (along the banks of the Quinnipiac River). The portion of the area west of I-91 is also part of the community known as Cedar Hill.

Notable sites[edit]

  • Quinnipiac River
  • Ross/Woodward School (formerly Betsy Ross Arts Magnet School or B.R.A.M.S.)

List of streets[edit]

Street Origin of name Other
Assumption St. Assumption Palmieri, wife of Francesco Palmieri, area developer
Barnes Ave. Herbert Barnes, landowner previously Davenport St. for John Davenport
Blue Cliff Ter. blue cliffs of trap rock around the property although there is also red in the rock, landowner Richard Turcio felt the blue name had more "class"
Clifton St. probably Clifton, Massachusetts previously called Hill St.
Cranston St. named for Cranston, Rhode Island by developer Everett C. Wells
Cross St. used as a crossover from the Middletown Turnpike to Foxon Hill Rd via Smith Ave.
Daniel Dr. probably Daniel Dellisola, nephew of landowner Thomas Dellisola
Dell Dr. the Dellisola family, landowners
Donna Dr. Donna Turcio, daughter of developer Richard Turcio
Dump Rd. proximity to landfill
Eastern St. named for its location previously East St. and Easton St.; becomes Laurel Rd. past the East Haven town line
Ellis St. possibly Frank R. Ellis, New Haven Police Dept. detective previously Richard St. for landowner
Emily Rd. Emily Kohary, daughter of Gustave Kohary of the Kohary Construction Company
Fiore St. Fiore Palmieri, name of father and son of Francesco Palmieri, Wooster Square community leader
Flint St. probably Richard Flint, landowner
Foxon Blvd./Foxon Rd./Rt. 80 Quinnipiack Native American sagamore resident, Foxon previously North St.
Foxon Hill Rd. ibid
Gando Dr. Gando Manufacturing Co., radiator makers
Glen Haven Rd. path through a secluded, narrow valley
Hawthorne Rd. Hawthorn shrub; intended to be a "high-class" name by a New York developer
Hemingway Pl. the prominent 19th century Hemingway family of the area
Kenny Dr. Kenneth G. Kohary, son of Gustave Kohary of the Kohary Construction Company
Melrose Dr. intended to give the street "a little class" by a New York developer
Middletown Ave. Middletown, Connecticut
Newport St. named for Newport, Rhode Island by developer Everett C. Wells
Norwood Rd. intended as a "fancy" name by a New York developer
Oak Ridge Dr. formerly plentiful oak trees
Palmieri Ave. by and for Frank A. Palmieri, landowner
Pawtucket St. named for Pawtucket, Rhode Island by developer Everett C. Wells
Portland St. probably named for Portland St. in Providence, Rhode Island by developer Everett C. Wells
Providence St. named for Providence, Rhode Island by developer Everett C. Wells
Quinnipiac Ave./Rt. 103 Quinnipiack Native Americans
Quinnipiac Ct. ibid
Roosevelt St./Roosevelt St. Ext. Franklin D. Roosevelt, 31st U.S. President
Scarboro St. unknown
Smith Ave. Sibyl Smith, homeowner
St. Anthony St. Anthony the Great
Sunset Rdg. likely for the view
Westminster St. probably named for Westminster St. in Providence, Rhode Island by developer Everett C. Wells
Weybosset St. named for Weybosset St. in Providence, Rhode Island by developer Everett C. Wells

Bibliography[edit]

Print[edit]

  • The Streets of New Haven - The Origin of Their Names, 2nd edition 1998 ISBN 0-943143-02-0

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°19′30″N 72°52′37″W / 41.325°N 72.877°W / 41.325; -72.877