Raised shoreline

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A raised shoreline is an ancient shoreline exposed above current water level.[1] These landforms are formed by a relative change in sea level due to global sea level rise, isostatic rebound, and/or tectonic uplift. These surfaces are usually exposed above modern sea level when a heavily glaciated area experiences a glacial retreat, causing water levels to rise. This area will then experience post-glacial rebound, effectively raising the shoreline surface.
Examples of raised shorelines can be found along the coasts of formerly glaciated areas in Ireland[2] and Scotland, as well as in North America. Raised shorelines are exposed at various locations around the Puget Sound of Washington State.[3]

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