Raja Karan

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Raja Karan may refer to:

  • Karna (Sanskrit: कर्ण), one of the central figures in the Hindu epic Mahabharata. He was the first son of Kunti and was thus half brother to the Pandavas.
  • Raja Karan of Anhilvada line (in Kathiawar) (1072 AD–1094 AD) who defeated Bhil Chief of Asaval and founded the city of Karanavati.
  • Raja Karan of Gujarat, who fought with and was defeated in 1296 AD at Nehrwala by general Ulugh Khan, brother of Ala-ud-din Khilji, the Emperor of Delhi.
  • Raja Karan of Gwalior (1476 AD), murderer of Fatha Khan, vassal to Bahlul Lodi (1451 AD-1498 AD). Badaoni describes him as raja of Bhogaon.
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Kamboh/Kamboj (कम्बोज)) people now living in Jullundur and Kapurthala, in east Punjab probably Dhul-Qarnayn.[1] (See also:Kambojas). This Raja Karan was a great charity-giver and used to donate 50 ser (40 kg) of gold to the poors every day, before taking his breakfast.
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Dhillon Jatts (Hindi: जाट, Punjabi: ਜੱਟ) of Punjab. Dhillons Jatts have Baj (Baju/Bajju/Bajwe?), Saj (?) and Sanda Jatt septs, hence Bajju, Sanda etc. clans of the Jatts may also be considered to be descendants of Raja Karan.[2]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Goraya Jatts of Punjab. The Goraya Jatts are believed to be a clan of the Dhillon tribe and are said to be related to Saroiah (Saroha/Siroha) Rajput tribe.
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Naru/Narma/Narwa/Narwah Rajputs/Jatts of Gujrat on Jhelum River.[4]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Varya/Baria Rajputs of India [5]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Brah/Warah Rajputs of India [5]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Babbar Jatts of Punjab [6]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Khakh Jatts of Punjab [6]
  • Raja Karan, said to be son of Udadit who belonged to Dwapara yuga. He is the ancestor of the Punwar caste or clan [8]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Kharral Rajputs/Jatts of Punjab.[9] According to Multan Gazetteer, Kharrals are related to the Harrals, Punwar, Langhas, Bhuttas and Lakas.[10]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Harral Rajputs of Punjab.[11] The Kharrals and Harrals are blood cousins,the latter descended from Raja Karan's descendant Rai Bhupa through another son. Thus, Harral clan are also descendants of Raja Karan. They are also related to Punwar Rajputs and came to Uch from Jaiselmer. The Multan tradition discloses that the LANGHAHS (LAHNGAS) are PUNWARS and are allied to the KHARRALS, HARRALS, BHUTTAS, AND THE LAKS.[12]
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Kathia tribe of Ravi/Chenab.[13] The Kathias have divisions of "Kathia proper" and "Baghelas". The Balwanas and Pawars are said to be other two leading clans. The Kathias are said to be related to Punwar Rajputs.[14] Kathias have been identified with Kathaioi of the Alexander's time.
  • Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Wasir clan of the Rajputs.[15]
  • Mythical Raja Karan of Jaipur, claimed to be ancestor of the Kirs and the Kirars.
  • Raja Karan, one of the 12 clans of the Kaisths, known as Karan, claim descent from Raja Karan.[16]
  • Raja Karan, Banjaras of Rajasthan claim descent from Teeda who was the son of (Raja) Karan.[17]
  • Raja Karan, Babbars, a section of the Aroas, trace their descent from Babbar whom they describe as a descendat of Raja Karan of Mahabharata fame.[18]
  • Raja Karan, Several groups of the Nunnaris (salt makers of Gujerat) claim descent from Raja Karan.[19]
  • Raja Karan of Surajbansi line, claimed as the ancestor of the Varaitch Jat clan.[20]
  • Raja Karan, of Mahabharata is claimed to be ancestor of the Phularwan Rajput tribe chiefly found in Panjab province of Pakistan.
  • Raja Karan, said to be the ancestor of the Bhuttas.[23] The Bhutta or Bhutto clan is spread among the Arains, Jatts and the Rajputs of Punjab and Sindh. The Buttas, along with the Harrals, Punwars, Lakas, Langhas/Lahnghas as seen above are also the sections of the Kharrals.[24]
  • The list is endless.

See also[edit]

See: Examples from the Glossary of Tribes, Punjab Castes etc. for further details: Talk:Kamboj#EXAMPLES FROM THE GLOSSARY OF TRIBES.2FPANJAB CASTES ETC

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Glossary of Tribes & Castes by H. Rose p 443-445; Also read: "Kamboh" in Panjab Castes by Denzil Ibbetson , pp 149/150; REPORT ON THE REVISED LAND REVENUE SETTLEMENT OF THE MONTGOMERY DISTRICT IN ..., 1878, p 50, C. A. Roe and W. E. Purser; Gazetteer of the Montgomery District (Sahiwal), 1883-84, Edition 1990, p 68, Punjab (Pakistan), Punjab (Pakistan - Sahiwal District (Pakistan); The Tribes and Castes of the North-western Provinces and Oudh, 1896, p 206, William Crooke - Ethnology; Folklore of the Punjab, 1971, p 8, Sohindara Siṅgha Waṇajārā Bedī - Folklore; Bibliotheca Indica, 1949, p 388, Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, Asiatick Society (Calcutta, India); Punjabi Musalmans, 1991, p 89, J. M. Wikeley - Ethnology; ʻAin-i-Akbari of Abul Fazl-i-ʻAllami , 1948, p 388, Abū al-Faz̤l ibn Mubārak, Jadunath Sarkar; The Historical Background of Pakistan and Its People, 1973, p 128; An Observation: Perspective of Pakistan, 1987, p 100, Ahmed Abdulla; Punjab, the Land of Beauty, Love, and Mysticism, 1992, p 211, Syed Abdul Quddus - Punjab (India); See also: Kamboj Itihaas, p 7, 1972, H. S. Thind.
  2. ^ Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, p 237/238, H. A. Rose; Glossary of Tribes, Vol II, 1911, pp 287, 303 and Vol III, 1911, p 386, H. A. Rose.
  3. ^ Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol III, 467/468, H. A. Rose.
  4. ^ Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol III, pp 158-160, H. A. Rose.
  5. ^ a b Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, p 65, H. A. Rose .
  6. ^ a b Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, H. A. Rose, p 31.
  7. ^ Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, H. A. Rose, read pp 31 and 356 together.
  8. ^ The Legends of the Panjab, Part 2, 1977, p 182, Richard Mercer Dorson, Richard C Temple.
  9. ^ Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, p 496, H. A. Rose; Punjab Castes, 1974 Edition, p 129, Denzil Ibbetson.
  10. ^ Multan Gazetteer, 1902, p 138.
  11. ^ Punjab Castes, 1971, p 78, Denzil Ibbetson.
  12. ^ Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, p 496, fn; See also: Multan Gazetteer, 1902, p 138 .
  13. ^ Denzil Ibbetson , Punjab Castes, p 131; Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, p 482 fn, H. A. Rose.
  14. ^ Denzil Ibbetson , Punjab Castes, p 130, Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, p 482, H. A. Rose.
  15. ^ Glossary of Tribes, Vol III, p 490.
  16. ^ Rajaputana Gezetteer, Vol I, 1879, p 164, by Rajputana (Agency) - Rajasthan (India). NOTE: The Kaisths are a Sudra caste of Bharatpur.
  17. ^ Man in India, 1948, p 18, S Chandra Roy.
  18. ^ Encyclopedia of Indian Surnames, 2002, p 22, Shibani Roy, S. H. M. Rizvi.
  19. ^ Reflections of a Culture Broker, 1991, p 288, Richard Kurin.
  20. ^ Report on the Second Regular Settlement of the Gujrat District, Panjab, 1874, p xiv, W. G. Waterfield; Glossary of Tribes, Vol III, p 486.
  21. ^ Denzil Ibbetson , Punjab Castes, p 131; See also: Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, p 483, H. A. Rose.
  22. ^ The Historical Background of Pakistan and Its People, 1973, p 128; An Observation: Perspective of Pakistan, 1987, p 100, Ahmed Abdulla; Punjab, the Land of Beauty, Love, and Mysticism, 1992, p 211, Syed Abdul Quddus - Punjab (India)).
  23. ^ North Indian Notes and Queries, 1896, p 64; ˜The tribes and castes of the north-western provinces and Oudh in four..., 1999, p 206, William Crooke; North Indian Notes and Queries, 1896, p 64, Mythology, Hindu; Jalandhar Settlement Report, p 82, sqq ; Cf: ˜The œtribes and castes of the north-western provinces and Oudh…, 1999 edition, p 206, William Crooke; See also: North Indian Notes and Queries, 1896, p 64, Hindu Mythology; A Glossary of the Tribes & Castes of the Punjab & North-west Frontier Province, 1911, Vol II, p 15, H. A. Rose etc .
  24. ^ See: Multan Gazetteer, 1902, p 138 etc.

References[edit]

  • A Glossary of the Tribes & Castes of the Punjab & North-west Frontier Province, 1883, H. A. Rose
  • The Punjab Castes, 1977 Edition, Denzil Ibbetson
  • The Tribes and Castes of the north-western provinces and Oudh, 1999 edition, p 206, William Crooke
  • The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India, 1995 Edition, R V Russell, R.B.H. Lai
  • North Indian Notes and Queries, 1896, Hindu Mythology
  • The Historical Background of Pakistan and Its People, 1973, Ahmed Abdulla - Pakistan
  • An Observation: Perspective of Pakistan, 1987, Ahmed Abdulla - Pakistan
  • Punjab, the Land of Beauty, Love, and Mysticism, 1992, Syed Abdul Quddus - Punjab (India)
  • The Rajputana Gazetteer, 1879, Rajputana (Agency) - Rajasthan (India)
  • The Legends of the Panjab, 1977, Richard Mercer Dorson, Richard C Temple