Randy Johnson (third baseman)

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Randy Johnson
Third baseman
Born: (1956-06-10) June 10, 1956 (age 58)
Escondido, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 27, 1982 for the Atlanta Braves
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1984 for the Atlanta Braves
Career statistics
Batting average .267
Home runs 6
Runs batted in 53
Teams

Randall Glenn Johnson (born June 10, 1956) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman. He played three full seasons in the majors with his best year coming in his last season in the ML's where he hit .269 with a team co leading 13 GW RBIs. From 1982 until 1984, for the Atlanta Braves. He also played two seasons in Japan, 1987 and 1988, for the Hiroshima Toyo Carp. He currently serves as the minor league field coordinator for the San Diego Padres.

Amateur career[edit]

Johnson played football and baseball at Palomar College where he was an All State (California) placekicker in 1975 and San Jose State University, where he was an Academic All American in 1978 for baseball. He was drafted in the 11th round of the 1978 Major League Baseball Draft by the New York Mets.

Professional career[edit]

Johnson played in the Mets farm system for two seasons before being traded to the Braves in 1980. He was released by the Braves following the 1985 season, then signed with the San Francisco Giants as a free agent. He played for their top farm club, the Phoenix Firebirds, in 1986 before signing with the Carp.

He later played for the West Palm Beach Tropics in the Senior Professional Baseball Association in 1989-90 and one season in the Australian Baseball League for the Brisbane Bandits in 1991.

Post-playing career[edit]

Since 1989, Johnson has scouted for the Padres, Colorado Rockies, Detroit Tigers and worked for the Oakland Athletics as special assistant to the team's general manager, Billy Beane from 2003 to 2010. In February 2010, he was named the Padres' minor league field coordinator, a job which he will again perform in 2011.[1]

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