Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda's Ancestral House and Cultural Centre

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Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda's Ancestral House and Cultural Centre
Swami Vivekananda's Ancestral House & Cultural Centre Door
Entrance to the Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda's Ancestral House and Cultural Centre
Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda's Ancestral House and Cultural Centre is located in India
Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda's Ancestral House and Cultural Centre
Former names Swami Vivekananda's ancestral house
Datta ancestral house
General information
Status Active
Type Heritage place, museum
Address 3 Gourmohan Mukherjee Street
Town or city Kolkata
Country India
Coordinates 22°35′10.8″N 88°22′2.5″E / 22.586333°N 88.367361°E / 22.586333; 88.367361
Renovated 2004
Owner Ramakrishna Mission

Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda's Ancestral House and Cultural Centre is a museum and cultural centre. It is located at 3, Gourmohan Mukherjee Street, Kolkata, India.[1] In this house, Swami Vivekananda (then called Narendranath Datta) was born on 12 January 1863.[2] The house remained Vivekananda's home throughout his childhood and early youth.[3][4] The cultural centre was inaugurated by the President of India A. P. J. Abdul Kalam.[5]

History[edit]

After the death of his father (Vishwanath Datta) in 1884, Vivekananda's aunt, who was living with them in that house, claimed full possession of the property. She filed a lawsuit against Vivekananda's mother (Bhuvaneswari Devi) and her family.[3] Vivekananda won the case in the lower court, but the case was appealed to a higher court.[6] The case continued for many years in higher courts. It concluded only a few days before Vivekananda's death in 1902. According to the final ruling in the case, Vivekananda was awarded full legal possession of his ancestral house.

Renovation[edit]

Over time, the ancestral house of Vivekananda became dilapidated. In 1962, Ramakrishna Mission authorities decided to acquire the property and turn it into a museum. In May 1999, the Ramakrishna Mission acquired the land and the adjacent plot through the Government of West Bengal. A committee was set up for this project. The committee managed to amass a fund of INR200 million (US$3.3 million) from Central Government, State Government, and public donations of which INR99 million (US$1.6 million) were granted by the Central Government.[5] In 2004, after renovation, the house was turned into a museum and cultural centre.[1]

Currently, Vivekananda's ancestral home houses a museum, a research centre, a memorial shrine, a library, an English centre, a computer training centre, and a charitable dispensary. Seminars and conventions are also regularly organised here.[4]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Ancestral House of Swami Vivekananda". Indfy. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  2. ^ Chattopadhyay Rajagopal (1 January 1999). Swami Vivekananda in India: A Corrective Biography. Motilal Banarsidass Publ. pp. 28–. ISBN 978-81-208-1586-5. Retrieved 13 January 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Chaturvedi Badrinath (1 June 2006). Swami Vivekananda: The Living Vedanta. Penguin Books India. pp. 2–. ISBN 978-0-14-306209-7. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda’s Ancestral House and Cultural Centre, Swamiji’s House". BM Ramakrishna Mission Swami Vivekananda’s Ancestral House and Cultural Centre, Swamiji’s House. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Datta Ancestral Home - Birthplace of Vivekananda". Press Information Bureau (Government of India). Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  6. ^ Bhawan Singh Rana; Mīnā Agravāla Meena Agrawal (2005). The Immortal Philosopher Of India Swami Vivekananda. Diamond Pocket Books (P) Ltd. pp. 41–. ISBN 978-81-288-1001-5. Retrieved 12 January 2013.