Racho Petrov

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Racho Petrov
Рачо Петров
Racho Petrov.jpg
12th Prime Minister of Bulgaria
In office
25 January 1901 – 5 March 1901
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Todor Ivanchov
Succeeded by Petko Karavelov
In office
19 May 1903 – 5 November 1906
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Stoyan Danev
Succeeded by Dimitar Petkov
Chief of the General Staff
In office
9 September 1885 – 29 April 1887
Monarch Alexander
Preceded by Office Established
Succeeded by Stefan Paprikov
In office
23 October 1887 – 15 April 1894
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Stefan Paprikov
Succeeded by Nikola Ivanov
War Minister
In office
10 July 1887 – 1 September 1887
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Danail Nikolaev
Succeeded by Sava Mutkurov
In office
27 April 1894 – 29 November 1896
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Mikhail Savov
Succeeded by Nikola Ivanov
Minister of Interior
In office
10 December 1900 – 4 March 1901
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Vasil Radoslavov
Succeeded by Mihail Sarafov
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
21 January 1901 – 4 March 1901
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Dimitar Tonchev
Succeeded by Stoyan Danev
In office
18 May 1903 – 4 November 1906
Monarch Ferdinand
Preceded by Stoyan Danev
Succeeded by Dimitar Petkov
Personal details
Born 3 March 1861
Shumen, Ottoman Empire
Died 22 January 1942(1942-01-22) (aged 80)
Belovo, Bulgaria
Military service
Allegiance Bulgarian Army
Years of service 1878—1917
Rank General of the Infantry
Battles/wars Serbo-Bulgarian War, First Balkan War, Second Balkan War, Balkans Campaign (World War I)

Racho Petrov Stoyanov (Bulgarian: Рачо Петров Стоянов) (3 March 1861, in Shumen – 22 January 1942) was a leading Bulgarian general and politician.

A talented soldier, Petrov was appointed to be Chief of General Staff at the age of 24 and was Minister of Defence at 27.[1] During the First World War he served as Chief of the 4th Army.

As a politician he twice served as Prime Minister of Bulgaria as the non-party head of an interim administration and then for a longer period from 1903–1906, having been appointed for fear of war after a Bulgarian insurrection in Ottoman Macedonia.

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