Rabirius (architect)

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Rabirius was an Ancient Roman architect who lived during the 1st and 2nd Century AD. His designs included the massive Flavian Palace, situated on the Palatine Hill at Rome, and the Alban Villa at present-day Castel Gandolfo, both erected on a commission by his patron, emperor Domitian.[1]

Domitian's care for the architect may have been mirrored by Vespasian and Titus, his son, as the Colosseum in Rome (across from the Palatine Hill) resembles his work. It has even been suggested that he did the Arch of Titus, a commemorative arch next to the Colosseum honoring the defeat of Jewish nationalism in 79, but the style is not similar enough to make connections past those suggested by the fame of the monuments, one to the Roman Empire and to Rome, and one to the defeat of the The Great Revolt in Judea, begun by Vespasian, and completed by his son, the future Roman Emperor Titus.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jones (1992), pp. 95–97

References[edit]

  • Jones, Brian W. (1992). The Emperor Domitian. London: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-10195-6.