Raoul Felder

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Raoul Lionel Felder (born in Brooklyn, New York, May 13, 1939) [1] is an American lawyer and matrimonial attorney. Felder has written eight books and has published numerous articles related to matrimonial law, politics and social issues. Felder is listed in New York Law Journal's 100 Most Powerful Lawyers in America and in all editions of Who's Who in America and Who's Who in American Law [2] and was profiled in the cover article of the May, 2008 issue of The New Yorker Magazine.[3]

Life[edit]

Raoul Lionel Felder was born in Brooklyn, New York; his brother Jerome became famous as a songwriter under the pseudonym Doc Pomus,[4] who wrote such songs as Save The Last Dance For Me,Viva Las Vegas, This Magic Moment , etc.. He graduated from New York University School of Law and was admitted to the New York Bar in the same year.

Career in law[edit]

Prior to practising matrimonial Law, Felder was a successful prosecutor. In 1961 he was appointed Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Eastern District of New York and in 1964, appointed Special Assistant U.S. Attorney to argue appeal before U.S. Court of Appeals.

Felder has practiced divorce law for more than forty years, and has represented clients such as Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Robin Givens,[5]Carol Channing, David Merrick, Riddick Bowe, the former Mrs. Carl Sagan, the former Mrs. Tom Clancy, the former Mrs. Patrick Ewing, and the former Mrs. Martin Scorsese. In 2003, he was appointed by Governor to the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct and elected its Chair in 2006.[6]

Felder was made Honorary Police Commissioner by the Police Department of the City of New York in 2000.[7] He was a Member of the Board of Directors of Cop Cares and the New York City Economic Development Committee. He received the Defender of Jerusalem Award from Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir in 1990.

Career in writing and broadcasting[edit]

Felder has written eight books, including Bare Knuckle Negotiation (Wiley & Sons), Getting Away with Murder (Simon & Schuster) a book on domestic violence, Divorce:The Way Things Are, Not the Way Things Should Be (World Publishing Co.), Lawyers Guide to Equitable Distribution, (Legis Press), as well as Schmucks: Our Favorite Fakes, Frauds, Lowlifes, Liars, the Armed and Dangerous, and Good Guys Gone Bad (Harper Collins) written with comedian and friend Jackie Mason. As a columnist, his articles on both legal and non legal issues, have appeared in many publications including in The New York Times, New York Post, New York Daily News, Washington Times, Newsday, Newsweek Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Penthouse (an essay on Organized Crime), and was a weekly columnist for Fame Magazine and Gotham.

Felder can frequently be heard and seen on Radio and TV. He was a Weekly Legal Commentator on CNN and was one of the original Board of Advisors on Court TV. He has been interviewed regularly on virtually all TV stations on legal issues, on major American and European TV shows including Larry King Live, 20/20, Nightline, Today Show, Good Morning America, Crossfire, 60 Minutes, Fox News Live, Fox and Friends, Hannity and Colmes, The O'Reily Factor, The Oprah Winfrey Show, Greta Van Sustern, etc.; He was the Host of Crossing the Line - a weekly national public TV show dealing with current events; Moderator, The Felder Report, a series of six specials on WLIW-TV; Host of weekly TV program Metrolaw (discussion and interviews on the law) on MSG Learning Channel, a legal panel show (1996–98). On radio he hosted the BBC worldwide weekly radio show - The American Perspective (1995–96); Accredited as BBC Correspondent for O.J. Simpson case; Moderator and/or host and/or guest of radio shows in U.S. and Britain; Host and moderator of THE FELDER REPORT, nationally syndicated Talk America Radio Network 1998-2001.


Books written by Raoul Felder[edit]

  • DIVORCE: THE WAY THINGS ARE, NOT THE WAY THINGS SHOULD BE, published by World Publishing Company (1971)
  • LAWYERS GUIDE TO EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION, published by Legis Press, Ltd. (1988)
  • ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MATRIMONIAL CLAUSES, a currently published professional book with 27 updated releases, National Law Journal Press (1990–2003)
  • GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER, Simon & Schuster, (published March 1996) (Co-Author) (book concerning domestic violence, published in hard and soft cover)[7]
  • BARE KNUCKLE NEGOTIATION (Book of the Month Club Alternate Selection), published by Wiley & Sons (2004)
  • REFLECTION IN A MIRROR: OF LOVE, LOSS, DEATH AND DIVORCE (A MEMOIR), published by Barricade Books (October 19, 2012)

Books written with Jackie Mason[edit]

  • GUIDE TO NEW YORK AND LOS ANGELES RESTAURANTS, Dove Books (1998)
  • SURVIVAL GUIDE TO NEW YORK, Avon Books (1997)[8]
  • SCHMUCKS!: Our Favorite Fakes, Frauds, Lowlifes, Liars, the Armed and Dangerous, and Good Guys Gone Bad, Harper Collins (April 2007)

Legal articles[edit]

  • "Grounds For Divorce", "Property Settlement" and "Children and Divorce", McGraw-Hill (1972)
  • "Choice of Forum: Family Court vs. Supreme Court", published in a collection of Articles in book entitled New York Matrimonial Practice published by The Practicing Law Institute (1978)
  • "Scullduggery and Other Inequities", Cardozo Law Journal (1986)
  • "A History of New York Divorce Law in the Last Hundred Years", New York Law Journal (1988)

Op-Ed contributor[edit]

Newsweek, Newsday, New York Times, New York Post

Editorial articles[edit]

  • Cosmopolitan (1992)
  • Penthouse (1993)
  • Monthly Columnist, Fame Magazine (1988–1994)
  • Monthly Columnist, Gotham Magazine (2002–present)
  • Something Fishy in East Hampton, Gotham Magazine [9]
  • Monthly Columnist, Washington Times
  • Monthly Columnist (Love and the Law)
  • Monthly Columnist, American Spectator Magazine (2000–01)
  • Columnist, American Spectator on Line (2000–01)
  • Columnist, American Woman Magazine (1994)
  • Weekly Columnist, New York Daily News, on the O.J. Simpson Trial (1996)
  • American Spectator Magazine (2000–01), American Spectator On-Line (2000–01)
  • Jewish Press
  • New York City Lights Drowned Innocence and Found Bravery, Washington Times (2000–01)
  • Diallo Show's Over, So Go On Home, New York Post (3/25/99)
  • Where Have You Found Romance?, Travel & Leisure (2/99)
  • Two-Fisted Lawyering—I'm Paid To Be Rude, New York Times [10]
  • A United Germany Couldn't Be Trusted, Newsday [11]
  • New York Prepares For Bill's Big Day, New York Post [12]
  • The Sex Shop Crackdown- It's About Time, Daily News [13]
  • The Misery Broker, New Yorker Magazine, May 2003 [14]
  • Subject of Profiles in Vanity Fair, Gentlemen's Quarterly, Today Show, Theater Arts, People Magazine, etc.

Media[edit]

  • Weekly Commentator, Legal Subjects on CNN
  • Commentator, Talk America Radio Network Weekly Program
  • Commentator, BBC Radio weekly program worldwide
  • Commentator, The American Perspective, BBC Radio
  • Member, Board of Advisors, Court TV
  • The Felder Report (Metro Channel)
  • Crossing the Line
Guest appearances

Larry King Live, 20/20, Today Show, Good Morning America, Crossfire, 60 Minutes, Fox News Live, Fox and Friends, Hannity and Colmes, The O'Reilly Factor, The Verdict with Dan Abrams, Greta Van Sustern, Geraldo, Showbiz Tonight, CNN Morning Show, The Early Show, Good Day New York, MSNBC Prime, Inside Edition, Access Hollywood, Fox 5 News, Fox Weekend Live, CNN Headline News, Bloomberg News, Neil Cavuto Show, CBS Evening News, ABC Nightline, Hollywood Heat, E! News Daily, Ledger On The Law-KTLK AM1150

Honors and appointments[edit]

  • Chairman of the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct (elected 2006-08)
  • Member of the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct (appointed by Governor Pataki)
  • Examiner, Appellate Division to the Character and Fitness Committee
  • Member of the New York City Cultural Affairs Advisory Board (appointed by Mayor Giuliani)
  • Member of the Board of Directors of the NYC Economic Development Corporation
  • Member of the State Commission on Child Abuse (appointed by Governor Pataki)

Websites[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Raoul Felder, personal website.
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ [4]
  6. ^ [5]
  7. ^ [6]

External links[edit]