Randy Mamola

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Randy Mamola
2005 0408 Randy Mamola.jpg
Randy Mamola
Nationality American
Motorcycle racing career statistics
Grand Prix motorcycle racing
Active years 1979 - 1992
First race 1979 250cc Venezuelan Grand Prix
Last race 1992 500cc South African Grand Prix
First win 1980 500cc Belgian Grand Prix
Last win 1987 500cc San Marino Grand Prix
Team(s) Suzuki, Yamaha, Honda, Cagiva
Championships 0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
151 13 57 5 11 1050

Randy Mamola born (1959-11-10) November 10, 1959 (age 54) in San Jose, California, USA is a former Grand Prix motorcycle road racer. He is considered[by whom?] to be one of the most talented riders never to have won a world championship.

Career[edit]

Randy Mamola in Barcelona (2006)
Mamola piloting the Doubleseater Ducati at Barcelona

Mamola's first 500cc motorcycle Grand Prix race was in Sweden in 1979, riding a Yamaha. His first victory in the 500cc class was at Belgium in 1980. He went on to win a total of 13 Grands Prix, and finished second in the championship four times: in 1980, 1981, 1984 and 1987.[1] During his Grand Prix career he rode for Yamaha, Suzuki, Honda and Cagiva.

Mamola was also well known for being a real crowd pleaser. For example, at the Dutch TT he crashed his bike during warm-up, only to return to the pits to get his spare bike, wheelying and showing off to the crowd during the main race. Another memorable moment occurred at the 1986 French GP while trailing race leader Eddie Lawson, who was too far ahead to catch: Mamola had built up a healthy lead over third place rider, Christian Sarron, and decided to pull an endo on the run-off area at the beginning of the pit straight before rejoining the race. The stunt went unnoticed by track marshals who were mere feet away but it was captured on film by photographer Don Morley. The following weekend, Morely presented Mamola with the photograph, who was thrilled it was caught on film, but Yamaha team manager, Kenny Roberts, was not. Roberts fired Mamola on the spot but eventually relented and reinstated him.[2] After leaving the Roberts team, Mamola signed with Cagiva to help them develop their GP500 race bike. He stayed with the Italian team for three years, but lack of funds hampered the teams success. After sitting out the 1991 season, he returned in 1992 for one last year on a privately supported Yamaha. He has maintained his crowd pleasing manner, often wearing humorous wigs on camera during interviews with riders. He was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2000.

After retiring from racing Mamola did pit lane commentary work with British Eurosport before losing this role in 2009. He is also a mentor for Bradley Smith.[3]

Charity work[edit]

Mamola began raising money for Save the Children in 1986. On visits to Africa, he noticed that motorcycles being used to transport medical supplies to remote areas were breaking down and being abandoned due to poor training and maintenance. In 1996, he became one of the founders of Riders for Health, a charity which provides motorcycles and training to projects which give the population of rural Africa health and medical support. His fund-raising activities include giving passenger rides on a two-seater Ducati MotoGP bike.[1]

Grand Prix career statistics [4][edit]

Points system from 1969 to 1987:

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points 15 12 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1

Points system from 1988 to 1992:

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Points 20 17 15 13 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Class Team Machine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Points Rank Wins
1979 250cc Zago-Yamaha TZ250 VEN
5
GER
2
NAT
2
ESP
8
YUG
10
NED
7
BEL
-
SWE
-
FIN
-
GBR
2
CZE
5
FRA
4
64 4th 0
500cc Zago-Suzuki RG500 VEN
-
AUT
-
GER
-
NAT
-
ESP
-
YUG
-
NED
13
BEL
DNS
SWE
6
FIN
2
GBR
-
FRA
2
29 8th 0
1980 500cc Heron-Suzuki RG500 NAT
NC
ESP
3
FRA
2
NED
5
BEL
1
FIN
4
GBR
1
GER
5
72 2nd 2
1981 500cc Heron-Suzuki RG500 AUT
1
GER
2
NAT
NC
FRA
2
YUG
1
NED
NC
BEL
3
RSM
4
GBR
3
FIN
2
SWE
13
94 2nd 2
1982 500cc HB-Suzuki RG500 ARG
NC
AUT
7
FRA
-
ESP
-
NAT
-
NED
5
BEL
5
YUG
7
GBR
5
SWE
5
RSM
2
GER
1
65 6th 1
1983 500cc HB-Suzuki RG500 RSA
5
FRA
NC
NAT
2
GER
8
ESP
4
AUT
3
YUG
2
NED
4
BEL
3
GBR
3
SWE
7
RSM
5
89 3rd 0
1984 500cc HRC-Honda NS500 RSA
-
NAT
-
ESP
2
AUT
3
GER
3
FRA
3
YUG
2
NED
1
BEL
2
GBR
1
SWE
NC
RSM
1
111 2nd 3
1985 500cc Rothmans-Honda NSR500 RSA
5
ESP
NC
GER
8
NAT
4
AUT
4
YUG
NC
NED
1
BEL
NC
FRA
3
GBR
5
SWE
5
RSM
3
72 6th 1
1986 500cc Lucky Strike-Yamaha YZR500 ESP
4
NAT
2
GER
6
AUT
3
YUG
2
NED
2
BEL
1
FRA
2
GBR
5
SWE
8
RSM
3
105 3rd 1
1987 500cc Lucky Strike-Yamaha YZR500 JPN
1
ESP
6
GER
2
NAT
NC
AUT
2
YUG
2
NED
3
FRA
1
GBR
3
SWE
3
CZE
4
RSM
1
POR
2
BRA
3
ARG
2
158 2nd 3
1988 500cc Cagiva GP500 JPN
NC
USA
-
ESP
-
EXP
-
NAT
7
GER
NC
AUT
NC
NED
NC
BEL
3
YUG
4
FRA
6
GBR
11
SWE
10
CZE
NC
BRA
NC
58 12th 0
1989 500cc Cagiva GP500 JPN
16
AUS
NC
USA
NC
ESP
NC
NAT
DNS
GER
12
AUT
NC
YUG
7
NED
11
BEL
23
FRA
11
GBR
-
SWE
-
CZE
11
BRA
11
33 18th 0
1990 500cc Cagiva GP500 JPN
NC
USA
7
ESP
-
NAT
7
GER
9
AUT
10
YUG
NC
NED
18
BEL
NC
FRA
7
GBR
6
SWE
NC
CZE
11
HUN
NC
AUS
-
55 14th 0
1992 500cc Budweiser-Yamaha YZR500 JPN
5
AUS
8
MAL
7
ESP
8
ITA
10
EUR
9
GER
NC
NED
5
HUN
3
FRA
8
GBR
NC
BRA
10
RSA
NC
45 10th 0

References[edit]

External links[edit]