Ralph Abercromby, 2nd Baron Dunfermline

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Ralph Abercromby, 2nd Baron Dunfermline KCB FRSE (6 April 1803 – 2 July 1868) was a Scottish nobleman and diplomat, styled The Honourable from 1839 to 1858.

Life[edit]

Ralph Abercromby was the son and heir of James Abercromby, the barrister and Whig politician raised to the peerage as Baron Dunfermline on retirement in 1839, and Lady Mary Anne (Marianne) Leigh. Abercomby was educated at Eton and Peterhouse, Cambridge.

He entered the Diplomatic Service, becoming an attaché at Frankfurt in 1821 and a précis writer in the Foreign Office in 1827. He was Secretary of Legation at Berlin from 1831 to 1835, and Minister at Florence from 1835 to 1838. On 18 September 1838 he married Lady Mary Elizabeth (Gilbert) Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, daughter of the Earl of Minto. From 1838 to 1840 he was Minister to the German Confederation, from 1840 to 1851 Minister at Turin, and from 1851 to 1858 Minister at The Hague.[1]

In 1851 he was awarded the KCB. Upon his father's death in 1858 he succeeded to the Barony, and lived at the family home Colinton House, Midlothian (now in Edinburgh). In 1863 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, upon the nomination of Sir John M'Neill.

He died without a male heir in 1868, and the Barony became extinct.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Abercromby, Ralph (ABRY821R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 

External links[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
George Hamilton Seymour
British Resident to Tuscany
1835–1838
Succeeded by
Hon. Henry Fox
Preceded by
Hon. Henry Fox
British Minister to the Germanic Confederation
1838–1840
Succeeded by
Hon. William Fox-Strangways
Preceded by
Augustus Foster
British Minister at Turin
1840–1851
Succeeded by
James Hudson
Preceded by
Sir Edward Cromwell Disbrowe
British Minister to the Netherlands
1851–1858
Succeeded by
The Lord Napier
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
James Abercromby
Baron Dunfermline
1858-1868
Extinct