Izhbitza – Radzin (Hasidic dynasty)

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Shul in Izhbitza
The Central Radziner Beis Hamedrash in Radzin and the Central Radziner Yeshiva Sod Yesharim
The Central Radziner Beis Hamedrash in Bnei Brak, which houses the Radziner Yeshiva Ateres Shlomo and the Yeshiva Tiferes Yosef

Izhbitza-Radzin is the name of a dynasty of Hasidic rebbes. The first rebbe of this dynasty was Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner, author of Mei Hashiloach, in the city of Izhbitza. (Izhbitza is the Yiddish name of Izbica, located in present-day Poland). Rabbi Mordechai Yosef founded his own Hasidic movement in the year 5600 (1839), with Rabbi Mordechai Yosef leaving the court of Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Kotzk.

His son and successor, Rabbi Yaakov Leiner of Izhbitza, moved to Radzin. The dynasty today is therefore known more as the "Radziner Dynasty". The third Rebbe, Rabbi Gershon Henoch Leiner of Radzin, re-instituted the use of techeiles of the tzitzis.

The more known works of the Izhbitzer-Radziner Rebbeim are Mei Hashiloach, Beis Yaakov, Sod Yesharim, and Tiferes Yosef. Today, the largest center of Radziner Hasidim is found in Bnei Brak, Israel, under the leadership of Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin.

History[edit]

First generation[edit]

The Izhbitzer-Radziner dynasty was established on Succos 5600 (1839) by Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner, author of the "Mei Hashiloach". He was a close disciple of Rabbi Simcha Bunim of Peshischa. After Rav Simcha Bunim's death, Rav Mordechai Yosef joined the court of his long-time childhood friend, Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Kotzk. The Kotzker Rebbe appointed him to guide the young chassidim who joined the ranks in Kotzk. When the Kotzker Rebbe began distancing himself from his chassidim, Rav Mordechai Yosef felt it was time for him to begin leading those who were in need of a Rebbe. He left Kotzk, settling in Izhbitza, being known hence as the "Izhbitzer Rebbe". The Mei Hashiloach died 7 Teves 5614 (1854),[1] and was buried in Izhbitza. A number of years after his death a small part of his ideas were put to writing by his grandson, Rabbi Gershon Henoch Leiner of Radzin.

Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor Englard of Radzin
Grand Rabbi Avraham Yissachor Englard of Radzin with his eldest grandson Rabbi Nosson Nachum Englard of Radzin-Yerushalayim (seated right)
Grand Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin - Chanukkah Tisch 5769 (2008)

Second generation[edit]

After the death of the Mei Hashiloach, most of his followers appointed his eldest son, Rabbi Yaakov Leiner, author of "Beis Yaakov" and "Sefer Hazemanim",[1] as Izhbitzer Rebbe. He expanded vastly the Torah of his father, and constantly spoke Torah to his chassidim. During his days the numbers of Izhbitzer Chassidim grew vastly, as he was much more accommodating for newcomers. Many of his thoughts were later published in Beis Yaakov, by his son and successor, Rabbi Gershon Henoch Leiner of Radzin. The Beis Yaakov died 15 Av 5638 (1878) in Druzgenik, Lithuania, and was buried in the nearby village of Rotnica, Lithuania.

Third generation[edit]

After the death of the Beis Yaakov, his followers appointed his eldest son, Rabbi Gershon Henoch Leiner, author of "Orchos Chayim" (on the Tzava'ah - the will - of the Tana Rabbi Eliezer HaGadol) as his successor. He was the first rebbe in the dynasty known as "The Radziner Rebbe". Rav Gershon Henoch was a student of his grandfather and father. The Rebbe is referred to by Radziner Chasidim as the "Orchos Chayim", based on his above-mentioned work. (When the Rebbe published this work, he commented to his brother that he's happy that he got to print his Tzava'ah). In the larger world, the Rebbe is better known as the Ba'al HaTecheiles. He led his followers with a more extreme leadership, similar to that of his grandfather, differing from his father's style. The Orchos Chaim died 4 Teves 5651 (1890), and was buried in Radzin.

Fourth generation[edit]

After the death of the Orchos Chaim, his followers appointed his only son, Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Elazar Leiner, the "Tiferes Yosef", as Radziner Rebbe. The Tiferes Yosef led his followers with a very calm leadership. Thus in his days Radziner Chassidim numbered in the thousands. He was very instrumental in the establishment of Agudat Yisrael, and served as its vice president until his death. During World War I he moved to Warsaw, leading his followers from there. The Rebbe re-instituted the famous shiurim on the Talmud, based on chassidic approaches, which were popular during the times of the Mei HaShiloach. Many of these shiurim were later printed in his sefer, Tiferes Yosef. The Tiferes Yosef died on 26 Shevat 5689 (1929), and was buried in Warsaw.

Fifth generation[edit]

After the death of the Tiferes Yosef, his followers appointed his only son, Rabbi Shmuel Shlomo Leiner, as Radzyner Rebbe. At first, the Rebbe refused to take over his father's position. Only due to the enormous pressure put on him by the thousands of Radziner Chassidim, did he finally consent. The final push was the pressure put on him by his great-uncle, Rav Mottel Leiner, son of the Beis Yaakov, and Rav Michel Rashes of Brisk, one of the most prominent Radziner Chassidim. The Rebbe led his followers with a very sharp and extreme leadership, similar to that of his grandfather, the Orchos Chaim. This caused many chassidim to have to leave Radzin. The Rebbe went as far as to close various shteiblach, which he believed were not appropriate of being called Radziner Shtieblech. His greatest strength of character was brought to light during the years of the holocaust. The Rebbe was known for encouraging resistance to the orders of the Nazis and the Judenrat, and for urging people to break out of the ghettos, flee to the forests and take up arms. The Nazis searched for him greatly, and he was eventually shot to death on 29 Iyar 5702 (1942). He was buried in Wladawa.

Radzin post-Holocaust[edit]

After the Holocaust, the surviving Izhbitzer-Radziner Chassidim crowned Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor Englard (1905–2005),[2] son-in-law of the Tiferes Yosef, as Radziner Rebbe. The Rebbe was also the great-grandson of the second Radomsker Rebbe, Rabbi Avraham Yissachar Dov Rabinowicz, author of the Chessed Le'avrohom.[3] In pre-war Radzin, he was appointed by his brother-in-law, Rabbi Shmuel Shlomo of Radzin, to head the network of Radziner Yeshivos Sod Yesharim. According to the elder chassidim, Rav Shmuel Shlomo crowned him during the Holocaust, before his death, to lead in his place.

Under his leadership, the Izhbitzer-Radziner Dynasty rebuilt itself, with the Center of Radziner Institutions being established in Bnei Brak. The Rebbe also established Radziner Shtieblech in many cities where Radziner Hassidim were concentrated. This includes Jerusalem, Haifa, Netanya, Tel Aviv, Bnei Brak, Holon and Petah Tikva. The Rebbe also re-established the Radziner Yeshiva Sod Yesharim in Jerusalem. In Bnei Brak he established the Radziner Yeshiva Ateres Shlomo, and the Radziner Yeshiva Tiferes Yosef, with many Kollelim located in Jerusalem, Bnei Brak, and Haifa.

An important achievement of Rav Avrohom Yissachar was the re-institution of the dyeing of the techeiles. Much effort was put in by him to re establish the exact procedure as was done in prewar Radzin. Due to his countless efforts, the establishment of the "Center for the Dyeing of the Techeiles" was completed in Bnei Brak. The Rebbe appointed his son, Rabbi Yitzchok Englard, to head this institution.

Rav Avraham Yissachar led his followers with a calm and loving leadership, similar to that of his father-in-law, the Tiferes Yosef. The Rebbe died 20 Tishrei 5766 (2005), and was buried in the Rabbinical section (Chelkas HoRabbanim) of Har HaMenuchos, Jerusalem.

Radzin today[edit]

After the death of Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor of Radzin, his followers crowned his son, Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard, as Radziner Rebbe. He currently resides in Bnei Brak, leading the Radziner Chassidim from the Central Radziner Institution. The Radziner Shtieblech continue to thrive in various cities. In Yerushalayim, the eldest grandson of Rav Avrohom Yissochor, Rabbi Nosson Nochum Englard, was appointed as Radziner Rav, leading the Radziner Shtiebel and community there.

Grand Rabbi Yerucham Leiner of Radzin BP
Grand Rabbi Yaakov Leiner of Radzin BP
Grand Rabbi Moshe Leiner of Radzin, about to give over a Dvar Torah at Tish for the Yahrtzeit of the Mei HaShiloach 7 Teves 5768 (2008)

Additional Branch of Radzin[edit]

In the third generation, after the death of the Orchos Chaim, his younger brother, Rabbi Avraham Yehoshua Heshel Leiner, became Rebbe in the city of Chelm. He was one of the top students of his older brother, the Orchos Chaim. After his death on 27 Shevat 5680 (1920), two of his sons became Rebbe in Chelm, Rabbi Gedalya and Rabbi Ovadya. A number of years later, his son, Rabbi Yeruchem Leiner, became Radziner Rebbe in Cricklewood, England. After the holocaust, he relocated to the Boro Park neighborhood of Brooklyn, opening a Radziner Shtiebel there. His ideas were later published in "Tiferes Yeruchem".

After his death on 20 Av 5724 (1964), his son, Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner, took his place, until his death on 3 Shevat 5751 (1991).

After Rabbi Mordechai Yosef's death, his eldest son, Rabbi Yaakov Leiner, became Radziner Rebbe, until his sudden death on 5 Iyar 5769 (2009). Rav Yaakov studied at Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin, and then at Rabbi Nosson Dovid Rabinowitz's kollel in Shaarei Chesed. He received semichos from the Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem, Rabbi Yitzchok Kolitz and Rabbi Zalman Nechemia Goldberg. In the summer of 1996, he left the kollel to learn for six years in Beth Medrash Govoah in Lakewood, New Jersey, once again reuniting with a Radziner, the rosh yeshiva, Rabbi Yerucham Olshin. During those six years he reviewed his Yoreh Deah many times and went through many Talmudic tractates. In 1992, at the age of 30, he married Miriam, of the Bookson family of Monsey, New York. They had ten children. Rabbi Yaakov published all the writings of his grandfather, Rabbi Yeruchem, a few months before the former's death and considered that work to be his crowning achievement.[1] After Rabbi Yaakov's death, his ideas were published in "Tiferes Yaakov".

Rabbi Moshe Leiner, second son of Rabbi Mordechai Yosef, serves as Radziner Rebbe in the Bayit VeGan neighborhood of Yerushalayim. Among many other noted Talmudic academies, Rav Moshe learned at the Yeshiva of Rabbi Meir Soloveitchik in Yerushalayim.

Biskivitz-Reivitz branch[edit]

In the second generation, after the death of the Beis Yaakov, his younger brother, Rabbi Shmuel Dov Asher Leiner, became Rebbe to a small and select group. At first he remained in Izhbitza, moving shortly after to the city of Biskivitz. The Biskivitzer Rebbe's ideas were printed in "Naos Deshe". He died Acharaon Shel Pesach, 22 Nisan 5665 (1905), and was buried in Biskivitz.

After the death of the Naos Deshe, his followers appointed his nephew, Rabbi Moshe Chaim Sochachevsky, in his place. Rav Moshe Chaim was a son-in-law of the Beis Yaakov, and a grandson of Rabbi Dovid Sochachevski, father-in-law of the Beis Yaakov. Rav Moshe Chaim relocated to the city of Reivitz, hence being known as the Reivitzer Rebbe. After his death, his son, Rabbi Yehoshua Avraham Alter Sochachevski, became Reivitzer Rebbe. In his later years, he moved to Chelm. The Reivitzer Rebbe, with his children and son-in-law, Rabbi Gershon Henoch Leiner, (son of Rabbi Chanina Dovid Leiner of Tomashov), were killed by the Nazi murderers.

Extended family[edit]

Here is a list of additional family members not mentioned above:

      • Rabbi Akiva Tannenbaum of Mord, son-in-law of Beis Yaakov, son of Rabbi Noteh Tannenbaum of Mord, who was one of the respected chassidim of the Mei HaShiloach, and a descendant of HaGaon Rabbi Akiva Eiger, zt'l.
      • Rabbi Shlomo Klepfish, son-in-law of Beis Yaakov, published Beis Yaakov HaKollel.
      • Rabbi Yerucham Meir Leiner of Radzin, son of Beis Yaakov, wrote the introduction to Beis Yaakov HaKollel.
      • Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner of Lublin, son of Beis Yaakov, published the second volume of Mei HaShiloach. One of the important Jewish community figures in Lublin. He was one of the staunch supporters of his great-nephew Grand Rabbi Shmuel Shlomo Leiner of Radzin, and was very instrumental in finally convincing him to become the Radziner Rebbe in his father's place.
      • Grand Rabbi Mordechai Leib Epstein of Kobrin, son-in-law of Beis Yaakov, son of Grand Rabbi Menachem Nochum Epstein of Kubrin-Bialystok.
        • Rabbi Yosef Tzvi (Hirsh) Epstein of Lublin, son of Grand Rabbi Mordechai Leib Epstein of Kobrin, one of the staunch supporters and chassidim of Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissachor Englard of Radzin, and very instrumental in his crowning as Radziner Rebbe after the war.
        • Rabbi Yom Tov Netil Kirshenbaum, son-in-law of Grand Rabbi Mordechai Leib Epstein of Kobrin.
          • Rabbi Mordechai Kirshenbaum, son of Rabbi Yom Tov Kirshenbaum, author of many articles based on the deep Torah of his ancestors, the Rebbes of Izhbitza.
        • Rabbi Sholom Kranwald, son-in-law of Grand Rabbi Moshe Chaim Sokochevski of Reivitz. Died 7 Nissan 5702 (1942).
          • Rabbi Yisroel Yosef Goldhaber of Komrov, son-in-law of Rabbi Sholom Kranwald, one of the prominent Radziner Chassidim in the city of Komrov, Poland. Killed in the Holocaust al Kiddush Hashem, 4 Nissan 5702 (1942).
            • Rabbi Shimon Goldhaber, son of Rabbi Yisroel Yosef Goldhaber. One of the only students of the Radziner Yeshiva Sod Yesharim in Radzin, Poland to survive the war. He was one of the very close chassidim of Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor Englard of Radzin, and served as the head gabbay of the Central Radziner Shul for many years.
              • Rabbi Elchanan Reuven Goldhaber of Bnei Brak, son of Rabbi Shimon Goldhaber. One of the very close chasidim and students of Grand Rabbi Avraham Yissachor Englard of Radzin, and served as his personal assistant for many years. He heads the Institution for the Publication of Sifrei Izhbitza Radzin in Bnei Brak, which has published many of the Izhbitza Radziner seforim in beautiful editions.
            • Rabbi Yeshayohu Englard, son of Grand Rabbi Avraham Yissachor Englard of Radzin.
          • Rabbi Yechiel Tzvi (Herschel) Guraryeh, son-in-law of Tiferes Yosef.
            • Rabbi Nochum Goldschmidt, son-in-law of Rabbi Yechiel Tzvi Guraryeh, author of Bi'urei HaRana'g, Shiyurei HaRana'g, both on the Sefer HaTanya. Lived in Bnei Brak, Israel.
              • Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Elazar Goldschmidt, son of Rabbi Nochum Goldschmidt, the only male descendant of the Orchos Chayim and the Tiferes Yosef, to survive the war. Lives in Bnei Brak, Israel. One of the main supporters backing the crowning of Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor Englard of Radzin as Radziner Rebbe after the war, successor and continuation of the lineage of his ancestors, the Orchos Chayim and the Tiferes Yosef, and of his uncle Grand Rabbi Shmuel Shlomo Leiner of Radzin. He was also instrumental in the crowning of Grand Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin as Radziner Rebbe, successor to his father.
        • Rabbi Chaim Simcha Leiner of Ludmir, son of Likutei Divrei Torah, author of Dor Y'sharim, Sefer Refuos/Darchei Chaim, Malon Orchim.
          • Rabbi Yehoshua Huberfeld, son-in-law of Tiferes Yerucham. Died 29 Shevat 5749 (1989).
            • Grand Rabbi Yitzchok Mordechai Shapiro of Gvodzitz-Sadigura, son-in-law of Rabbi Yehoshua Huberfeld, son-in-law of the Tiferes Yerucham. Son of Grand Rabbi Dovid Moshe Shapiro of Gvodzitz-Sadigura. Shared a very close relationship with his grandfather, the Tiferes Yerucham. Died 14 Tishrei 5766 (2005).
              • Rabbi Shlomo Shapiro of Gvodzitz-Sadigura, son of Rabbi Yitzchok Mordechai Shapiro.
              • Mordechai Yosef Leiner, eldest son of Grand Rabbi Yaakov Leiner of Radzin.
          • Rabbi Yitzchok Yehudah Leib Shachar, son-in-law of Tiferes Yerucham. Died 17 Elul 5713 (1953).
          • Rabbi Aaron Eliezer Lipa Frankel, son-in-law of Tiferes Yerucham. Died 24 Iyar 5739 (1979).
            • Rabbi Avraham Yehoshua Heshel Frankel, son of Rabbi Aaron Eliezer Lipa Frankel.
          • Rabbi Chaim Fleisher, son-in-law of Tiferes Yerucham. Died 27 Sivan 5760 (2000).
        • Rabbi Mordechai Yehudah Leib Grauman, son-in-law of Likutei Divrei Torah.
        • Rabbi Chanina Dovid Leiner of Chelm, son of Likutei Divrei Torah, published Beis Yaakov on Sefer Vayikra together with Likutei Divrei Torah.
          • Rabbi Yaakov Leiner of Chelm-Tel Aviv, son of Rabbi Chanina Dovid Leiner of Chelm. One of the last direct descendants of the Leiner family. One of the main supporters backing the crowning of Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor Englard of Radzin as the Radziner Rebbe, after the war.

Picture gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Rabinowitz, Rabbi Nosson Dovid (3 June 2009). "My Friend, My Chavrusa: The Radziner Rebbe, HaRav Yaakov Lainer". 5 Towns Jewish Times. Retrieved 21 Nov 2011. 
  2. ^ Tannenbaum, Rabbi Gershon (7 April 2009). "Radomsker Rebbe's Yahrzeit". The Jewish Press. Retrieved 30 July 2011. 
  3. ^ "A World That Was", Hamodia Magazine, 21 July 2011, p. 7.

External links[edit]

Reading material[edit]

Audio-video links[edit]