REDCON

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In the U.S. military, the term REDCON is short for Readiness Condition and is used to refer to a unit's readiness to respond to and engage in combat operations.[1] There are five REDCON levels, as described below in this excerpt from Army Field Manual 71-1.

Overview[edit]

  • REDCON-1: Full alert; unit ready to move and fight.
    • WMD alarms and hot loop equipment[2] stowed; OPs pulled in. (A hot loop is a field telephone circuit between the subunits of a company.)
    • All personnel alert and mounted on vehicles; weapons manned.
    • Engines started.
    • Company team is ready to move immediately.
  • REDCON-1.5
    • WMD alarms and hot loop equipment stowed; OPs pulled in.
    • All personnel alert and mounted on vehicles; weapons manned.
    • Company team is ready to move immediately.
  • REDCON-2: Full alert; unit ready to fight.
    • Equipment stowed (except hot loop and WMD alarms).
    • Precombat checks complete.
    • All personnel alert and mounted in vehicles; weapons manned.
    • (NOTE: Depending on the tactical situation and orders from the commander, dismounted OPs may remain in place.)
    • All (100 percent) digital and FM communications links operational.
    • Status reports submitted in accordance with task force SOP.
    • Company team is ready to move within 15 minutes of notification.
  • REDCON-3: Reduced alert.
    • Fifty percent of the unit executes work and rest plans.
    • Remainder of the unit executes security plan. Based on the commander’s guidance and the enemy situation, some personnel executing the security plan may execute portions of the work plan.
    • Company team is ready to move within 30 minutes of notification.
  • REDCON-4: Minimum alert.
    • OPs manned; one soldier per platoon designated to monitor radio and man turret weapons.
    • Digital and FM links with task force and other company teams maintained.
    • Company team is ready to move within one hour of notification.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stoneberger, Brett A. (2005). Combat Leader's Field Guide, 13th Ed.. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stockpole Books. p. 23. ISBN 0-8117-3195-2. 
  2. ^ hot loop equipment