R110A (New York City Subway car)

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"R110A" redirects here. For the road, see Route 110.
R110A (New York City Subway car)
R130 train at East 239th Street Yard.jpg
R110A at the 239th Street Yard in the Bronx
Manufacturer Kawasaki Rail Car Company
Constructed 1992
Entered service June 15, 1993
Number built 10
Formation Five car sets or ABBBA
Fleet numbers 8001–8010
Capacity 24 (A car), 28 (B car)
Operator New York City Subway
Specifications
Car body construction Stainless steel
Car length 51 ft (15.54 m)
Width 8 ft (2.44 m)
Height 12 ft (3.66 m)
Doors 6
Traction system AEG (ADtranz) AC traction motors: Model 1501A, 150 hp (110 kW), three- phase, four-pole
Electric system(s) 625 V DC third rail
Current collection method Contact shoe
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge

The R-110A (contract R130) was a prototype class of experimental New York City Subway cars delivered in 1992. The R110A was designed to test out new technology features that would be incorporated into the R142 fleet, and it was not intended for long-term production use. Built by Kawasaki, there are ten cars, unit numbered 8001–8010, and they are permanently coupled in five-car sets.

In each five-car set, there is a full-width cab at each end. The cab cars are powered by four traction motors each. The center car of each five-car set is an unpowered trailer, and the other two cars are powered by two traction motors each.

The cab is computerized, with a control stand consisting of a single lever for traction and braking control, a reversing key, a small numeric and symbol keypad, and an LCD flat panel display. The display is used in conjunction with the keypad to control doors, reset alarms of various sorts including the passenger alert system, display train speed and braking information, and do much more.

The R110A cars are similar to R62 cars, but they have squarer ends and wider 63-inch passenger entry doors (over a foot wider than the R62 doors, which were 50 inches). All car ends have clear lexan glass, allowing passengers to see through to the next car, except on cab ends. Their bodies are stainless steel.

Seating is improved by eliminating the bucket seats in favor of comfortable benches in bright colors. The benches, unlike the R62 cars, have some forward-facing seating combined with standard longitudinal seating. One side is shifted from the other, making part of the bench on one side of the car face a door on the other side. Some seating space is removed to allow for wider doors. Interior surfaces are fiberglass, which is resistant to graffiti.

There are LED exterior line indicator signs on all cars, LCD destination signs in windows, and LED interior next stop/variable message signs inside the cars. The LED display on the front of the car could either be red, for Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line service, or green, for Lexington Avenue Line service.

The R110A cars entered service on June 15, 1993, on the 2 service. In 1999, they were pulled out of service due to brake problems and fire damage, and were stored until 2013,[1] when the MTA converted the B-cars (non cab cars numbered 8002–8004 and 8007–8009) into flood cleanup pump cars.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "R-110A/R-110B New Technology Program". Nycsubway.org. 1996-11-04. Retrieved 2010-06-06. 

External links[edit]