Rans Designs

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Rans Designs
Industry Aerospace, Bicycles
Genre Private company
Founded 1974
Founder(s) Randy Schlitter
Headquarters Hays, Kansas, United States
Key people CEO Randy Schlitter
Products Light-sport aircraft, kit aircraft, bicycles, tricycles
Website www.rans.com

Rans Designs, previously called Rans Inc. and which the company styles all in capitals as RANS, is an American aircraft and bicycle manufacturer based in Hays, Kansas, United States. The company name is a portmanteau of the first and last names of the company founder, Randy Schlitter. Rans has produced over 3000 aircraft in kit form and as completed aircraft.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

History[edit]

Rans was founded in 1974 as a pedal-powered sail trike and unpowered land yacht manufacturer. Early pedal-powered sail trikes were the Delta SX, Eagle 4, Windhawk and the Monorai. The company was successful in the marketplace, producing over 1500 sail trikes, and also in racing. Even two place tandem pedal-powered sail trikes were produced, like the Rans Gemini. Rans sail trikes were used by such people as avid sailor Bob Hope.[6][13]

After trying hang gliding and considering designing an ultralight sailplane, Schlitter turned his attention to designing an ultralight aircraft. Dissatisfied with the early ultralights available, his S-4 Coyote prototype was commenced in November 1982. Schlitter founded a new company Aero-Max, with investment from a friend to produce the S-4. The S-4 first flew in March 1983, but the company broke up over financial issues and the design fell to Rans to produce.[6][13]

Schlitter kept designing new aircraft and by 2006 had a stable of 12 designs in production. On 1 June 2006 Schlitter ended production of many of the designs to concentrate on the new light-sport aircraft market. In 2010 the line consisted of six basic aircraft designs.[14][15]

Aircraft[edit]

Summary of aircraft built by Rans
Model name First flight Number built/as of Type
Rans S-2 Coyote 1983 1 Single seat, high wing, conventional landing gear ultralight
Rans S-3 Coyote 1983 1 Single seat, high wing, conventional landing gear ultralight
Rans S-4 Coyote 1983 246 (December 1998) Single seat, high wing, conventional landing gear ultralight
Rans S-5 Coyote 1983 included in S-4 total Single seat, high wing, tricycle landing gear ultralight
Rans S-6 Coyote II 1988 1842 (January 2008) Two seat, high wing, tricycle or conventional landing gear light aircraft
Rans S-7 Courier 1985 325 (December 2007) Two seat, high wing, conventional landing gear light aircraft
Rans S-9 Chaos 1986 129 (December 1998) Single seat, mid-wing, conventional landing gear aerobatic ultralight
Rans S-10 Sakota 1988 147 (December 1998) Two seat, mid-wing, conventional landing gear aerobatic light aircraft
Rans S-11 Pursuit 1991 3 (prototypes only) Single seat, low-wing, tricycle landing gear lifting body
Rans S-12 Airaile 1990 1000 (2006) Two seat, high-wing, tricycle landing gear light aircraft
Rans S-14 Airaile 1991 125 (December 2004 Single seat, high-wing, tricycle landing gear ultralight
Rans S-15 Pursuit II Not-built Two-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle landing gear lifting body
Rans S-16 Shekari 1994 22 (December 2004) Two seat, low wing, conventional or tricycle landing gear light aircraft
Rans S-17 Stinger 1996 38 (December 2004) Single seat, high-wing, conventional landing gear, open cockpit ultralight
Rans S-18 Stinger II 2000 30 (December 2004) Two seat, high-wing, conventional landing gear, open cockpit ultralight trainer
Rans S-19 Venterra 2007 11 (November 2010) Two seat, low wing, tricycle landing gear light-sport aircraft
Rans S-20 Raven 2013 1 (January 2014) Two seat, high wing, tricycle or conventional landing gear light-sport bush aircraft

Cycles[edit]

Rans V2 Formula long wheelbase recumbent bicycle fitted with a fairing
Rans V long wheelbase recumbent bicycle

Rans is also known as a manufacturer of upright and recumbent bicycles. In 2011 the bike line included 16 crank forward upright bike models, 14 recumbents, three tandems and one delta tricycle.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cliche, Andre: Ultralight Aircraft Shopper's Guide 8th Edition, pages B-48 & B-97. Cybair Limited Publishing, 2001. ISBN 0-9680628-1-4
  2. ^ Downey, Julia: 1999 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 15, Number 12, December 1998, page 65. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  3. ^ Downey, Julia: 2005 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 21, Number 12, December 2004, page 53. Belvoir Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  4. ^ Downey, Julia: 2008 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 24, Number 12, December 2007, page 69. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  5. ^ Purdy, Don: AeroCrafter - Homebuilt Aircraft Sourcebook, page 238. BAI Communications. ISBN 0-9636409-4-1
  6. ^ a b c Rans (undated). "About Rans". Retrieved 20 November 2010. 
  7. ^ Bertrand, Noel; Rene Coulon; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2003-04, page 157. Pagefast Ltd, Lancaster OK, 2003. ISSN 1368-485X
  8. ^ Taylor, Michael J. H. (1996). Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory. London, England: Brassey's. p. 501. ISBN 1-85753-198-1. 
  9. ^ Taylor, John (ed): Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1984-1985, page 711. Jane's Publishing Company, 1984. ISBN 0-7106-0801-2
  10. ^ Taylor, John (ed): Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1986-1987, pages 701-702. Jane's Publishing Company, 1986. ISBN 0-7106-0835-7
  11. ^ Taylor, John (ed): Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1987-1988, pages 698-699. Jane's Publishing Company, 1987. ISBN 0-7106-0850-0
  12. ^ Taylor, John (ed): Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1988-1989, pages 592-594. Jane's Publishing Company, 1988. ISBN 0-7106-0867-5
  13. ^ a b Rans Designs (undated). "RANS: The Early Years". Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  14. ^ Aero News Network (May 2006). "RANS: Light Sport Aircraft Are The Future". Retrieved 21 November 2010. 
  15. ^ Rans Designs (undated). "Models". Retrieved 29 November 2010. 
  16. ^ Rans Designs (undated). "Rans Bikes". Retrieved 16 May 2011. 

External links[edit]