Quintana Roo

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This article is about the Mexican state. For other uses, see Quintana Roo (disambiguation).
Quintana Roo
State
Estado Libre y Soberano de Quintana Roo
Flag of Quintana Roo
Flag
Official seal of Quintana Roo
Seal
Anthem: Himno a Quintana Roo
State of Quintana Roo within Mexico
State of Quintana Roo within Mexico
Coordinates: 19°36′N 87°55′W / 19.600°N 87.917°W / 19.600; -87.917Coordinates: 19°36′N 87°55′W / 19.600°N 87.917°W / 19.600; -87.917
Country Mexico
Capital Chetumal
Largest City Cancún
Municipalities 10
Admission October 8, 1974[1]
Order 30th
Government
 • Governor Roberto Borge PRI
 • Parliament Congress of Quintana Roo
 • Senators[2] Pedro Joaquín PRI
Ludivina Menchaca PVEM
José Luis García PRD
 • Deputies[3]
Area[4]
 • Total 44,705 km2 (17,261 sq mi)
  Ranked 19th
Highest elevation[5] 230 m (750 ft)
Population (2013)[6]
 • Total 1,468,469
 • Rank 26th
 • Density 33/km2 (85/sq mi)
 • Density rank 24th
Demonym Quintanarroense
Time zone CST (UTC−6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC−5)
Postal code 77
Area code
ISO 3166 code MX-ROO
HDI Increase 0.759 high Ranked 11th
GDP US$ 10,286,552.031 th[a]
Website qroo.gob.mx
^ a. The state's GDP was $131,667,866 thousand of pesos in 2008,[5] amount corresponding to $10,286,552.031 thousand of dollars, being a dollar worth 12.80 pesos (value of June 3, 2010).[7]

Quintana Roo (Spanish pronunciation: [kinˈtana ˈro]), officially Free and Sovereign State of Quintana Roo (Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Quintana Roo), is one of the 31 states which, with the Federal District, comprise the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. It is divided in 10 municipalities and its capital city is Chetumal.

It is located in Southeastern Mexico, on the eastern part of the Yucatán Peninsula. It is bordered by the states of Yucatán to the northwest and Campeche to the west. To the north and east, Quintana Roo borders the Caribbean Sea and to the south, Belize. It also claims territory which gives it a small border with Guatemala in the southwest of the state, although this disputed area is also claimed by Campeche.

Quintana Roo is home of the world famous city of Cancún, the islands of Cozumel and Isla Mujeres, the towns of Bacalar, Playa del Carmen and Akumal, as well as the ancient Maya ruins of Chacchoben, Coba, Kohunlich, Muyil, Tulum, Xel-Há, and Xcaret. The Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve is also in the state.

The state officially covers an area of 44,705 square kilometers (17,261 sq mi), but since 1997 there is a boundary dispute with the states of Yucatán and Campeche over an area of approximately 10,200 square kilometers (3,900 sq mi).[8][9]

The statewide population is expanding at a rapid rate due to the construction of hotels and the demand for workers. Many immigrants come from Yucatán, Campeche, Tabasco, and Veracruz. The state is frequently hit by severe hurricanes due to its exposed location, the most recent and severe being Hurricane Dean in 2007, making landfall with sustained winds of 280 km/h (175 mph), with gusts up to 320 km/h (200 mph).

History[edit]

Tulum ruins

The area that makes up modern Quintana Roo was long part of Yucatán, sharing its history. With the Caste War of Yucatán starting in the 1840s, all non-natives were driven from the region and the independent Maya nation of Chan Santa Cruz was centered on what is now the town of Felipe Carrillo Puerto.

Quintana Roo was made a territory of Mexico by decree of President Porfirio Díaz on November 24, 1902. It was named after an early patriot of the Mexican Republic, Andrés Quintana Roo. The Mexican army succeeded in defeating most of the Maya population of the region during the 1910s, and in 1915 the area was again declared to be legally part of the state of Yucatán.

Quintana Roo was granted statehood within the United Mexican States on October 8, 1974.[1] It is the Mexican Republic's youngest state.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1895[10] —    
1900 —    
1910 9,109 —    
1921 10,966 +20.4%
1930 10,620 −3.2%
1940 18,752 +76.6%
1950 26,967 +43.8%
1960 50,169 +86.0%
Year Pop. ±%
1970 88,150 +75.7%
1980 225,985 +156.4%
1990 493,277 +118.3%
1995 703,536 +42.6%
2000 874,963 +24.4%
2005 1,135,309 +29.8%
2010[11] 1,325,578 +16.8%

Municipalities[edit]

The State of Quintana Roo is divided into 10 municipalities (Spanish: municipios), each headed by a municipal president:[12]

Tourism, ecotourism, and globalization[edit]

Tourism[edit]

Aerial view of Cancún
Beach of Contoy Island
Beach of Punta Sur at south at the Cozumel Island

Quintana Roo's tourist boom began in the 1970s.[13] Tourism resulted in the development of coastal hotels and resorts, in addition to ecotourism inland and in coastal regions, which have increased the development of the region as well as the gross domestic product.[14] Quintana Roo ranks sixth among Mexican states according to the United Nations Human Development index (HDI).[15]

Biotic situation of the Yucatán Peninsula[edit]

The Yucatán Peninsula is one of the most forested areas of the world in terms of biotic mass per hectare.[13] However, anthropological, biological and governmental experts have determined that Quintana Roo is 'facing a faunal crisis'.[13] Many medium to large game animals are disappearing due to hunting and habitat loss. While its population is relatively small, Quintana Roo is experiencing both a population influx and an increase in tourism.[13][15] This only increases the pressure on the plants and animals native to the area.

Ecosystems and animals[edit]

There are four generalized ecosystems in Quintana Roo—tropical forests, or jungle, savanna, mangrove forests, and coral reefs. One of the byproducts of traditional and large-scale agriculture is the creation of additional habitats, such as second growth forests and fields/pastures.[16] Tourism has caused Quintana Roo to become famous around the world in the last thirty or so years for its beaches and coastline. Biological experts consider the coastline of Quintana Roo one of the best manatee habitats worldwide.[17] Queen conchs are also noted for their inhabitation of coastal territory.[17] The wide variety of biotic organisms such as these has decreased drastically in the last fifteen years.[14][18]

Avifauna[edit]

Also affected by the loss of habitat due to both agriculture and development, birds are one of the region's most varied animal assets.[13] Hundreds of species reside in Quintana Roo permanently, with hundreds of others either wintering there or using it as a stopover on the long journey into South America.[17] As a result, many birders come to the area annually in search of the rare and unexpected.[13]

Effects of tourism[edit]

Many blame the environmental damage in Quintana Roo on either the regional government or outside investors.[14] However, resorts and hotels in Quintana Roo have created jobs and increased economic activity, which in turn has resulted in growth.[14][18]

Tourism projections and the native Maya[edit]

Projections for the tourism economy of Quintana Roo were exceedingly optimistic. It houses multiple tourist attractions from the Maya ruins to the lush forests and beautiful beaches. However, the long-term effects were not foreseen. The effect on the local environment was not properly considered. Economic stresses of development and population were virtually ignored.[18] The effect on the native population was not properly considered. The 'economic marginalization' of the Maya has had drastic effects on their sense of place and identity.[14] For tourism to truly benefit the region, attention must go to both the environment[13][17][18] and the area's original occupants.

Education[edit]

Universities[edit]

Sports[edit]

The Atlante F.C. was founded in 1916 in Mexico City and they now play association football (soccer) in the Primera División de México. Their home ground (since 2007) is the Estadio Andrés Quintana Roo in Cancún.[19]

After playing the 1955–2001 seasons in Mexico City and the 2002–2005 seasons in Puebla the Quintana Roo Tigers have been playing baseball with a home field at the Estadio de Béisbol Beto Ávila in Cancún since the 2006 season.[20] The Tigers made it to the Mexican League series in 2009, but lost to the Saraperos de Saltillo 4 games to 2.[21]

Flora and fauna[edit]

Flora and fauna of Quintana Roo
FL fig04.jpg Mazama americana in Barbados Wildlife Reserve 07.jpg Hawksbill Turtle.jpg Crax rubra (Great Curassow) - male.jpg Brillenkaiman (01) 2006-09-19.JPG
Trichechus Mazama Pandora Eretmochelys imbricata Crax rubra Caiman
Ateles paniscus -Brazil-8.jpg Pivoting king vulture.jpg Tamandua mexicana.jpg Coati.jpg Boa constrictor (2).jpg
Ateles paniscus Sarcoramphus papa Tamandua mexicana Nasua Boa constrictor
Ceiba pentandra 0008.jpg Árbol de Guancaste.jpg Mangroves in Puerto Rico.JPG Haematoxylon campechianum0.jpg Bixa orellana with fruits in Hyderabad, AP W IMG 1453.jpg
Ceiba pentandra Enterolobium cyclocarpum Mangrove Haematoxylum campechianum Bixa orellana

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Poder Legislativo del Estado de Quintana Roo" (in Spanish). 
  2. ^ "Senadores por Quintana Roo LXI Legislatura". Senado de la Republica. Retrieved April 5, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Listado de Diputados por Grupo Parlamentario del Estado de Quintana Roo". Camara de Diputados. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Resumen". Cuentame INEGI. Retrieved February 12, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Relieve". Cuentame INEGI. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
  6. ^ "ENOE". Retrieved August 24, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Reporte: Jueves 3 de Junio del 2010. Cierre del peso mexicano.". www.pesomexicano.com.mx. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Controversia Constitucional: Estado de Quintana Roo Vs. Estado de Yucatán (3 de Mayo de 1997)". Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nacion. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Campeche insiste en que Quintana Roo le invadió terreno". Notisureste. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Mexico: extended population list". GeoHive. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  11. ^ "México en cifras". INEGI. Retrieved 2012-02-02. 
  12. ^ Hernández, Silvia (2 February 2011). "Bacalar, el décimo municipio de Q. Roo". El Universal. Retrieved 12 April 2011. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g Anderson, E. N. and Felix Medina Tzuc. 2005. Animals and the Maya in Southeast Mexico. University of Arizona Press. Tucson, Arizona.
  14. ^ a b c d e Daltabuit, Magali and Oriol Pi-Sunyer. 1990. Tourism Development in Quintana Roo, Mexico. Cultural Survival Quarterly 14.2, 9-13.
  15. ^ a b Encyclopædia Britannica 2008. "Quintana Roo". Encyclopædia Britannica Online. http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9062295. Retrieved February 21, 2008.
  16. ^ Villa Rojas, Alfonso. 1945. The Maya of East Central Quintana Roo. Carnegie Institute of Washington Publication 559. Washington D.C.
  17. ^ a b c d Schlesinger, Victoria. 2001. Animals and Plants of the Ancient Maya: A Guide. University of Texas Press. Austin, Texas.
  18. ^ a b c d Juarez, Ana M. 2002. "Ecological Degradation, Global Tourism, and Inequality: Maya Interpretations of the Changing Environment in Quintana Roo, Mexico. Human Organization 61.2, 113-124.
  19. ^ ":: Atlante Futbol Club ::". Retrieved 15 April 2011. 
  20. ^ ":.TIGRES DE QUINTANAROO.". Retrieved 15 April 2011. 
  21. ^ "2009 Playoffs - MiLB.com Events - The Official Site of Minor League Baseball". Retrieved 15 April 2011. 

References[edit]

  • Dumond, Don E.1985 The Talking Crosses of Yucatán: A New Look at their History. Ethnohistory 32(4):291–308.
  • Freidel, David., Schele, Linda., et al. 1993 Maya Cosmos: Three thousand years on the Shaman's Path. New York: W. Morrow
  • Harrison, Peter D. 1985 Some Aspects of Preconquest Settlement in Southern Quintana Roo, Mexico. Lowland Maya Settlement Patterns edited by Wendy Ashmore Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, A School of American Research Book.
  • Villa Rojas, Alfonso. 1945 The Maya of East Central Quintana Roo: The Pagan-Christian Religious Complex. Washington, D.C.: Carnegie Institution.

Further reading[edit]

  • Anderson, E. N. and Felix Medina Tzuc. Animals and the Maya in Southeast Mexico. University of Arizona Press. Tucson, Arizona. 2005.
  • Brannon, Jeffery T. and Gilbert M. Joseph. Eds. 1991 Land, labor & capital in modern Yucatán: essays in regional history and political economy. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.
  • Barton Bray, David, Marcelo Carreon, Leticia Merino, and Victoria Santos. "On the Road to Sustainable Forestry: The Maya of Quintana Roo are Striving to Combine Economic Efficiency, Ecological Sustainability, and a Democratic Society." Cultural Survival Quarterly 17.1, 38-41. 1993.
  • Daltabuit, Magali and Oriol Pi-Sunyer. 1990. Tourism Development in Quintana Roo, Mexico. Cultural Survival Quarterly 14.2, 9-13. http://209.200.101.189/publications/csq/csq-article.cfm?id=837
  • Dumond, Don E. 1997 The Machete and the Cross. Campesino Rebellion in Yucatán. Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press.
  • Encyclopædia Britannica 2008. Quintana Roo. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Accessed 2008-02-21.
  • Forero, Oscar A. and Michael R. Redclift. "The Role of the Mexican State in the Development of Chicle Extraction in Yucatán, and the Continuing Importance of Coyotaje." Journal of Latin American Studies 38.1, 65-93. 2006.
  • Gabbert, Wolfgang. Becoming Maya—Ethnicity and Social Inequality in Yucatán Since 1500. University of Arizona Press. Tucson, Arizona. 2004.
  • Hervik, Peter. Mayan People Within and Beyond Boundaries—Social Categories and Lived Identity in Yucatán. Harwood Academic Publishers. Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 1999.
  • Jones, Grant D. Maya Resistance to Spanish Rule—Time and History on a Colonial Frontier. University of New Mexico Press. Albuquerque, New Mexico. 1989.
  • Juarez, Ana M. 2002. "Ecological Degradation, Global Tourism, and Inequality: Maya Interpretations of the Changing Environment in Quintana Roo, Mexico". Human Organization 61.2, 113-124.
  • Morely, Sylvanus Griswold. The Ancient Maya. Stanford University Press. Stanford, California. 1947.
  • Morely, Sylvanus Griswold and George W. Brainerd. The Ancient Maya, 3rd ed. Stanford University Press. Stanford, California. 1956.
  • Pi-Sunyer, Oriol and R. Brooke Thomas. 1997. Tourism, Environmentalism, and Cultural Survival in Quintana Roo. "In" Life and Death Matters: Human Rights at the End of the Millennium. Barbara R. Johnston, ed. p. 187-212. Walnut Creek, California. Altamira Press.
  • Roys, Ralph L. The Political Geography of the Yucatán Maya. Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication 613. Washington, D. C. 1957.
  • Rugeley, Terry. 2004 "Yaxcabá and the caste war of Yucatán: An Archaeological Perspective" In Alexander, Rani T. ed. Yaxcabá and the caste war of Yucatán Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press
  • Schlesinger, Victoria. Animals and Plants of the Ancient Maya: A Guide. University of Texas Press. Austin, Texas. 2001.
  • Sharer, Robert J. The Ancient Maya, 4th ed. Stanford University Press. Stanford, California. 1983.
  • Villa Rojas, Alfonso. The Maya of East Central Quintana Roo. Carnegie Institute of Washington Publication 559. Washington, D. C. 1945.
  • Young, Peter A, ed. Secrets of the Maya. Hatherleigh Press. Long Island City, New York. 2003
  • Link to tables of population data from Census of 2005 INEGI: Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática

External links[edit]