Réunion women's national football team

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 Réunion
Shirt badge/Association crest
Association Ligue Réunionnaise de Football
Confederation CAF (Africa)
FIFA code REU
FIFA ranking n/a
Highest FIFA ranking n/a
Lowest FIFA ranking n/a
First colours
Second colours
First international
 Réunion 4–3 Egypt Egypt
(Saint-Paul; 30 July 2000)
Biggest win
 Réunion 3–0 Mauritius Mauritius
(Saint-Denis; 3 June 2012)
Biggest defeat
 South Africa 3–0 Réunion Réunion
(Vosloorus; 11 November 2000)

The Réunion women's national football team is the national football team of Réunion, a French island, and is not recognised by FIFA. They have played international matches against Egypt, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Uganda and Mauritius. There is a two-level women's league in the country, with promotion and relegation between each division. They have similar development issues to the rest of Africa.

History[edit]

The national team is not recognised by FIFA.[1] In 2000, they participated in the African Women's Championships. They qualified by beating Egypt women's national football team 5–4 on aggregate (winning 4–3 at home and drawing the away leg 1–1).[2] The first match at the final tournament was a 0–3 loss to South Africa women's national football team in Vosloorus. The second match they played in was a 1–2 loss to Zimbabwe women's national football team. Their final match was a 1–2 loss to Uganda women's national football team. They finished last in their group.[1][3] Members of the team who played in the tournament included Carole Keita, Lise May Ouledi, Tania Nice, Laurianne Boyer, Claure Lebon, Kelly Bello, Marie Therese Fanovana, Prisca Maraguet, Cathy Chateauroux, Nadege Grosmane, Martine Turpin, Rachelle Lecoutre, Florence Mussard. The side was coached by Patrick Honorine.[4] To date, this is the only competition in which Réunion have participated. In July 2011, there were plans to host a COSAFA Women’s Championship in Réunion.[5][6] The competition was eventually held in Zimbabwe and Réunion did not participate.[7] On 3 June 2012, Réunion recorded their biggest win to date, winning 3–0 against Mauritius, who were playing their first ever international match.[8]

The Réunion women's national under-20 football team competed in the African Women U-20 World Cup 2010 Qualifying. They beat Madagascar 3–1 away from home in the first leg, and went on to win the second leg 4–1 at home.[9]

Background and development[edit]

Early development of the women's game at the time colonial powers brought football to the continent was limited as colonial powers in the region tended to take make concepts of patriarchy and women's participation in sport with them to local cultures that had similar concepts already embedded in them.[10] The lack of later development of the national team on a wider international level symptomatic of all African teams is a result of several factors, including limited access to education, poverty amongst women in the wider society, and fundamental inequality present in the society that occasionally allows for female specific human rights abuses.[11] When quality female football players are developed, they tend to leave for greater opportunities abroad.[12] Continent wide, funding is also an issue, with most development money coming from FIFA, not the national football association.[12] Future, success for women's football in Africa is dependent on improved facilities and access by women to these facilities. Attempting to commercialise the game and make it commercially viable is not the solution, as demonstrated by the current existence of many youth and women's football camps held throughout the continent.[10]

There are local women's competitions in the country, with two levels of league competition.[13][14] At the end of the season, teams are relegated and promoted between the two divisions.[14][15][16]

The 1979 first division was won by SS Escadrille. The 1980 first division was won by SS Suédoises. The 1981 first division was won by SS Escadrille. The 1982 first division was won by SS Escadrille. The 1983 first division was won by SS Escadrille. The 1984 first division was won by SS Escadrille. The 1985 first division was won by SS Escadrille. The 1986 first division was won by Bois de Nèfles S. The 1987 first division was won by SS Escadrille.The 1988 first division was won by USS Tamponnaise. The 1989 first division was won by USS Tamponnaise. The 1990 first division was won by SS Escadrille. The 1991 first division was won by SS Jeanne d'Arc. The 1992 first division was won by SS Jeanne d'Arc. The 1993 first division was won by SS Saint Pauloise. The 1994 first division was won by CS Saint Denis. The 1995 first division was won by FF Ouest. The 1996 first division was won by Port FF. The 1997 first division was won by FF Ouest. The 1998 first division was won by Case Vauban.[14] The 1999 first division was won by Case Vauban and the second division was won by FF Chaudron.[15] The 2000 first division was won by Case Vauban. The 2001 first division was won by FF Ouest. The 2002 first division was won by Port FF. The 2003 first division was won by FF Ouest. The 2004 first division was won by FF Ouest. The 2005 first division was won by JS Saint Pierroise.[14] The 2006 first division was won by JS Saint-Pierroise and the second division was won by AS Marsouins.[16] The 2007 first division was won by AFF Est. The 2008 first division was won by AFF Est. The 2009 first division was won by ASC Ouest. The 2010 first division was won by AFF Est. The 2011 first division was won by ASC Ouest.[14] In the first division in 2010, the league championship was won AFF Est and the second division was won by OFFT who along with AS Du Plate were promoted.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Duret, Sébastien (5 November 2003). "South Africa – Women – International Results". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 1 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "Africa – Women's Championship 2000". Rsssf.com. 2008-02-14. Retrieved 2012-06-16. 
  3. ^ "Teams – African Women Championship 2010 – CAF". Cafonline.com. Retrieved 2012-06-01. 
  4. ^ "Africa – Women's Championship 2000". Rsssf.com. 2008-02-14. Retrieved 2012-06-08. 
  5. ^ "Cosafa Archive 2010". Cosafa.com. Retrieved 2012-06-01. 
  6. ^ "Malawi women’s team readies for COSAFA Championship, news, football". Star Africa. Retrieved 2012-06-08. 
  7. ^ "Cosafa Competitions". COSAFA. Retrieved 1 June 2012. 
  8. ^ "Une goutte dans l’ocйan indien – Journal de l'оle de la Rйunion". Clicanoo.re. Retrieved 2012-06-16. 
  9. ^ "African Women U-20 World Cup 2010 Qualifying". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 
  10. ^ a b Peter Alegi (2 March 2010). African Soccerscapes: How a Continent Changed the World's Game. Ohio University Press. ISBN 978-0-89680-278-0. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  11. ^ Jean Williams (15 December 2007). A Beautiful Game: International Perspectives on Women's Football. Berg. p. 186. ISBN 978-1-84520-674-1. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 
  12. ^ a b Gabriel Kuhn (24 February 2011). Soccer Vs. the State: Tackling Football and Radical Politics. PM Press. p. 34. ISBN 978-1-60486-053-5. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 
  13. ^ Saavedra, Martha; Centerfor African Studies, University of California, Berkeley (December 2007). "Women's Football in Africa" (PDF). Third Transnational Meeting on Sport and Gender, Urbino. Retrieved 17 April 2012. 
  14. ^ a b c d e Schöggl, Hans (2012-01-17). "Réunion – List of Women Champions". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 June 2012. 
  15. ^ a b Schöggl, Hans. "Réunion Women 1999". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 June 2012. 
  16. ^ a b Schöggl, Hans (2007-05-10). "Réunion Women 2006". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 5 June 2012. 
  17. ^ Schöggl, Hans (2011-06-16). "Réunion Women 2010". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 June 2012. 

External links[edit]