Ranger (yacht)

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Ranger
Scale model of Ranger (ship, 1937).JPG
A model of the Ranger
Yacht club  New York Yacht Club
Nation  United States
Class J class
Designer(s) Starling Burgess, Olin Stephens
Builder Bath Iron Works
Launched 11 May 1937
Owner(s) Harold Stirling Vanderbilt
Fate Scrapped c.1940
Racing career
Notable victories 1937 America's Cup
America's Cup 1937
Specifications
Length 135 ft 2 in (41.20 m) (LOA)[1]
87 ft (27 m) (LWL)
Beam 20 ft 10 in (6.35 m)
Draft 15 ft (4.6 m)
Displacement 166 tons

Ranger was a J-class racing yacht that successfully defended the 1937 America's Cup, defeating the British challenger Endeavour II 4-0 at Newport, Rhode Island. It was the last time J-class yachts would race for the America's Cup.

Design[edit]

Harold Stirling Vanderbilt funded construction of Ranger, and she was launched on 11 May 1937. She was designed by Starling Burgess and Olin Stephens, and constructed by Bath Iron Works. Stephens would credit Burgess with actually designing Ranger, but the radical departure from conventional J-class design was more likely attributable[by whom?] to Stephens himself.[opinion] Geerd Hendel, Burgess's chief draftsman, also had a hand in drawing many of the plans.

Ranger was constructed according to the Universal Rule that constrained the various dimensions of racing yachts, such as sail area and length. Often referred to as the "super J",[2] Ranger received a rating of 76, the maximum allowed while still adhering to the Universal Rule.

Career[edit]

Ranger raced Endeavour II in the 1937 America's Cup, winning 4–0.

Ranger was scrapped by 1941[3] or 1946[2] – sources differ.

Replica[edit]

Ranger replica at Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta 13 April 2005

Construction of a replica of Ranger was started at Danish Yacht Boatyard (by Royal Denship) in early 2002 and was completed in late December 2003.[4] The original designs were used as the basis for the new boat but were updated to conform to the latest safety regulations and the requirement of the owner to cross oceans in comfort.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "America's Cup Winner A Marvel in Design". Popular Mechanics: 486–487. August 1937. Retrieved 2011-10-15. 
  2. ^ a b "Classic Boat's History of the J Class". Retrieved 2011-10-15. 
  3. ^ "J-Class History: 1938 - 1968 : The War Years and Decline of the Class". Retrieved 2011-10-15. 
  4. ^ "Specifications & Photos of Ranger - SYT". Retrieved 2011-10-15. 

External links[edit]