Rajaditya Chola

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Rajaditya Chola was an army general and son of the Chola king Parantaka Chola I.[1]

Death[edit]

The Rashtrakutas under Krishna III mounted multiple invasions into the Chola territories between 940 and 950 A.D. In order to ward of the attacks, Rajaditya stationed himself at Takkōlam along with his troops during the latter part of his reign.[2] Takkōlam is a town in Arakkonam taluk of the Vellore district, Tamil Nadu. It is Fourteen K.M from S.E of Arakonam junction.[3][4] In 949-950 A.D., Krishna III would once again mount an attack and Rajaditya would meet him at Takkōlam. Krishna III was aided by his Western Ganga feudatory Butuga II in this battle. The Atagur inscriptions of Krishna III and Butuga II reveal the details of how Rajaditya was treacherously murdered. Atakur or Atagur is a village about 15 miles N.E by E from Mandya, the headquarters of the Mandya taluk in Mysore district.[5] The Canarese inscription is in two parts; the principal portion belonging to Krishna III mentions the Saka date 872 (949-950 A.D) while the subsidiary belongs to Butuga II. Here is an excerpt:

Mūvadi Chōla means thrice powerful similar to Irumudi Chola (twice powerful), Nūrmadi Chola(one hundred times more powerful). The subsidiary engraved on the same slab and belonging to Butuga II throws some more light on the incident:

Historian John Faithfull Fleet of Archaeological Survey of India (1894–1900) decisively says that pretended overtures of peace were made and that Rajaditya was stabbed at a meeting between him and Butuga.[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ American journal of archaeology, Volume 7, page 112
  2. ^ Antiquities of India: an account of the history and culture of ancient Hindustan, page 69: Rashtrakuta Krishna III..was worsted at Takkolam by Rajaditya Chola
  3. ^ History of ancient India, page 461
  4. ^ Epigraphia Indica and record of the Archæological Survey of India, Volume 6, page 53
  5. ^ Epigraphia Indica and record of the Archæological Survey of India, Volume 6, page 52
  6. ^ Epigraphia Indica and record of the Archæological Survey of India, Volume 6, page 55
  7. ^ a b Epigraphia Indica and record of the Archæological Survey of India, Volume 6, page 57

References[edit]

  • American journal of archaeology, Volume 7, American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem, American School of Classical Studies in Rome, Archaeological Institute of America, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, American School for Oriental Study and Research in Palestine
  • Antiquities of India: an account of the history and culture of ancient Hindustan By Lionel David Barnett
  • History of ancient India By Rama Shankar Tripathi
  • Epigraphia Indica and record of the Archæological Survey of India, Volume 6 By Archaeological Survey of India