RAF East Moor

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RAF East Moor
Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svgRoyal Canadian Air Force Ensign (1941-1968).svg
IATA: noneICAO: none
Summary
Airport type Military
Owner Air Ministry
Operator Royal Air Force
Royal Canadian Air Force
Location Sutton-on-the-Forest
Built 1941
In use 1942-1946
Elevation AMSL 92 ft / 28 m
Coordinates 54°04′08″N 001°05′06″W / 54.06889°N 1.08500°W / 54.06889; -1.08500Coordinates: 54°04′08″N 001°05′06″W / 54.06889°N 1.08500°W / 54.06889; -1.08500
Map
RAF East Moor is located in North Yorkshire
RAF East Moor
RAF East Moor
Location in North Yorkshire
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
02/20 4,298 1,310 Concrete
06/24 4,413 1,345 Concrete
16/34 5,692 1,735 Concrete

Royal Air Force Station East Moor or RAF East Moor was a Royal Air Force station located 7.4 miles (11.9 km) north of York, North Yorkshire and 5.5 miles (8.9 km) south east of Easingwold, North Yorkshire, England.

The airfield was initially controlled by the Royal Air Force until the site was transferred to the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1942 before being handed back in November 1945.

History[edit]

East Moor was opened in 1942[1] and was originally a 4 Group facility and first hosted No. 158 Squadron RAF which moved from RAF Driffield on 6 June 1942. The squadron flew the Handley Page Halifax Mk. II with detachments at RAF Beaulieu and RAF Manston before moving to RAF Rufforth on 6 November 1942.[2]

Royal Canadian Air Force use[edit]

The first squadron was No. 429 Squadron RCAF which formed at the airfield on 7 November 1942 initially only flying the Vickers Wellington Mk.III until January 1943 when the Wellington Mk. X was added. The squadron left on 13 August 1943 going to RAF Leeming where the unit re-equipped with Halifaxes. On 19 September 1943 the next squadron arrived being 432 Squadron which initially used the Avro Lancaster Mk.II before being re-equipped with the Halifax Mk. III in February 1944 and the Mk. VII Halifax in July 1944. The squadron disbanded on 15 May 1945 at the airfield.[3]

The last Canadian squadron to use the airfield was 415 Squadron which flew the Halifax III from 26 July 1944. The unit inherited the additional Mk.VII versions during March 1945 but disbanded shortly after on 15 May 1945 at the airfield.[4]

Royal Air Force use[edit]

Not long after the last Canadian squadron disbanded the airfield was handed back to the Royal Air Force (RAF). The first RAF unit to use the airfield was No. 54 Operational Training Unit (OTU) which had moved in during November 1945 flying the de Havilland Mosquito.[5] By May 1946 No. 288 Squadron RAF joined with their Supermarine Spitfire IX's and their Vultee Vengeance Mk. IV's with a detachment at RAF Acklington. The squadron disbanded on 15 June 1946.[6] No. 54 OTU stayed until June 1946 when the unit moved to RAF Leeming but a detachment stayed until 15 November 1946.[5][7]

Units and aircraft[edit]

Unit From To Aircraft Version Notes
No. 158 Squadron RAF 6 June 1942 6 November 1942 Handley Page Halifax Mk.II Moved to RAF Rufforth.[2]
No. 288 Squadron RAF 24 May 1946 15 June 1946 Vultee Vengeance
Supermarine Spitfire
Mk.IV
Mks.VB and IX
Disbanded at the airfield.[6]
No. 415 Squadron RCAF 26 July 1944 15 May 1945 Handley Page Halifax Mks.III, VII Disbanded at airfield.[4]
No. 429 Squadron RCAF 7 November 1942 13 August 1943 Vickers Wellington Mks.III, X Formed at airfield.[3]
No. 432 Squadron RCAF 19 September 1943 15 May 1945 Vickers Wellington
Avro Lancaster
Handley Page Halifax
Mk.X
Mk.II
Mks.III, VII
Disbanded at the airfield.[3]
No. 54 OTU 1 November 1945 30 June 1946 (det. till 15 November 1946) de Havilland Mosquito [8][9][10][7][11]
No. 158 Conversion Flight 7 June 1942 25 September 1942 Handley Page Halifax Mk.II [12]
No. 1678 Heavy Conversion Flight 18 May 1943 13 December 1943 Avro Lancaster Mk.II [12]
No. 12 Air Crew Holding Unit 15 June 1945 8 October 1945 [12]

Current use[edit]

The airfield closed to flying in November 1946. Most of the buildings were taken down and the land has reverted largely to agricultural use.[13]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "RAF East Moor, Yorkshire". Airfield Archaeology. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Jefford 2001, p. 63.
  3. ^ a b c Jefford 2001, p. 91.
  4. ^ a b Jefford 2001, p. 90.
  5. ^ a b "No. 54 Operational Training Unit". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Jefford 2001, p. 83.
  7. ^ a b Sturtivant 2007, p. 203.
  8. ^ Sturtivant 2007, p. 43.
  9. ^ Sturtivant 2007, p. 96.
  10. ^ Sturtivant 2007, p. 99.
  11. ^ Sturtivant 2007, p. 249.
  12. ^ a b c "RAF East Moor". Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 1 July 2010. 
  13. ^ "History of RAF East Moor". Royal Air Force. Retrieved 1 July 2010. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Jefford, C.G, MBE,BA,RAF (Retd). RAF Squadrons, a Comprehensive Record of the Movement and Equipment of all RAF Squadrons and their Antecedents since 1912. Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK: Airlife Publishing, 2001. ISBN 1-84037-141-2.
  • Sturtivant, R. RAF Flying Training and Support Units since 1912. Air Britain, 2007. ISBN 0-85130-365-X.

External links[edit]