Radbourne Hall

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Radbourne Hall in the 1860s

Radbourne Hall is an 18th-century country house, the home of the Chandos-Pole family, situated at Radbourne, Derbyshire. It is a Grade I listed building.

The Manor of Radbourne was held by the Chandos family from the time of the Norman Conquest.[1] On the death of Sir John Chandos in 1369 it passed to his niece who married Sir Peter de la Pole of Newborough, Staffordshire.

The present house was built in about 1739 for his descendant German Pole, probably by architect William Smith the Younger[2] The red brick construction has two storeys and a basement. The entrance front has seven bays, the central three of which slightly project and have a pediment bearing the Pole family arms.

Several members of the Pole family served as High Sheriff of Derbyshire, including Samuel Pole (1651–1731), who was the father of Edward Pole, a lieutenant-general, and Charles Pole, a Member of Parliament. The Pole Baronets of Wolverton, Hampshire descend from Charles Pole.

In 1807 Edward Sacheverell Pole, adopted by sign manual, the additional surname of Chandos to commemorate his descent from Sir John Chandos. Since then the family surname has been Chandos-Pole. Edward Sacherevell Chandos-Pole, High Sheriff in 1827 was succeeded in that office by his son and namesake. He extended and modernised the property in 1865.

A succession of Poles and Chandos-Poles were rectors of St. Andrews Church in Radbourne: 1715, Samuel Pole; 1758, John le Hunt, whose patron was German Pole; 1790, Edward Pole, whose patron was Sacheverell Pole; 1824, H. Reginald Chandos-Pole, whose patron was Edward Sacheverell Chandos-Pole. Finally, in August 1866 William Chandos-Pole became vicar, whose patrons were John Yarde Buller, Edward Levett and Rev. William Chandos-Pole.[3]

Erasmus Darwin lived in the house briefly, following his marriage in 1781 to Elizabeth Pole.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland Burke and Burke Pt II (1863) p1205/7 Google Books
  2. ^ English Heritage; architectural description of listed building
  3. ^ Notes on the Churches of Derbyshire, Vol. III, John Charles Cox, Bemrose & Sons, London, 1877
  4. ^ The Genius of Erasmus Darwin CUM Smith and R Arnott (2005) p372 Google Books

Coordinates: 52°55′02″N 1°34′32″W / 52.9173°N 1.5755°W / 52.9173; -1.5755