Qutalmish

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Qutalmish (Old Anatolian Turkish: قُتَلمِش, Persian: قتلمش‎) (alternative spellings: Qutulmush, Kutalmish, Kutalmış) was the name of two different personalities in Turkish history, the first having lived in the 11th century and the second 12th century, each of whom had a son named Suleyman Shah, and whose descendants founded, respectively, the Sultanate of Rum and the Ottoman Empire.

Sultanate of Rûm[edit]

Kutalmish was the son of Arslan Yabgu and a cousin of Tughril and played a vital role in the conquests of the Seljuq Turks. He supported a rebellion against Tughril and contested the succession to the throne with Alp Arslan. According to the historian Ali ibn al-Athir, Kutalmish knew the sciences of the stars.[1] His son, Suleiman, was appointed Sultan of Rûm by Malik Shah I in 1073.

Preceded by
New Creation
Sultan of Rûm Ancestor:
Qutalmish

?–1064
Succeeded by
Suleiman

Qutalmish[edit]

The 12th century Qutalmish or Kaya Âlp was the ancestor of Osman I, founder of the Ottoman state. His son was Suleyman Shah. Kaya Âlp was the grandfather of Ertuğrul Ghazi, who was the father of Osman I, founder of the Ottoman state.

Preceded by
New Creation
Pre-Ottoman ruler:
Kaya Âlp

? – ?
Succeeded by
Suleyman Shah
Gündüz Âlp

Legacy[edit]

Kutalmış is a common masculine Turkish given name, which is used in memory of Seljuk Kutalmısh and/or Kaya Âlp.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Institutionalisation of Science in the Medreses of pre-Ottoman and Ottoman Turkey, Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, Turkish Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, Ed. Gürol Irzik and Güven Güzeldere, (Springer, 2005), 267.