Radio Bulgaria

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Radio Bulgaria (BNR)
Type Radio network
Country  Bulgaria
Availability International
Owner Government of Bulgaria
Key people
Angel Nedyalkov (Director)
Launch date
March 30, 1930
Official website
http://www.bnr.bg/

Radio Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Радио България, Radio Balgariya; BNR) is the official international broadcasting station of Bulgaria.

History[edit]

For almost seventy years the world service of the Bulgarian radio, formerly called Radio Sofia but now renamed Radio Bulgaria, has been presenting the country’s cultural and national identity to the world. It is a principal source of information from and about Bulgaria for millions of listeners outside its borders.

Current broadcasting[edit]

In 2004, Radio Bulgaria broadcasts to Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America on short and medium wave in Bulgarian, English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Serbian, Greek, Albanian and Turkish. The Turkish language programmes are also targeted at the population of Turkish ethnic origin in the regions with a compact Turkish speaking population in this country. These programmes total 58 hours a day. Radio Bulgaria’s programmes are also broadcast by over 50 radio stations in more than 30 countries around the globe.

The radio is now taking the first step in multimedia development, with the new Bulgarian National Radio web site. This puts a new product on the World Wide Web – information in text, sound and image from and about Bulgaria in Bulgarian, English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Serbian, Greek, Turkish, Albanian as well as Arabic.

Radio Bulgaria ended its shortwave service on February 1, 2012.[1]

Comparison[edit]

Estimated total direct programme hours per week of some external radio broadcasters for 1996
Broadcaster 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 1996[2]
United States VOA, RFE/RL & Radio Martí 497 1,495 1,907 1,901 2,611 1,821
China China Radio International 66 687 1,267 1,350 1,515 1,620
United Kingdom BBC World Service 643 589 723 719 796 1,036
Russia Radio Moscow / Voice of Russia[1][3] 533 1,015 1,908 2,094 1,876 726
Germany Deutsche Welle 0 315 779 804 848 655
Egypt Radio Cairo (ERTU) 0 301 540 546 605 604
Iran IRIB World Service / Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran 12 24 155 175 400 575
India All India Radio 116 157 271 389 456 500
Japan NHK World Radio Japan 0 203 259 259 343 468
France Radio France Internationale 198 326 200 125 379 459
Netherlands Radio Netherlands Worldwide[1] 127 178 335 289 323 392
Israel Israel Radio International[1] 0 91 158 210 253 365
Turkey Voice of Turkey 40 77 88 199 322 364
North Korea Radio Pyongyang / Voice of Korea 0 159 330 597 534 364
Bulgaria Radio Bulgaria[1] 30 117 164 236 320 338
Australia Radio Australia 181 257 350 333 330 307
Albania Radio Tirana (RTSH) 26 63 487 560 451 303
Romania Radio Romania International 30 159 185 198 199 298
Spain Radio Exterior de España 68 202 251 239 403 270
Portugal RDP Internacional[1] 46 133 295 214 203 226
Cuba Radio Havana Cuba 0 0 320 424 352 203
Italy Rai Italia Radio[1] 170 205 165 169 181 203
Canada Radio Canada International[1] 85 80 98 134 195 175
Poland Radio Polonia[1] 131 232 334 337 292 171
South Africa Radio RSA / Channel Africa 0 63 150 183 156 159
Sweden Sveriges Radio International[1] 28 114 140 155 167 149
Hungary Magyar Rádió[1] 76 120 105 127 102 144
Czech Republic Radio Prague[4] 119 196 202 255 131 131
Nigeria Voice of Nigeria 0 0 62 170 120 127
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Radio Belgrade / International Radio of Serbia 80 70 76 72 96 68

Source: International Broadcast Audience Research, June 1996

The list includes about a quarter of the world's external broadcasters whose output is both publicly funded and worldwide. Among those excluded are Taiwan, Vietnam, South Korea and various international commercial and religious stations.

Notes:

  1. Does not broadcast on shortwave as of 2014.
  2. 1996 figures as at June; all other years as at December.
  3. Before 1991, broadcasting for the former USSR.
  4. Before 1996, broadcasting for the former Czechoslovakia.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "As of February 1 Radio Bulgaria suspends shortwave broadcasts". Radio Bulgaria. January 19, 2012. Retrieved July 5, 2013.