Randall Delgado

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Randall Delgado
Arizona Diamondbacks – No. 48
Pitcher
Born: (1990-02-09) February 9, 1990 (age 24)
Las Tablas, Panama
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
June 17, 2011 for the Atlanta Braves
Career statistics
(through 2014 season)
Win–loss record 14–21
Earned run average 4.28
Strikeouts 259
Teams

Randall Enrique Delgado (born February 9, 1990) is a Panamanian professional baseball pitcher for the Arizona Diamondbacks of Major League Baseball. Delgado previously played for the Atlanta Braves.

Playing career[edit]

Atlanta Braves[edit]

Delgado began the 2011 season with the AA Mississippi Braves. On June 16, 2011, the Braves announced that Delgado would be called up to make his Major League debut in a spot-start against the Texas Rangers on June 17. Delgado was given the opportunity because regular Braves starter Tommy Hanson was scratched due to right shoulder tendinitis.[1] The debut was somewhat shaky for Delgado, as he gave up three runs (one unearned) over four innings of work, taking the loss for the game. Delgado returned to the Mississippi Braves and was later promoted to the Braves' AAA affiliate in Gwinnett. He was called up for the second time in August, once again to start in place of an injured Hanson. Facing the San Francisco Giants he pitched six hitless innings in which he faced the minimum number of batters before giving up a home run to Cody Ross to start the seventh inning and leaving the game. He received a no-decision and was optioned back to Gwinnett the next day.[2]

Randall's first career Major League hit came on April 22, 2012 against the Arizona Diamondbacks off of Ian Kennedy. On July 15, Delgado was optioned to Triple-A Gwinnett.

Arizona Diamondbacks[edit]

After the 2012 season, the Braves traded Delgado with Martín Prado, Nick Ahmed, Zeke Spruill and Brandon Drury to the Arizona Diamondbacks for Justin Upton and Chris Johnson.[3]

Pitching style[edit]

Delgado throws five pitches: a four-seam fastball (90–93 mph), a two-seam fastball (88–91), a curveball (76–79), a changeup (79–83), and an occasional slider to right-handed hitters.[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]