Air Force Training Group RAAF

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from RAAF Training Command)
Jump to: navigation, search
Air Force Training Group RAAF
TC RAAF.png
Air Force Training Group's crest
Active 1953–59, 1990–2006 (Training Command)
2006–current (Air Force Training Group)
Country Australia
Branch Royal Australian Air Force
Part of Air Command
Garrison/HQ RAAF Williams
Motto "Train to defend"
Commanders
Current
commander
Air Commodore Brian Edwards

Air Force Training Group is the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) group responsible for training personnel. It is headquartered at RAAF Williams, Victoria. The group was established as Training Command in 1953. It formed part of Support Command between from 1959 to 1990, when it was re-established as Training Command. In July 2006, Training Command was re-formed as Air Force Training Group under Air Command. Air Force Training Group units are organised into Air Training Wing, Ground Training Wing, Reserve Training Wing, and RAAF College.

Establishment and evolution[edit]

Air Force Training Group was established as Training Command at Albert Park, Victoria, on 1 September 1953.[1] It was formed from Southern Area Command, which was the hub of RAAF training services at the time.[2] Training Command merged with Maintenance Command to form Support Command on 7 September 1959.[1][3] On 7 February 1990, Training Command was re-established as a discrete organisation, headquartered at RAAF Base Point Cook, Victoria. The headquarters re-located to RAAF Williams (Laverton Base) on 1 January 1999.[1] On 1 July 2006, Training Command was re-formed as Air Force Training Group under Air Command.[4]

Responsibilities and bases[edit]

Air Force Training Group is responsible for the provision of training to members of the RAAF, as well as some personnel from the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), the Australian Army, and overseas defence forces. It also develops training policy and procedures, and supports Air Force public relations activities through the Roulettes aerobatic team, the RAAF Balloon, RAAF Museum, and the Air Force Band. Its units are located at bases in every Australian state and mainland territory.[4]

Structure[edit]

Air Force Training Group comprises a headquarters and four major components, or wings: Air Training Wing, Ground Training Wing, Reserve Training Wing, and RAAF College. These components oversee several flying units, ground schools, reserve squadrons, and the Air Force Band.[4]

Commander[edit]

As of 2013, Air Force Training Group's commander was Air Commodore Brian Edwards.[5]

Components[edit]

Headquarters Air Force Training Group[edit]

Headquarters Air Force Training Group (HQ AFTG) is located at RAAF Williams (Laverton Base), Victoria. HQ AFTG is responsible for the management of RAAF training through the development of policy and plans, design and review of training programs, evaluation of relevant technology, and the issuing of awards recognising staff qualifications and achievements.[4]

Air Training Wing[edit]

Single-engined military monoplane, painted red and white, in flight with wheels down
Pilatus PC-9 of No. 2 Flying Training School in 2008

Air Training Wing, headquartered at RAAF Base East Sale, Victoria,[6] oversees flying instruction for RAAF and other Australian Defence Force personnel, training for air combat officers and air traffic controllers, and public flying displays. It controls several units across Australia:[4]

The Australian Defence Force Basic Flying Training School is responsible for flight screening and basic flying instruction for the RAAF, RAN and Australian Army; the school conducts training under a contract with BAE Systems Australia and operates C/T4B Airtrainers.[7] No. 2 Flying Training School is responsible for advanced flying instruction for both the RAAF and RAN, and operates Pilatus PC-9 aircraft.[4] Central Flying School also operates PC-9s, and is responsible for training flight instructors and maintaining flying standards across the RAAF;[4][8] it controls the Roulettes aerobatic team and the RAAF Balloon.[9][10] No. 32 Squadron operates Beechcraft King Air B350 aircraft, which support the School of Air Warfare.[4] RAAF Museum operates several types of heritage aircraft for flying displays.[11]

Ground Training Wing[edit]

Ground Training Wing, headquartered at RAAF Base Wagga, New South Wales,[12] is responsible for providing technical and other non-flying training to Air Force personnel.[13] Part of AFTG when the group was formed in 2006, Ground Training Wing merged with RAAF College on 1 January 2008, before being re-raised as a separate wing on 1 December 2009.[13][14] The wing controls several schools in New South Wales and Queensland:[13]

Reserve Training Wing[edit]

Marching air force personnel in blue uniforms and caps, led by flag bearer
No. 28 (City of Canberra) Squadron passes by Civic Square during the unit's Freedom of the City parade in 2013

Reserve Training Wing, headquartered at RAAF Base Amberley, provides ground training to the Air Force Reserve, and supports Australian Defence Force units utilising Air Force Reserve personnel.[4] It was formed on 18 May 1998 as Combat Reserve Wing, under Combat Support Group, and renamed Reserve Training Wing on 1 January 2006.[15] The wing controls ten squadrons based throughout Australia:[4]

RAAF College[edit]

RAAF College, headquartered at RAAF Base Wagga,[12] is responsible for career development, promotion and leadership training.[4] It was formed at RAAF Base Point Cook on 1 August 1947, and reorganised as RAAF Academy in 1961. It re-formed again as RAAF College in 1986, following the establishment of the tri-service Australian Defence Force Academy. The college took over the schools and responsibilities of Ground Training Wing on 1 January 2008, before the latter was re-raised as a separate organisation on 1 December 2009.[13][26] RAAF College controls several units in New South Wales and Victoria:[13]

  • No. 1 Recruit Training Unit at RAAF Base Wagga
  • School of Postgraduate Studies at RAAF Base Wagga
  • Officers' Training School at RAAF Base East Sale
  • Defence International Training Centre at RAAF Williams
  • Air Force Band at RAAF Williams

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Training Command History". Royal Australian Air Force. Archived from the original on 17 September 2000. Retrieved 28 January 2012. 
  2. ^ Stephens, Going Solo, pp. 73–75
  3. ^ Stephens, Going Solo, pp. 76–77
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Air Force Training Group". Royal Australian Air Force. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "Uplifting change". Air Force. 7 November 2013. p. 2. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "RAAF Base East Sale". Royal Australian Air Force. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  7. ^ Slocombe, Geoff (28 January 2013). "ADF pilot training – a very slow take off". Asia-Pacific Defence Reporter. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  8. ^ Wilson, Royal Australian Air Force 1921–2011, p. 12
  9. ^ McPhedran, Air Force, p. 79
  10. ^ "FAQ about the Balloon". Royal Australian Air Force. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  11. ^ "Interactive Flying Displays". RAAF Museum. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  12. ^ a b "RAAF Base Wagga". Royal Australian Air Force. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  13. ^ a b c d e "Spreading its wings". Air Force: p. 20. 4 February 2010. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  14. ^ "End of an era for RAAFCOL". Air Force: pp. 14–15. 13 December 2007. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  15. ^ "Air Force Reserves – History". Royal Australian Air Force. Archived from the original on 3 July 2009. Retrieved 1 February 2014. 
  16. ^ "No. 13 (City of Darwin) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "No. 21 (City of Melbourne) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  18. ^ "No. 22 (City of Sydney) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  19. ^ "No. 23 (City of Brisbane) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  20. ^ "No. 24 (City of Adelaide) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  21. ^ "No. 25 (City of Perth) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  22. ^ "No 28 (City of Canberra) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  23. ^ "No. 27 (City of Townsville) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  24. ^ "No. 28 (City of Canberra) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  25. ^ "No. 29 (City of Hobart) Squadron". Archived from the original on 26 March 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  26. ^ "End of an era for RAAFCOL". Air Force: pp. 14–15. 13 December 2007. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 

References[edit]