Ramadi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the city. For the district, see Ramadi (district).
Ramadi
Arabic: الرمادي
Ar-Ramādī
The Ramadi Mosque in June 2004
The Ramadi Mosque in June 2004
Ramadi is located in Iraq
Ramadi
Ramadi
Ramadi's location inside Iraq
Coordinates: 33°25′11″N 43°18′45″E / 33.41972°N 43.31250°E / 33.41972; 43.31250
Country  Iraq
Governorate Al Anbar Governorate
Population (2004)
 • Total 483,209

Ramadi (Arabic: الرمادي‎; BGN: Ar Ramādī) is a city in central Iraq, about 110 kilometers (68 mi) west of Baghdad. It is the capital of Al Anbar Governorate.[1] The city extends more than 60 kilometers along the Euphrates and is the largest city in Al-Anbar.

Population[edit]

Ramadi's population has been stated as 500,000 according to UN data from 2003. and 483,209 according to UN from 2004. The former regime reported that it had about 700,000 inhabitants.[2] Until 2008, a vast majority of the inhabitants were Sunni Arabs, mostly from the Dulaim tribe. Since then, however, a large Shia influx has made the city, contrary to Fallujah a more mixed ethnic town.

History[edit]

Ramadi is located in a fertile, irrigated, alluvial plain, within Iraq's Sunni Triangle.[3] It was founded in 1869 under the Ottoman Empire. The main purpose of the city was to give the Ottomans a base for communications with and control of the Dulaim tribe of the region.

Further information: Battle of Ramadi (1917)

During the Mesopotamian Campaign of World War I, British forces under Lieutenant General Frederick Stanley Maude took Ramadi. In November 1917, British forces fought what was left of the Ottoman forces there. General Maude died soon after Ramadi was taken.

During the Anglo-Iraqi War during World War II, Ramadi was held by a brigade-sized unit loyal to Rashid Ali.

Ramadi was a base of insurgency to the U.S. forces between 2003 and 2006.

Ramadi is being contested by Iraq & ISIS as of the 2011 Iraqi insurgency (2011-present)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/iraq/ramadiyah.htmjj.
  2. ^ According to the former regime
  3. ^ Henry Field, and Richard A. (Richard Arthur) Martin, The anthropology of Iraq, Chicago: Field Museum, 1940, p. 17.

External links[edit]


Coordinates: 33°25′N 43°18′E / 33.417°N 43.300°E / 33.417; 43.300