Radyr railway station

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Coordinates: 51°30′59.74″N 03°14′57″W / 51.5165944°N 3.24917°W / 51.5165944; -3.24917

Radyr National Rail
Welsh: Radur
Radyr
Location
Place Radyr
Local authority Cardiff
Grid reference ST134804
Operations
Station code RDR
Managed by Arriva Trains Wales
Number of platforms 3
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2002/03 Increase 0.247 million
2004/05 Increase 0.296 million
2005/06 Increase 0.315 million
2006/07 Increase 0.356 million
2007/08 Increase 0.413 million
2008/09 Increase 0.450 million
2009/10 Increase 0.458 million
2010/11 Decrease 0.457 million
2011/12 Decrease 0.449 million
2012/13 Increase 0.462 million
2013/14 Increase 0.469 million
History
Key dates Opened 1 June 1883 (1 June 1883)
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Radyr from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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Radyr railway station is a railway station serving the Radyr area of Cardiff, South Wales. It is at the foot of the hill at the eastern edge of the village, alongside the River Taff and adjacent to the Taff Trail.

History[edit]

Radyr was originally a major railway junction and the location of sidings forming a marshalling yard for freight trains used in the industries in the Glamorgan valleys. It was first opened by the Taff Vale Railway in 1863.[1] At one time there were four running lines through the station, up and down passenger and up and down goods on the Taff Vale main line to the valleys northwards and via Llandaff to Cardiff and the docks to the south east. Immediately south of the station, the Cardiff City line diverged southwards and reached the east side of Cardiff via Waterhall Junction, en route to the harbour at Penarth. The marshalling yard was south of the station in the fork between the running lines.

After the Cardiff City line became freight only, and following the down-turn in coal traffic; the marshalling yard closed, and the sidings were greatly rationalised and became a permanent way depot. The platforms were also rationalised, from five to two, one up and one down.

Redevelopment[edit]

In 1987 passenger services were restored to the City Line. This made Radyr a bottleneck, as the terminating trains coming from that line occupied the down platform and delays along the line to the valleys were inevitable.

Redesigned as a commuter station in 1998, major renovations took place, resulting in the two freight lines being replaced by a third platform, eliminating the problem of congestion. Also, a new ticket office was built and modern shelters replaced the old waiting area. These renovations coincided with the upgrades along the Taff Main Line, where the most of the track was replaced between Cardiff and Pontypridd, and the old-fashioned semaphore signals were replaced with modern, colour light signals worked from a new panel box here (this supervises the Rhondda Line all the way to Treherbert).

These renovation allowed the last of the old sidings to be removed, redeveloped for parking and as a housing developments.

Present[edit]

Today, the station has three platforms, all operated by Arriva Trains Wales. Platform 1 is used for trains heading towards Cardiff Central on the Rhondda and Merthyr lines. Platforms 2 and 3 are used both for trains heading away from Cardiff and as a terminus for the City line. The majority of the trains stopping at Radyr run on the Merthyr and Rhondda lines.

The car park is on the opposite side of the tracks from Platform 3. The station is not accessible to the disabled as a bridge is required to access all three platforms. Platform 1 is also accessible from a road that passes under the rails close to the car park entrance, up a flight of stairs and past the old waiting shelter. However, the proximity of the car park and ticket office to the aerial bridge has left this route largely unused.

The ticket office is manned during peak morning hours. Travel time into Cardiff Central is 15 minutes on all lines, with trains on the Rhondda and Merthyr lines running about every 15 minutes.

In July 2007, members of the Radyr Comprehensive Green Flag Committee formally adopted the station and now frequently check that the station is clean and that all amenities are working. This link ties in with a community response to ensure that railway crime is stamped out.

Services[edit]

During Monday-Saturday daytimes, there are usually eight trains an hour from Cardiff Central to destinations including Pontypridd, Treherbert, Merthyr Tydfil and Aberdare. There are eight trains an hour to Cardiff Central with some trains continuing beyond Cardiff to Barry Island, Bridgend (via the Vale of Glamorgan line) and Coryton (via the City line).

A reduced service operates on Sundays, with no trains on the City line.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hutton, John (2006). The Taff Vale Railway 1. Silver Link. p. not cited. ISBN 978-1-85794-249-1. 

External links[edit]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Danescourt   Arriva Trains Wales
Coryton - Cardiff Queen Street - Radyr
  Terminus
Llandaf   Arriva Trains Wales
Merthyr Line
  Taffs Well
Arriva Trains Wales
Rhondda Line