Railway stations in Milan

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Current provision of railway stations throughout the municipality.

Milan, capital of the region of Lombardy, Italy, has 22 railway stations in use today. Six are operated by FERROVIENORD, while the remaining sixteen are managed by RFI.

Five other stations are currently in the planning stage for the city area: Canottieri, Dergano, Forlanini, Tibaldi and Zama.

History of rail transport in Milan[edit]

In the huge explosion of rail transport in the 19th century, Milan was one of the places that invested in the development of this type of transport.

In the late 1830s, Emperor Ferdinand I of Austria granted "the privilege to build a road on iron rails from Milan to Monza" to the Holzhammer company of Bolzano. The privilege authorized the construction of a railway project developed by the Milanese engineer Giulio Sarti.[1]

The Milan–Monza railway, opened in 1840, was the first railway line in Lombardy, and the second in Italy after the Naples–Portici railway. Milan's first railway station, Porta Nuova,[2] formed part of the new railway. It was placed outside the circle of ramparts, near the Porta Nuova city gate, from which it took its name.

In February 1846 came the second Milanese railway station, Porta Tosa-Vittoria, near the city gate of the same name, and outside the circle of ramparts.[3] For eleven years, this station served as the terminus of the Milan–Treviglio railway, which is the Lombard section of the Milan-Venice railway. Since 1857, with the opening of the Treviglio–Bergamo–Coccaglio railway, Porta Tosa station became the western terminus of the railway linking Milan with Venice, the other capital city of the then Kingdom of Lombardy–Venetia.

With the decision to extend the Monza railway further north to Como, it was necessary to widen the Porta Nuova railway station by adding extra space, along the banks of the Naviglio Martesana. The new larger station, with a sizeable three bay train hall covering the tracks and trains, entered service in 1850.[4] Today, the station building of this now former station, which was closed in 1931, can still be recognized inside the barracks of the Guardia di Finanza, in via Melchiorre Gioia.

Chronological list of stations[edit]

Name Inauguration Current state Type Manager
Porta Nuova (I) 1840 Sold Terminal station, surface N/A
Porta Tosa 1846 Demolished Terminal station, surface N/A
Porta Nuova (II) 1850 Sold Terminal station, surface N/A
Certosa 1858 In use Through station, surface RFI
Centrale (old) 1864 Demolished Through station, surface N/A
Porta Genova 1870 In use Terminal station,[5] surface RFI
S.M. Garibaldi 1873 Sold Goods yard N/A
Cadorna 1879 In use Terminal station, surface FERROVIENORD
Bruzzano 1879 In use Through station, surface FERROVIENORD
Affori 1879 In use Through station, surface FERROVIENORD
Bovisa-Politecnico[6] 1879[7] In use Through station, surface FERROVIENORD
S.M. Sempione 1883 Sold Goods yard N/A
Rogoredo 1891 In use Through station, surface RFI/Centostazioni
Porta Romana (goods yard) 1891 In use Goods yard, Through station, surface RFI
Lambrate (old) 1896 Sold Through station, surface N/A
Porta Vittoria 1911 In use Through station, underground RFI
Greco Pirelli 1914 In use Through station, surface RFI
San Cristoforo 1915[8] In use Through station, surface RFI
Porta Romana (passenger stop) 1918 In use Through station, surface RFI
Bullona 1929 Sold Through station, surface FERROVIENORD
Bovisa FS 19?? Sold Through station, surface N/A
Centrale 1931 In use Terminal station, surface RFI/Grandi Stazioni
Lambrate 1931 In use Through station, surface RFI
Porta Nuova (III)[9] 1931[10] Sold Terminal station, surface FS
Quarto Oggiaro 195? In use Through station, surface FERROVIENORD
Porta Garibaldi 1963 In use Through station, surface RFI/Centostazioni
Repubblica 1997 In use Through station, underground RFI
Porta Venezia 1997 In use Through station, underground RFI
Lancetti 1997 In use Through station, underground RFI
Dateo 2002 In uso Through station, underground RFI
Villapizzone 2002 In use Through station, surface RFI
Domodossola-Fiera 2003 In use Through station, underground FERROVIENORD
Romolo 2006 In use Through station, surface RFI

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.storiadimilano.it/citta/milanotecnica/ferrovie/ferrovia.htm
  2. ^ The main two storey building still exists, and is currently occupied by the Office of Testing and Materials Service of the Ferrovie dello Stato.
  3. ^ Where today via Corridoni intersects with via Archimedes and viale Premuda. Via Archimede and via Pasquale Sottocorno border the station yard of the original station.
  4. ^ http://www.storiadimilano.it/citta/milanotecnica/ferrovie/ferrovia.htm
  5. ^ Loop until the mid-1930s
  6. ^ Bovisa until 2007.
  7. ^ Opening of the Bovisa-Paderno Dugnano railway.
  8. ^ Opening of the Milan (Bivio Naviglio Grande)-Milano (S. Cristoforo) railway.
  9. ^ Known unofficially as the Varesine.
  10. ^ Opened in 1911 as a section of the old Centrale railway station.

This article is based upon a translation of the Italian language version as at February 2011.