Ralph Eberhart

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Ralph Eberhart
Eberhart re.jpg
General Ralph E. "Ed" Eberhart
Born (1946-12-06) December 6, 1946 (age 67)
Nevada, Missouri
Allegiance United States United States
Service/branch Seal of the US Air Force.svg United States Air Force
Years of service 1968–2005
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Unit 20th Tactical Air Support Squadron
Commands held North American Aerospace Defense Command
Battles/wars

Gulf War

Vietnam War
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal (2)
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal (2)
Legion of Merit (2)
Distinguished Flying Cross
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Meritorious Service Medal (3)
Air Medal (12)
Air Force Commendation Medal
Combat Readiness Medal
National Defense Service Medal (3)
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (3)
Vietnam Service Medal (4)
Southwest Asia Service Medal (2)
Humanitarian Service Medal (2)
Japanese Order of the Sacred Treasure, First Class
French Legion of Honour, Chevalier Medal
Vietnam Campaign Medal
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)

General Ralph Edward "Ed" Eberhart (born December 6, 1946)[1] was Commander, North American Aerospace Defense Command and United States Northern Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. He was in charge of NORAD on 9/11.

General Eberhart entered the Air Force in 1968 as a graduate of the United States Air Force Academy. His staff experience includes serving as Executive Officer to the Air Force Chief of Staff at Headquarters U.S. Air Force; Deputy Chief of Staff for Inspection, Safety and Security, Headquarters Tactical Air Command; Director for Programs and Evaluation, Headquarters U.S. Air Force; Director of Force Structure, Resources and Assessment, the Joint Staff; and Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force. The general has also served as Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force, Commander, Air Combat Command, Commander, Air Force Space Command, and as Commander in Chief, U.S. Space Command.

General Eberhart has commanded a flight, squadron, wing, numbered air force and two major commands, as well as one sub-unified command, two unified commands and one bi-national command. While Commander of the 363rd Tactical Fighter Wing during Operation Desert Shield, the unit established the theater's initial air-to-ground combat capability from a forward operating location. General Eberhart's international awards include the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, presented while serving as the Commander of U.S. Forces, Japan, by the Emperor of Japan, as well as the French Legion of Honor. A command pilot, General Eberhart has logged more than 5,000 hours, primarily in fighter and trainer aircraft, including 300 combat missions as a forward air controller in Vietnam.

Education[edit]

As Cadet Colonel (left) commanding the Cadet Wing at the United States Air Force Academy, with Colonel Robin Olds (center) and Brigadier General Louis T. Seith, 1967

Assignments[edit]

  1. August 1968 – August 1969, student, undergraduate pilot training, 615th Student Squadron, Air Training Command, Craig AFB, Alabama
  2. February 1970 – December 1970, forward air controller, 20th Tactical Air Support Squadron, Pleiku Air Base, South Vietnam
  3. December 1970 – June 1974, T-38 instructor pilot, assistant flight commander, flight commander and headquarters squadron commander, 71st Flying Training Wing, Vance AFB, Oklahoma
  4. June 1974 – June 1975, resource manager, Air Staff Training Program, Special Category Management Section, Rated Career Management Branch, Headquarters Air Force Military Personnel Center, Randolph AFB, Texas
  5. December 1975 – February 1977, F-4E flight commander and instructor pilot, 525th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Bitburg AB, West Germany
  6. February 1977 – December 1978, F-4E instructor pilot, standardization and evaluation flight examiner, and assistant Chief, Standardization and Evaluation, 50th Tactical Fighter Wing, Hahn AB, West Germany
  7. January 1979 – July 1980, action officer, Readiness Initiative Group, Directorate of Operations, later, Chief, Executive Committee, Air Force Budget Issues Team, Directorate of Plans, Congressional and External Affairs Division, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  8. July 1980 – June 1982, aide to the Commander in Chief, Headquarters U.S. Air Forces in Europe, and Commander, Allied Air Forces Central Europe, Ramstein AB, West Germany
  9. September 1982 – May 1984, Commander, 10th Tactical Fighter Squadron, later, Assistant Deputy Commander for Operations, 50th Tactical Fighter Wing, Hahn AB, West Germany
  10. May 1984 – July 1986, executive officer to the Air Force Chief of Staff, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  11. July 1986 – July 1987, student, National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C.
  12. July 1987 – October 1990, Vice Commander, later, Commander, 363rd Tactical Fighter Wing, Shaw AFB, South Carolina
  13. October 1990 – February 1991, Deputy Chief of Staff for Inspection, Safety and Security, Headquarters Tactical Air Command, Langley AFB, Virginia
  14. February 1991 – February 1994, Director, Directorate of Programs and Evaluation, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  15. February 1994 – June 1995, Director, Force Structure, Resources and Assessment, the Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.
  16. June 1995 – June 1996, Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  17. June 1996 – June 1997, Commander, U.S. Forces, Japan, and Commander, 5th Air Force, Yokota AB, Japan
  18. July 1997 – June 1999, Vice Chief of Staff, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  19. June 1999 – February 2000, Commander, Air Combat Command, Langley AFB, Virginia
  20. February 2000 – April 2002, Commander in Chief, North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Space Command; Commander, Air Force Space Command; and Department of Defense Manager for Manned Space Flight Support Operations, Peterson AFB, Colorado
  21. April 2002 – October 2002, Commander in Chief, North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Space Command, and Department of Defense Manager for Manned Space Flight Support Operations, Peterson AFB, Colorado
  22. October 2002 – January 1, 2005, Commander, North American Aerospace Defense Command and USNORTHCOM (as U.S. Space Command by then ceased to exist and merged into USSTRATCOM), Peterson AFB, Colorado

Flight information[edit]

Ralph Eberhart

Later careers[edit]

Eberhart currently serves on the Segs4Vets Advisory Board.

Awards and decorations[edit]

Bronze oak leaf cluster
Defense Distinguished Service Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with a pair of width-2 white stripes on the edges
Legion of Merit with bronze oak leaf cluster
Distinguished Flying Cross
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with two width-8 white stripes at distance 4 from the edges.
Meritorious Service Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Silver oak leaf cluster
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Medal with two silver and one bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal
Presidential Unit Citation
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Joint Meritorious Unit Award with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with bronze oak leaf cluster
Combat Readiness Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star
Width=44 scarlet ribbon with a central width-4 golden yellow stripe, flanked by pairs of width-1 scarlet, white, Old Glory blue, and white stripes
National Defense Service Medal with two bronze service stars
Bronze star
Bronze star
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with two bronze service stars
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Vietnam Service Medal with three bronze service stars
Bronze star
Width-44 ribbon with the following stripes, arranged symmetrically from the edges to the center: width-2 black, width-4 chamois, width-2 Old Glory blue, width-2 white, width-2 Old Glory red, width-6 chamouis, width-3 myrtle green up to a central width-2 black stripe
Southwest Asia Service Medal with bronze service star
Bronze star
Humanitarian Service Medal with bronze service star
Air Force Overseas Short Tour Service Ribbon
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Overseas Long Tour Service Ribbon with bronze oak leaf cluster
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Longevity Service Award with silver and two bronze oak leaf clusters
Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon
Air Force Training Ribbon
Japanese Order of the Sacred Treasure, First Class
French Legion of Honour, Chevalier Medal
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Award
Vietnam Campaign Medal
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)

Other achievements[edit]

  • Able Aeronaut Award, Pacific Air Forces
  • General Jimmy Doolittle Award, Air Force Association
  • Distinguished Achievement Award, AFA Tennessee Ernie Ford Chapter
  • Member, Council of Foreign Relations
  • Tom Lombardo Leadership Award, National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame
  • Thomas D. White Space Award, AFA
  • Air Force Order of the Sword, Air Force Space Command
  • General Bernard A. Schriever Award, AFA
  • General James V. Hartinger Award, National Defense Industrial Association, Rocky Mountain Chapter

Effective dates of promotion[edit]

Promotions
Insignia Rank Date
US-O10 insignia.svg General August 1, 1997
US-O9 insignia.svg Lieutenant General  July 1, 1995
US-O8 insignia.svg Major General July 1, 1993
US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General March 1, 1991
US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel November 1, 1984
US-O5 insignia.svg Lieutenant Colonel November 1, 1981
US-O4 insignia.svg Major September 1, 1979
US-O3 insignia.svg Captain June 5, 1971
US-O2 insignia.svg First Lieutenant December 5, 1969
US-O1 insignia.svg Second Lieutenant June 5, 1968

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Most information taken from [2].

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Levins, Harry (April 3, 2001). "Air Force General, a Missourian, may be in line to become next Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff". St. Louis Post-Dispatch (Lee Enterprises). p. A3. "He is Gen. Ralph E. 'Ed' Eberhart, a native of Nevada, Mo., who grew up in Ferguson and graduated from McCluer in 1964." 
Military offices
Preceded by
Thomas S. Moorman, Jr.
Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force
1997 - 1999
Succeeded by
Lester Lyles
Preceded by
Richard B. Myers
Commander of the North American Aerospace Defense Command
February 22, 2000 – November 5, 2004
Succeeded by
Timothy J. Keating
Preceded by
first
Commander of the United States Northern Command
October 22, 2002 – November 5, 2004
Succeeded by
Timothy J. Keating