Quique Flores

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Quique Flores
Quique Flores.JPG
Flores in 2010
Personal information
Full name Enrique Sánchez Flores
Date of birth (1965-02-05) 5 February 1965 (age 49)
Place of birth Madrid, Spain
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Playing position Right back
Youth career
Pegaso Tres Cantos
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1984–1994 Valencia 272 (23)
1994–1996 Real Madrid 63 (2)
1996–1997 Zaragoza 9 (0)
Total 344 (25)
National team
1982–1983 Spain U18 9 (0)
1984–1986 Spain U21 13 (0)
1986–1987 Spain U23 2 (0)
1987–1991 Spain 15 (0)
Teams managed
2001–2004 Real Madrid (youth)
2004–2005 Getafe
2005–2007 Valencia
2008–2009 Benfica
2009–2011 Atlético Madrid
2011–2013 Al-Ahli
2013–2014 Al-Ain
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Sánchez and the second or maternal family name is Flores.

Enrique "Quique" Sánchez Flores (born 5 February 1965) is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a right back, and a current manager.

During his 13-year professional career he played mainly for Valencia (ten seasons, nine in La Liga), retiring in 1997 and going on to have a lengthy managerial career, which included his main club.

Flores represented Spain at the 1990 World Cup.

Playing career[edit]

Born in Madrid, Flores spent his first ten years as a senior with Valencia CF, starting in 1984–85. However, his beginnings at the Mestalla Stadium were not particularly positive as the club was relegated in his second season, and when it returned to La Liga in the 1987–88 campaign, finished 14th. However, from that point until 1994 the team never ranked lower than seventh, with him as an everpresent fixture.

In the 1994 summer Flores moved to Real Madrid, and stayed with the capital side for two seasons, winning the league title in the first one. Subsequently he had a brief spell with Real Zaragoza, retiring from professional football at the age of 32 with Spanish top flight totals of 304 games and 16 goals; in his only season in Segunda División, as Valencia won the championship in 1987, he posted career-highs with 40 matches and nine goals.

Flores made 15 appearances for the Spanish national team, and was selected to the 1990 FIFA World Cup squad. His debut came on 23 September 1987 in a 2–0 friendly win against Luxembourg, in Gijón.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

Flores followed in the footsteps of one of his predecessors at Valencia, Rafael Benítez, by taking charge of Real Madrid's youth teams. After winning plaudits during his time there, he was approached about the manager's job at newly promoted Getafe CF, also in Madrid.

After an impressive 2004–05 with Getafe, which managed to finish a respectable 13th place, Flores was given the opportunity to coach former club Valencia, succeeding Claudio Ranieri. In his first season he guided the club to the third place, with the subsequent qualification to the UEFA Champions League where the team went on to reach the quarter-finals, being knocked out by Chelsea. In May 2007 the Che guaranteed a top-four league finish, and consequently a place in the next Champions League.

On 29 October 2007, the Valencia board of directors fired Flores after a string of average results with poor performances.[2] He was appointed as manager of S.L. Benfica on 24 May 2008.[3]

On 8 June 2009 Flores left Benfica through contractual termination, after a third place in the league and winning the domestic league cup.[4] On 23 October he was appointed at Atlético Madrid following the sacking of Abel Resino,[5] signing a contract until 30 June 2010.[6]

At the end of the 2009–10 campaign, Flores led Atlético to the ninth position in the domestic competition, but also to two cup finals: the UEFA Europa League against Fulham (2–1 win)[7] and the Copa del Rey, lost to Sevilla FC. Frequently clashing with star player Diego Forlán during 2010–11,[8][9] he announced his departure from the Colchoneros before the season ended, with the team finally qualifying to the Europa League.

In early May 2011, Flores was linked with a move to FC Spartak Moscow.[10] On 8 November he was named new coach of UAE Pro-League team Al Ahli Dubai, replacing Ivan Hašek.[11]

On 27 September 2013, only three months after leaving the country, Flores returned to the United Arab Emirates, being appointed at Al Ain FC.[12] He was sacked on 8 March 2014 due to poor results.[13]

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Club[edit]

Valencia
Real Madrid

Country[edit]

Spain U21

Manager[edit]

Benfica
Atlético Madrid
Al Ahli
Al Ain

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 8 March 2014.
Team From To Competition Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %
Getafe 8 July 2004 2 June 2005 La Liga 38 12 11 15 38 46 -8 31.58
Copa del Rey 4 3 0 1 6 5 +1 75.00
Total 42 15 11 16 44 51 -7 35.71
Valencia 31 May 2005 29 October 2007 La Liga 85 45 18 22 129 89 +40 52.94
Copa del Rey 8 4 2 2 11 8 +3 50.00
Europe 23 10 7 6 32 18 +14 43.48
Total 116 59 27 30 172 115 +57 50.86
Benfica 24 May 2008 8 June 2009 Primeira Liga 30 17 8 5 54 32 +22 56.67
Taça de Portugal 3 1 2 0 3 0 +3 33.33
Taça da Liga 5 4 1 0 10 3 +7 80.00
Europe 6 1 1 4 6 12 -6 16.67
Total 44 23 12 9 73 47 +26 52.27
Atlético Madrid 23 October 2009 22 May 2011 La Liga 68 29 11 28 109 96 +13 42.65
Copa del Rey 15 7 3 5 30 16 +14 46.67
Europe 18 5 9 4 23 29 -6 27.78
Other 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100.000
Total 102 42 23 37 164 141 +23 41.18
Al-Ahli 11 November 2011 11 June 2013 UAE Pro League 45 24 10 11 105 69 +36 53.33
UAE President's Cup 5 3 1 1 8 9 -1 60.00
Etisalat Emirates Cup 14 6 4 4 20 18 +2 42.86
Total 64 33 15 16 133 96 +37 51.56
Al-Ain 27 September 2013 8 March 2014 UAE Arabian Gulf League 16 6 6 4 29 17 +12 37.50
UAE President's Cup 3 2 1 0 8 4 +4 66.67
Etisalat Emirates Cup 4 2 1 1 7 6 +1 50.00
Asia 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.000
Total 24 11 8 5 46 28 +18 45.83
Career totals League 282 133 64 85 464 349 +115 47.16
Cup 38 20 9 9 66 42 +24 52.63
League Cup 23 12 6 5 37 27 +10 52.17
Europe 47 16 17 14 61 59 +2 34.04
Asia 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.000
Other 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100.000
Total 392 183 96 113 632 478 +154 46.68

Personal life[edit]

Flores is the nephew of Flamenco singer-dancer Lola Flores.[15]

His father, Isidro Sánchez García-Figueras, was also a footballer and a defender. He too played for Real Madrid, winning four leagues in his four seasons with the club.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Enrique Sánchez Flores, ‘Quique’ – International Appearances; at RSSSF
  2. ^ Valencia part with Sánchez Flores; UEFA.com, 29 October 2007
  3. ^ "Benfica appoint Flores as coach". BBC Sport. 24 May 2008. Retrieved 24 May 2008. 
  4. ^ "Official: Flores leaves Benfica". PortuGOAL. 7 June 2009. Retrieved 18 January 2011. 
  5. ^ Quique Sanchez Flores to become new Atletico Madrid coach; Goal.com, 23 October 2009
  6. ^ "Atletico make Flores appointment". Sky Sports. 23 October 2009. Retrieved 24 October 2009. 
  7. ^ McCarra, Kevin (12 May 2010). "Atlético Madrid's Diego Forlán strikes to beat Fulham in Europa League". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 13 May 2010. 
  8. ^ "Quique Sanchez Flores: Diego Forlan's situation at Atletico Madrid is similar to Zlatan Ibrahimovic at Barcelona". Goal.com. 27 April 2011. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  9. ^ "Forlan's relationship with Atlético seems damaged beyond repair". Sports Illustrated. 11 May 2011. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  10. ^ Nueva 'novia' para Quique Sánchez: el Spartak ruso (New 'bride' for Quique Sánchez: Russia's Spartak); El Mundo Deportivo, 12 May 2011 (Spanish)
  11. ^ "Quique Sanchez Flores takes over as Al Ahli boss after Ivan Hasek dismissal". Goal.com. 8 November 2011. Retrieved 8 November 2011. 
  12. ^ "Al Ain appoint Quique Flores as new head coach". UAE Pro League Committee. 28 September 2013. Retrieved 29 September 2013. 
  13. ^ Passela, Amith (8 March 2014). "Quique Sanchez Flores out at Al Ain". The National. Retrieved 11 November 2014. 
  14. ^ ¡¡¡Campeones!!! (Champions!!!); El Mundo Deportivo, 30 October 1986 (Spanish)
  15. ^ La otra cara de... Carmen Flores (The other face of... Carmen Flores); Las Provincias, 16 September 2007 (Spanish)

External links[edit]