Rated R (Queens of the Stone Age album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Rated R
Studio album by Queens of the Stone Age
Released June 6, 2000
Recorded December 1999 - February 2000 at Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, California
Genre Stoner rock[1]
Length 42:10
Label Interscope
Producer Chris Goss, Joshua Homme
(credited as The Fififf Teeners)
Queens of the Stone Age chronology
The Split CD
(1998)
Rated R
(2000)
Songs for the Deaf
(2002)
Alternative covers
Cover of the LP release
Alternative covers
Cover of the 2010 Deluxe Edition
Singles from Rated R
  1. "The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret"
    Released: August 7, 2000
  2. "Feel Good Hit of the Summer"
    Released: 2000
  3. "Monsters in the Parasol"
    Released: 2000 (promotional)
  4. "Never Say Never"
    Released: 2000 (promotional)

Rated R (also called R or Rated X on vinyl) is the second studio album by American rock band Queens of the Stone Age, released on June 6, 2000 on Interscope Records. Rated R was a critical and commercial success and became the band's breakthrough album. It peaked at number 16 on the Top Heatseekers and reached high positions on charts worldwide. The album has been certified gold in the United Kingdom. Three singles were released from it: "The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret", "Feel Good Hit of the Summer" and "Monsters in the Parasol", with the first helping Queens of the Stone Age reach mainstream popularity.

Rated R is the band's first album to feature bass guitarist Nick Oliveri and vocalist Mark Lanegan.

Overview and background[edit]

The band began work on Rated R after touring in support of its previous album, Queens of the Stone Age, released in 1998. As a whole, the album contains numerous references to drugs and alcohol. This is particularly prominent on the opening track, "Feel Good Hit of the Summer", which mostly consists of the repeated line "Nicotine, valium, vicodin, marijuana, ecstasy and alcohol" followed by "c-c-c-c-c-cocaine". The MPAA's "R-rated" symbol features on the album's cover, along with the text "RESTRICTED TO EVERYONE, EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME". Keeping with this theme, the album's liner notes contain warning messages for each song, in the style of the warning messages given to parents on video and DVD boxes: "Auto Pilot", for example, contains "Alcohol and Sleep Deprivation".[2] Also, the album cover is based on MPAA's rating bumper that was shown in the '70s and '80s. Ironically, the title and subtext was meant as a jab at record label Interscope, whose persistence that some of the albums themes would be too controversial and warrant a PMRC warning sticker actually allowed the band to sell the album without one by circumventing all censorship policies.

"Monsters in the Parasol" originally appeared on a Desert Sessions album, Volume 4: Hard Walls and Little Trips, under the slightly different title of "Monster in the Parasol". "Tension Head" is a re-recording of the song "13th Floor", which originally appeared on Mondo Generator's debut album Cocaine Rodeo.

The drum, bass, guitars and vocals to the song "Quick and to the Pointless" were recorded simultaneously in just one take. Nick Oliveri's vocal performance was originally intended to be a scratch vocal, but the band liked it so much that this original recording remained on the finished song. There are also 2 verses in Dutch.[3]

Josh Homme has stated that his favorite song from the album is "I Think I Lost My Headache", which he describes as being about "Paranoia... when you think something strange is going on, and everyone around you is so adamant about telling you it's fine... but then you start thinking 'Wouldn't that be exactly what you'd say if you didn't want me to know, and there is something going on?' And so it's kind of about that paranoid mentality which maybe I have sometimes."[4] The song switches between a standard 4/4 time signature and the unconventional 15/8.

Rated R also marked the first appearance of guest vocalist Mark Lanegan of Screaming Trees, who has appeared on every Queens album since. Lanegan sang lead vocals on "In the Fade" and provided backing vocals for "Auto Pilot", "Leg of Lamb" and "I Think I Lost My Headache".

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[5]
Stylus Magazine B−[6]
Pitchfork Media 8.6/10[7]
Mojo 5/5 stars[8]
The Guardian 4/5 stars [9]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[10]
NME 9/10[11]
IGN 9.3/10[12]
Q 4/5 stars[13]
Uncut 4/5 stars[14]
Melody Maker 4/5 stars[15]
Consequence of Sound 4/5 stars[16]
Drowned in Sound 10/10 stars[17]

Rated R was the band's breakout album in the UK. Upon its release in June 2000, the album peaked at number 16 on the Top Heatseekers album chart. It granted Queens of the Stone Age recognition in the United Kingdom and has been certified silver by the British Phonographic Industry.[18][19][20]

Feel Good Hit of the Summer audio sample

Problems playing this file? See media help.

Steve Huey from AllMusic said "R is mellower, trippier, and more arranged than its predecessor, making its point through warm fuzz-guitar tones, ethereal harmonies, vibraphones, horns, and even the odd steel drum. That might alienate listeners who have come to expect a crunchier guitar attack, but even though it's not really aggro, R is still far heavier than the garage punk and grunge that inform much of the record. It's still got the vaunted Arizona-desert vibes of Kyuss, but it evokes a more relaxed, spacious, twilight feel, as opposed to a high-noon meltdown. Mark Lanegan and Barrett Martin of the Screaming Trees both appear on multiple tracks, and their band's psychedelic grunge - in its warmer, less noisy moments - is actually not a bad point of comparison."[21]

Rated R included the hit single "The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret", which was released in the summer of 2000 and became arguably the band's most recognizable and popular song at its time of release. Not only did its music video receive mild airplay on music television, the song was featured in the Entourage episode "I Love You Too" (from Season 2). It was also the only single from the album to get a chart position, reaching number 21 on the Mainstream Rock chart, number 36 on the Modern Rock chart and number 31 on the UK Singles Chart.[18][19]

Rhapsody called it the best rock album of the decade on its "Rock’s Best Albums of the Decade" list.[22]

Rolling Stone named it 82nd best album of the decade.

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Joshua Homme and Nick Oliveri, except where noted. Lead vocals by Homme, except where noted.

No. Title Writer(s) Lead vocals Length
1. "Feel Good Hit of the Summer"       2:43
2. "The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret"       3:36
3. "Leg of Lamb"       2:48
4. "Auto Pilot"     Nick Oliveri 4:01
5. "Better Living Through Chemistry"       5:49
6. "Monsters in the Parasol"   Homme, Mario Lalli   3:27
7. "Quick and to the Pointless"     Nick Oliveri 1:42
8. "In the Fade" (Includes a reprise of the first track "Feel Good Hit of the Summer") Homme, Mark Lanegan Mark Lanegan 4:25
9. "Tension Head"     Nick Oliveri 2:52
10. "Lightning Song"   Dave Catching (Instrumental) 2:07
11. "I Think I Lost My Headache"       8:40
Total length:
42:10
  • Most European editions separate "In the Fade" and the "Feel Good Hit of the Summer" reprise into two tracks, 3:51 and 0:34 in length. The track listing on the back cover remains the same as on the regular edition, which means that it does not match the actual track numbers from that point on.
  • In the liner notes, it states "'Better Living Through Chemistry' chorus inspired by Björk"; it borrows lyrics from the chorus on "Crying" on her Debut album.[23]

Bonus tracks[edit]

  • "Ode to Clarissa" (Homme, Oliveri) – 2:40
    • Included as track #12 on the Japanese version and Rated R (X Rated), the limited LP release of the album. This song was also released on the "The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret" single.

Special edition[edit]

The UK only special edition of the album included a bonus disc, titled Rated U, which was also separately issued as the "Feel Good Hit of the Summer" single. Along with "Feel Good Hit of the Summer" and its video, it featured three newly recorded songs.

2010 re-issue[edit]

In an interview with NME, Josh Homme revealed plans of a re-issue of Rated R which would feature B-side recordings and live performance from Reading Festival.[24] It was released on August 3, 2010.[25]

Added to the original album is a second disc with six B-sides and the band's summer 2000 Reading Festival concert—featuring nine previously unreleased songs, including live versions of Rated R's "Feel Good Hit of the Summer", "The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret", "Better Living Through Chemistry" and "Quick and to the Pointless".

The B-sides are "Ode to Clarissa", "You're So Vague", covers of Romeo Void's "Never Say Never" and The Kinks' "Who'll Be the Next in Line", a live version of the album's "Monsters in the Parasol", a song originally from Josh Homme's side project, The Desert Sessions, and a re-recording of "Born to Hula", an early song from Kyuss/Queens of the Stone Age EP. The other Reading Festival tracks are concert takes on "Ode to Clarissa", three songs from the band's debut album ("Regular John", "Avon" and "You Can't Quit Me, Baby"), and "You Think I Ain't Worth a Dollar, But I Feel Like a Millionaire", another track originally by The Desert Sessions, which was also present on their third album, Songs for the Deaf.

Personnel[edit]

  • Josh Homme – vocals, guitar, percussion (tracks 3, 8), drums (track 4), piano (track 10), backing vocals (track 4), producer, mixing, concept
  • Nick Oliveri – bass, percussion (track 8), guitar (track 4), vocals (tracks 4, 7, 9), backing vocals (tracks 1, 2, 5, 6, 11), concept, art conception
  • Dave Catching – electric piano (tracks 1, 2, 8), piano (track 5), B3 (track 4), guitar (tracks 6, 7), 12-string guitar (track 10), lap steel (tracks 1, 11)
  • Nick Lucero – drums (tracks 2, 3, 5, 8, 11), percussion (track 3, 4)
  • Gene Trautmann – drums (tracks 1, 6, 7, 9)
  • Chris Goss – bass (track 4), percussion (track 1), backing vocals (tracks 4, 5, 6), producer, grand piano (track 1), noise piano (track 2)
  • Mark Lanegan – vocals (track 8), backing vocals (tracks 4, 11)
  • Barrett Martin – percussion (tracks 5, 10), steel drum (track 11), vibes (tracks 2, 5)
  • Mike Johnson – backing vocals (track 3)
  • Peter Stahl – backing vocals (track 2)
  • Rob Halford – backing vocals (track 1)
  • Nick Eldorado – backing vocals (tracks 1, 7)
  • Wendy Rae Fowler (Wendy Ray Moan) – backing vocals (tracks 1, 7)
  • Scott Mayo – horns (track 11), baritone sax (track 2)
  • Fernando Pullum – horns (track 11), flugal horn (track 7)
  • Reggie Young – horns (track 11)
  • Bradley Cook – engineer
  • Martin Schmelzle – engineer, sequencing, assembly
  • Trina Shoemaker – engineer, mixing
  • Dan Druff – guitar technician
  • Marek – noise (track 8), mixing
  • Robert Brunner – pre-production assistant
  • Francesca Restrepo – art direction

Charts[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rated R". All Music. Retrieved 4 November 2014. The second Queens of the Stone Age album, Rated R (as in the movie rating; its title was changed from II at the last minute before release), makes its stoner rock affiliations clear right from the opening track. 
  2. ^ Liner notes
  3. ^ josh homme talking about quick and to the pointless - YouTube
  4. ^ josh homme talking about i think i lost my headache - YouTube
  5. ^ "Rated R - Queens of the Stone Age". AllMusic. 
  6. ^ "Queens Of The Stone Age - Rated R - Review". Stylus. 
  7. ^ "Queens of Stone Age: Rated R [Deluxe Edition]". Pitchfork Media. 
  8. ^ Mojo (Publisher) (p. 110) - 5 stars out of 5 -- "RATED R leaps instantly out of its genre packet into a world where polka rhythms, free jazz and punk rock ramalama share airspace with repetitive Kraut-metal riffing..."
  9. ^ "Pop roundup". The Guardian. 
  10. ^ "Queens of the Stone Age - Rated R". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 2009-04-30. Retrieved 2012-01-25. 
  11. ^ "'Rated R'". NME. 
  12. ^ "Queens Of The Stone Age - Rated R". IGN. 
  13. ^ Q (9/00, p. 111) - 4 stars out of 5 - "... [A] mighty record.... [They] may well have a sleeper hit on their hands..."
  14. ^ Uncut (10/00, p. 88) - 4 stars out of 5 - "... A revved-up jet engine of twisted Sabbath riffs and taut Krautrock rhythms..."
  15. ^ Melody Maker (6/27/00, p. 75) - 4 stars out of 5 - "... No mess. No fuss. Just 12 songs of good, solid rock. Rock with all the [b.s. ] stripped away....100 per cent unapologetic metal...".
  16. ^ Coplan, Chris (2010-08-18). "Queens of the Stone Age – Rated R [Deluxe Edition] | Album Reviews". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved 2014-05-18. 
  17. ^ Nettleton, Chris (2000-10-22). "Album Review: Queens of The Stone Age - Rated R / Releases / Releases // Drowned In Sound". Drownedinsound.com. Retrieved 2014-05-18. 
  18. ^ a b c d "British Album/Single Chart". Chart Stats. Archived from the original on 2012-05-30. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  19. ^ a b c d "Artist Chart History - Queens of the Stone Age". Billboard. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  20. ^ a b "Certified Awards Search" (To access, enter the search parameter "Queens of the Stone Age", select "Search by Artist" and check the "Exact match" checkbox.). British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved April 15, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Allmusic - Rated R Review". Allmusic. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  22. ^ "Rock’s Best Albums of the Decade" Retrieved 12 January 2010.
  23. ^ (Bjork - Crying) 2:01
  24. ^ Queens Of The Stone Age to reissue 'Rated R' album | News | NME.COM
  25. ^ Amazon.com: Rated R - Deluxe Edition: Queens of the Stone Age: Music
  26. ^ "Chartverfolgung / QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE / Longplay". musicline.de. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  27. ^ "Norwegian Album Chart". norwegiancharts. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  28. ^ "Accreditations – 2003 Albums". Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved April 15, 2013.