RER C

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‹See Tfm›     RER C
RER.svg Paris rer C jms.svg
Overview
Stations 84
Ridership 140,000,000 journeys per year
Operation
Opening 1979
(last extension in 2006)
Rolling stock Z 5600, Z 8800,
Z 20500, Z 20900
Technical
Line length 185.6 km (115.3 mi)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Route map
RER C.svg

Geographically accurate path of the RER C.

The RER C is one of the five lines in the RER rapid transit system serving Paris, France. It is operated by SNCF.

The line runs from the northwestern terminuses Pontoise (C1), Versailles-Château (C5) and Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (C7) to the southeastern terminuses Massy-Palaiseau (C2), Dourdan-la-Forêt (C4), Saint-Martin d'Étampes (C6) and Versailles – Chantiers (C8).

The RER C is the second longest line in the network, with over 187 km (116 mi) of route. Each day, over 531 trains run on the RER C alone, and carries over 490,000 passengers daily, which is 100,000 passengers more than the entirety of over 800 TGVs. It is also the most popular RER line for tourists which represents 15% of its passengers, as the line serves many monuments and museums, including the Palace of Versailles. However, the numerous stops, especially inside Paris, and combined with an old and fragile infrastructure, makes the line very slow and inefficient inside the Parisian section of the RER C.

History[edit]

The view from Île aux Cygnes towards the Eiffel Tower, with a RER-C train crossing the Pont Rouelle.
RER C
‹See Tfm›  C1 
Pontoise Transilien Paris – NordTransilien Paris – Saint-Lazare
Oise
Saint-Ouen-l'Aumône Transilien Paris – Nord
Saint-Ouen-l'Aumône – Liesse Transilien Paris – Nord
Pierrelaye Transilien Paris – Nord
‹See Tfm›  C3 
Montigny – Beauchamp Transilien Paris – Nord
Franconville – Le Plessis-Bouchard Transilien Paris – Nord
Cernay
‹See Tfm›  C5 
Ermont – Eaubonne Transilien Paris – NordTransilien Paris – Saint-Lazare
Versailles-Château
Saint-Gratien
Porchefontaine
Épinay-sur-Seine Île-de-France tramway Line 8
‹See Tfm›  C7 
Seine
Transilien Paris – MontparnasseTransilien La Défense
Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines
Gennevilliers Île-de-France tramway Line 1
Transilien Paris – MontparnasseTransilien La Défense
Saint-Cyr
Les Grésillons
‹See Tfm›  C8 
Seine
Transilien Paris – MontparnasseTransilien La Défense
Versailles – Chantiers
Saint-Ouen
Transilien Paris – Montparnasse
Viroflay – Rive-Gauche
Porte de Clichy Paris Métro Line 13
Chaville-Vélizy
Pereire – Levallois Paris Métro Line 3
Neuilly – Porte Maillot Paris Métro Line 1
Meudon – Val Fleury
Avenue Foch Paris Métro Line 2
Issy
Avenue Henri Martin
Île-de-France tramway Line 2
Issy – Val de Seine
Boulainvilliers Paris Métro Line 9
Île-de-France tramway Line 3a
Pont du Garigliano
Avenue du Président Kennedy
Paris Métro Line 10
Javel
Seine
Champ de Mars – Tour Eiffel Paris Métro Line 6
Petit Jouy - Les Loges
Pont de l'Alma Paris Métro Line 9
Invalides Paris Métro Line 8Paris Métro Line 13
Musée d'Orsay Paris Métro Line 12
Jouy-en-Josas
Saint-Michel – Notre-Dame RER BParis Métro Line 4Paris Métro Line 10
Gare d'Austerlitz Paris Métro Line 5Paris Métro Line 10
Bibliothèque François Mitterrand Paris Métro Line 14
Vauboyen
Ivry-sur-Seine
Vitry-sur-Seine
Les Ardoines
Bièvres
Choisy-le-Roi
Villeneuve-le-Roi
Igny
Ablon
Athis-Mons
Juvisy RER D
Les Saules
‹See Tfm›  C10 
Orly – Ville
Savigny-sur-Orge
Orlyval
Pont de Rungis – Aéroport d'Orly
‹See Tfm›  C12 
Petit Vaux
Île-de-France tramway Line 7
Rungis – La Fraternelle
Gravigny – Balizy
Chemin d'Antony
Chilly-Mazarin
RER B
Massy – Verrières
Longjumeau
RER B
Massy – Palaiseau
Épinay-sur-Orge
‹See Tfm›  C2 
Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois
Saint-Michel-sur-Orge
Brétigny-sur-Orge
La Norville - Saint-Germain-lès-Arpajon
Marolles-en-Hurepoix
Arpajon
Bouray
Égly
Lardy
Breuillet - Bruyères-le-Châtel
Chamarande
Breuillet - Village
Étréchy
Saint-Chéron
Étampes
Sermaise
Saint-Martin-d'Étampes
Dourdan
‹See Tfm›  C6 
Dourdan-la-Forêt
‹See Tfm›  C4 

Line C was opened on 26 September 1979 following the construction of a new 1-kilometre (0.62 mi) tunnel connecting the Gare d'Orsay railway terminus (now Musée d'Orsay) with the Invalides terminus of the Rive Gauche line to Versailles, along the banks of the Seine. Services operated between Versailles-ChâteauInvalidesQuai-d'Orsay, branching to Massy – Palaiseau, and JuvisyDourdan / Saint-Martin d'Étampes.

May 1980 : Service extended Saint-Quentin-en-YvelinesVersailles – ChantiersGare des Invalides.

On 25 September 1988 the VMI ("Vallée de Montmorency – Invalides") branch to the north-west opened. This branch mostly used the infrastructure of the "ligne d'Auteuil" (incorporated into the "ligne de petite ceinture" from 1867, closed to passengers from 22 July 1934), and a new 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) tunnel connection between Batignolles and St-Ouen, connecting to the RER C's main trunk at Champ de Mars-Tour Eiffel via a curved bridge (the only one in Paris) over the Seine river. This extended services to Montigny – Beauchamp and Argenteuil.

Porte de Clichy opened on 29 September 1991. Located between Pereire – Levallois and St-Ouen.

In 1992 the line was extended from Juvisy to Versailles.

A further 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) extension from Montigny – Beauchamp to Pontoise was opened on 28 August 2000. On the same day a new station, Bibliothèque François Mitterrand, opened in order to create a new connexion with Métro Line 14. Located between Paris-Austerlitz and Boulevard Masséna (which was closed and replaced by the new station).

Another new station, St-Ouen-l'Aumône-Liesse, opened on 24 March 2002. Located between Pierrelaye and St-Ouen-l'Aumône.

The C3 branch (from Ermont-Eaubonne to Argenteuil) transferred to the Transilien Paris – Saint-Lazare suburban rail network on 27 August 2006.

On 16 December 2006, Boulevard Victor was renamed Boulevard Victor – Pont du Garigliano to highlight the new interchange with tramway line T3. In February 2012, Versailles - Rive Gauche was renamed Versailles-Château, to avoid frequent tourists confusions with other stations in Versailles.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]