List of Pokémon (1–51)

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The Pokémon franchise has 719 (as of the release of Pokémon X and Y) distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokémon. This is a selected listing of 51 of the Pokémon species, originally found in the Red and Green versions, arranged as they are in the main game series' National Pokédex.

Bulbasaur[edit]

Number: 001 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Ivysaur
Main article: Bulbasaur

Bulbasaur (フシギダネ?, Fushigidane), the Seed Pokémon, are small, squat reptilian and frog Pokémon that move on all four legs, and have light blue-green bodies with darker blue-green spots. As a Bulbasaur undergoes evolution into Ivysaur and then later into Venusaur, the bulb on its back blossoms into a large flower.[1] In the Pokémon anime, the character Ash Ketchum has a Bulbasaur who is portrayed as being brave but also stubborn. His Bulbasaur is also shown not wanting to evolve into Ivysaur.

Ivysaur[edit]

Number: 002 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Bulbasaur Evolves into: Venusaur

Ivysaur (フシギソウ Fushigisō?, Fushigisou), known as the Seed Pokémon, represents the evolved form of Bulbasaur, one of the three starting Pokémon available to players in Pokémon Red and Blue and their various remakes; it evolves into the final form of Venusaur. Aside from becoming taller and heavier than Bulbasaur, its trademark bulb becomes a pink flower-bud, and four leaves now appear at the base of this bud. The Pokémon's legs are more stout, allowing it to hold up the bigger bulb, yet limiting its previous ability to stand on its hind legs.[2] Its eyes now look more aggressive and intimidating. As before, Ivysaur and its bulb share a mutualistic relationship; bathing in sunlight allows both to continue growing.[3] Eventually, the bud will give off a sweet scent, a signal that it will bloom soon, and that its host will evolve. An Ivysaur will spend more time bathing in sunlight in order to reach evolution.[4]

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Ivysaur is a playable character, under the command of the Pokémon Trainer.[5] The Trainer also has Squirtle and Charizard, all three of which can be switched between; unlike the other fighters, these Pokémon become fatigued and consequently weaker, and must be switched out long enough to recover.[5] In the animated series, Ivysaur first appears in the 51st episode (Bulbasaur '​s Mysterious Garden) of the Original Series. Numerous Bulbasaur are seen evolving into Ivysaur, except for Ash Ketchum's Bulbasaur, who refuses to. Ash's friend May, however, has a young female Bulbasaur that evolves into Ivysaur, then into Venusaur.

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, the character Red receives a Bulbasaur from Professor Oak, which he nicknames Saur.[6] In Chapter 15, "Wartortle Wars", it evolves into an Ivysaur after battling a wild Mankey.[7] In Chapter 30, "Zap, Zap, Zapdos!", Red uses Saur to defeat Lt. Surge's Zapdos.[8] In Chapter 33, "The Winged Legends", Red's Ivysaur evolves into a Venusaur to team up with Blue's Charizard and Green's Blastoise.[9]

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston called Ivysaur the "middle child" of the Bulbasaur evolutionary line, due to it not being as cute as Bulbasaur, yet not as intimidating as Venusaur. However, he described him as a necessary step in the line.[10] An editor for UGO Networks called Ivysaur lame in Brawl and stated that while it was better than Squirtle it was inferior to Charizard.[11] Salon '​s Nick Gillespie called Ivysaur "a blue-green toad with what looks to be a garlic clove on its back".[12] IGN's Lucas M. Thomas and Matt Casamassina wrote that because Chikorita used Razor Leaf in Brawl, Ivysaur likely won't, which they found strange since Ivysaur is "an older and more venerable monster" than Chikorita.[13] Thomas wrote that Ivysaur was proof that four-legged characters can work in Super Smash Bros.[14] IGN's Richard George wrote that Ivysaur in Brawl is "likely to be underestimated at first, but it has some great moves when used properly".[15] IGN editor Lucas M. Thomas wrote it was less recognized than Bulbasaur and Venusaur until it appeared in Brawl. He described it as a "beast to deal with" and as "not too shabby for a monster formerly only known as an in-betweener".[16]

Venusaur[edit]

Number: 003 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Ivysaur Evolves into: Mega Venasaur(X&Y only) with Mega stone
Main article: Venusaur

Venusaur (フシギバナ?, Fushigibana), is the Seed Pokémon. It is the final stage in Bulbasaur evolution. The seed finally bloomed into a huge flower, vaguely resembling a Rafflesia. The flower constantly draws in sunlight for nutrition, characterized by vivid colors and a soothing aroma, and power, which is much more substantial in the summer.[17][18] They are always on the move to absorb more sunlight, though they usually remain quiet and still while absorbing it.[19] After it rains, the aroma is much stronger, which attracts other Pokémon.[20]

Charmander[edit]

Number: 004 Type: Fire Evolves from: None Evolves into: Charmeleon
Main article: Charmander

Charmander (ヒトカゲ?, Hitokage) first appeared in the video games Pokémon Red and Blue and subsequent sequels, later appearing in various merchandise, spinoff titles and animated and printed adaptations of the franchise. Charmander is known as the Lizard Pokémon. Charmander are small, bipedal lizard-like Pokémon. Most have blue eyes, red-orange skin, Four-clawed toes, yellow bellies, and yellow soles under its feet. The end of a Charmander's tail is alight with a flame, and the flame's size reflects both the physical health[21] and the emotions of the individual.[22] When it rains, steam is said to spout from the tip of its tail.[23] If the flame were to ever go out, the Charmander would die.[24] When Charmander receives enough experience from battles, it evolves into Charmeleon, and later Charizard.

Charmeleon[edit]

Number: 005 Type: Fire Evolves from: Charmander Evolves into: Charizard

Charmeleon (リザード Rizādo?, Lizardo) is the evolved form of Charmander, and the pre-evolved form of Charizard. Charmeleon, known as the Flame Pokémon, are bipedal lizard Pokémon, that have yellow bellies and soles, three clawed feet and hands, and bear a flame at the end of their tails. They are darker-skinned than Charmander, now possess a bumpy horn on their heads, and take on a more intimidating appearance. Indeed, Charmeleon are excessively savage and short-tempered by nature,[25] and they are powerful fighters due to their temperament. The flame on its tail may burn a bluish white when the Pokémon is excited,[26] and the air temperature often raises to very high levels when the tail flame is waved around.[27] It first appears in Pokémon Red and Blue.

In the animated series, Ash Ketchum's Charmander evolved into a Charmeleon after stopping a stampede of Exeggutor. Afterwards, its personality is temporarily changed and ignored Ash's commands, as well as using Flamethrower on him many times. It soon evolved into a Charizard during a fight with an Aerodactyl in order to keep up with the winged foe (not so much to save the Pokémon's captive, Ash). The evolution did not improve Charizard's personality in any way, and Ash struggled for some time to get the Pokémon to listen to him once more. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Blue receives a Charmander from his grandfather Professor Oak. It evolves into a Charmeleon, and when Blue is possessed by a Gastly in the Lavender Tower, so is Charmeleon. Blue's Charmeleon is eventually released from its possession only to be faced down by an Arbok, owned by Koga. Charmeleon tricked Koga by using a zombie Psyduck to deflect Arbok's acid attack before literally slicing the Arbok in half with his tail. Blue later appears with an evolved Charizard and gains access to Saffron City by helping to disable a barrier created by a Mr. Mime.[28]

Since appearing in the Pokémon series, Charmeleon has received generally positive reception. It has been featured in several forms of merchandise, including figures, plush toys, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. Charmeleon, along with Pikachu, was featured as one of two Pokémon-themed costumes released in 1999.[29] Grey School of Wizardry faculty member Ash DeKirk compared Charmeleon, along with Charmander and Charizard as "fire-breathing dragons".[30] Author Loredana Lipperini described Charmeleon as an "awkward teenager, full of potential but also of uncertainty."[31] The SCP Journal commented that the Charmander line, which includes Charmeleon, represent the three stages of a dragon's life.[32] Author Joseph Jay Tobin used the line as an example of a line whose names are "rich in cute puns and in a pseudo-Linnean attention to family and genus".[33] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared Charmeleon to Ivysaur in how they both lack the cutesy appeal of their previous forms, but are not as intimidating as their next forms. He also comments that Charmeleon, in spite of being named after the lizard chameleon, "sticks to one lifestyle - burning rage."[34] In a poll by Official Nintendo Magazine, Charmeleon was voted as one of the best Fire-type Pokémon. They stated "Charmeleon may have lost Charmander's cheery smile but it gained so much in evolution".[35] The Daily Cardinal called Charmeleon the "ugliest dragon of the bunch".[36]

Charizard[edit]

Number: 006 Type: Fire/Flying, Dragon (Mega Charizard X) Evolves from: Charmeleon Evolves into: Mega Charizard X)
Main article: Charizard

Charizard (リザードン Rizādon?, Lizardon) is the evolved form of Charmeleon, which is the evolved form of Charmander. Whereas its pre-evolutions Charmander and Charmeleon are ground-bound lizard like creatures, Charizard resembles a large traditional European dragon.[37] Despite the resemblance, Charizard is explicitly a Fire/Flying-type, not a Dragon-type.[38] Charizard have two wings that are blue, while the back is orange, as with the most of its body. Its belly and soles are cream-colored, while their eyes are light blue in color. The video games describe Charizard as having wings that can carry them close to an altitude of 4,600 feet,[39] flying proudly around the sky and constantly seeking for powerful opponents to quarrel with.[40] They can breathe intense flames that can melt any material, but will never torch a weaker foe.[41] If Charizard become angry, the flame at the tip of their tail can flare up in a whitish-blue color.[42] Because of their reckless behavior, Charizard are known to unintentionally cause wildfires.[43]

Squirtle[edit]

Number: 007 Type: Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Wartortle
Main article: Squirtle

Squirtle (ゼニガメ?, Zenigame) is the Tiny Turtle Pokémon. They are cute-looking turtle Pokémon, capable of moving either on two feet or on all fours. Their skin is a light blue, and they possess a long, curled tail. When feeling threatened, Squirtle withdraw their limbs into their brown-orange shells and spray water from their mouth with great force, either to attack their opponent or merely to intimidate it.[44] If attacked anyway, their shells are extremely resilient, and provide excellent protection. It shelters itself in its shell, then strikes back with spouts of water at every opportunity.[45] Squirtle's shell is not merely used for protection. The shell's rounded shape and the grooves on its surface help minimize resistance in water, enabling this Pokémon to swim at high speeds.[46]

Wartortle[edit]

Number: 008 Type: Water Evolves from: Squirtle Evolves into: Blastoise

Wartortle (カメール Kamēru?, Kameil), known as the Turtle Pokémon, is the evolved form of Squirtle. It has a slightly more intimidating appearance; aside from an increased height and weight, it now has darker skin, possesses meaner eyes with smaller pupils, and bears two small outer fangs. Its shell may receive battle scars, from battles that these Pokémon more willingly seek out.[47] A Wartortle also gets a pair of feathery ears, and its tail becomes white, fluffy, and too long to completely hide within its shell;[48] these appendages greatly aid this Pokémon in swimming, acting as oars and/or fins.[49] The tail also happens to be a highly valued collectors' item, which has caused people to hunt this Pokémon, dwindling their numbers. The reason for such poaching may very well be that a Wartortle tail is a symbol of longevity in the Pokémon world, supposedly allowing the creature to live for thousands of years.[50]

In the anime, the first appearance of a Wartortle is when a wild one runs into Ash Ketchum and his friends on Cinnabar Island, seeking help for its clan of Squirtle, Wartortle, and a leading Blastoise, all mysteriously stricken with sleepiness.[51] More Wartortle appear as firefighting Pokémon, and Ash's Squirtle, being an honorary firefighter of its hometown, forms a rivalry with the leader. Finally, another of Ash's traveling companions, May received her own Squirtle from Professor Oak in The Right Place and the Right Mime. May's Squirtle was very young and timid, until evolving before staging a hero's welcome. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Green had a Wartortle, which had evolved from a Squirtle she stole from Professor Oak. Just like Green, it also has a tricky personality. It has since evolved into Blastoise.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared it to Ivysaur and Charmeleon, describing it as a pit stop to a more powerful Pokémon.[52]

Blastoise[edit]

Number: 009 Type: Water Evolves from: Wartortle Evolves into: None
Main article: Blastoise

Blastoise (カメックス Kamekkusu?, Kamex) is the Shellfish Pokémon, and the final stage in Squirtle evolution. It takes on an appearance radically different from its previous forms; the most obvious change is the addition of two retractable cannons on its shell that blast through thick steel. It is also a girthier and more imposing figure: the shape of its head is completely reformed; its limbs are now stout and segmented, bearing visible claws; and its once sought-after tail is short and somewhat stubby. The afore-mentioned cannon spouts are remarkable adaptations, allowing a Blastoise to shoot water with great power and accuracy. The jets of water it spouts from the rocket cannons on its shell can punch through thick steel,[53] while their bullets of water can precisely nail tin cans from a distance of over 160 feet.[54] The spouts also allow for high-speed tackles.[55] Despite being large and heavy, Blastoise can still move well on either two legs or all fours. Blastoise can be found living on island beaches near the ocean, but their preferred habitat seems to be freshwater ponds and lakes.

Caterpie[edit]

Number: 010 Type: Bug Evolves from: None Evolves into: Metapod

Caterpie (キャタピー Kyatapī?), known as the "worm" Pokémon,[56] was designed by Ken Sugimori.[57] Satoshi Tajiri, creator of the series, took heavy inspiration from his childhood hobby of insect collection in creating the various Pokémon species.[58] Caterpie was based on the design of a caterpillar, specifically the caterpillar of the Swallowtail butterfly.[59] Caterpie's name is derived from the word caterpillar as well.[60] Caterpie has green skin with a yellow underbelly, yellow spots, and large red osmeterium protruding from its forehead.[61] Their green bodies are useful for camouflage in foliage,[62] their eyes are patterned to scare away predators,[63] their suction-cup feet allow them to climb any surface,[64] and the osmeterium on their heads can project a horrid stench to repel predators.[65] Caterpie is the smallest of all the original Pokémon,[66] and grows in size by shedding its skin.[56] Caterpie evolves into Metapod, and eventually Butterfree.[67] It can only ever learn two attacks, Tackle and String Shot, and is severely limited in ability until it evolves.[61] Though, in all games following Pokémon Platinum, it became capable of also learning Snore and Bug Bite.

In the anime, Caterpie was the first wild Pokémon Ash caught. He caught it without a Pokémon battle, which Misty attributed to Caterpie's weakness. Caterpie was quite fond of Misty, but, much to Caterpie's misfortune, she wanted nothing to do with it because it was a Bug-type Pokémon, which she feared. The night after it was captured, Caterpie and Ash's Pikachu talked to each other, and Caterpie revealed its desire to evolve into a Butterfree. It fell asleep next to Misty who, in the morning, then hurt its feelings by reinstating her fear of bugs. Caterpie was the first Pokémon Ash sent out against the next Pokémon he tried to capture, Pidgeotto. With a large disadvantage against the Flying-type Pokémon, it was beaten severely. Despite this, when Team Rocket appeared to attempt to steal Pikachu, Ash sent out his weakened Caterpie against them, taking down both James's Koffing and Jessie's Ekans by itself using String Shot and Tackle, evolving into Metapod.[68] This Metapod eventually evolved into Butterfree, which left Ash to be with other Butterfree.

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Caterpie's first appearance is a cameo as some of the Pokémon that escape from Professor Oak's Laboratory. Yellow had a Caterpie named Kitty, which she did not want to evolve. However, in the battle against Lance, she did not have her Pokédex, which she needed to stop her Pokémon from evolving, and so Caterpie evolved into Metapod and then into Butterfree right afterwards.

Caterpie was featured on a postage stamp series in Great Britain.[69] Caterpie was part of a series of plastic toys released of the original Pokémon.[70] In the video games, Caterpie has received mixed reception; while it is often described as cute, it is also criticized as being useless. An IGN editor called "Pokémon of the Day Chick" expressed sympathy for Caterpie, in that most players catch the Pokémon early on in the game, but inevitably discard him in favor of other, more powerful characters.[61] Multiple other IGN editors acknowledged Caterpie's practical uselessness, one calling it "unbelievably pathetic."[60][61] IGN further likened the Pokémon to an "oversized tomato-horn-worm-lookin' thing" that deserved very little respect.[61] In another article, IGN called Caterpie "really cute," adding that the appropriate reaction to someone using Caterpie in battle is to "laugh out loud, then take it out with pretty much any Pokemon [sic] you can find."[71] The same reviewer expressed the belief that the game designers worked to ensure that Caterpie would "always suck beyond a shadow of a doubt" and called it the second worst Pokémon in the game.[72][73] IGN praised the Pokémon's name and that the -pie suffix makes it cute.[60] GamesRadar theorized that much of Caterpie's popularity stemmed from its central appearances in the Pokémon anime's first season. However, they themselves claimed to be tired of Caterpie, and the work it took to use it effectively.[74] The book Gaming Cultures and Place in Asia-Pacific cited it as an example of a common recurring and weak element in the games, whose presence rather than function was to emphasize the exclusivity and strength of other, rarer creatures for players to find.[75]

Metapod[edit]

Number: 011 Type: Bug Evolves from: Caterpie Evolves into: Butterfree

Metapod (トランセル Toranseru?), known as the Cocoon Pokémon, are pupal Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions, of which its larval form is the caterpillar-like Caterpie. They can evolve into the butterfly-like Butterfree. While Metapod is classified as a cocoon Pokémon, it bears more resemblance to a chrysalis. A Metapod's exterior is regularly hardened to protect its soft and tender innards while undergoing metamorphosis to eventually become a Butterfree.[76] To conserve energy for this event, the Metapod barely moves.[77] While this shell is said to be as hard as steel, a large sudden impact could cause its vulnerable body to pop out, leaving it completely exposed.[78]

Butterfree[edit]

Number: 012 Type: Bug/Flying Evolves from: Metapod Evolves into: None

Butterfree (バタフリー Batafurī?), known as the Butterfly Pokémon, are fully developed, butterfly-like Pokémon that have hatched from their pupal Metapod forms. Whereas many other Pokémon evolve into their final forms at much later levels, Butterfree's early availability makes it a temporarily strong asset to Pokémon Trainers starting out on their journeys. Butterfree resembles a vaguely anthropomorphic butterfly. Unlike true insects, it only has four legs, which are a pale blue color. It has a nose-like structure which is a similar color. Its body’s coloration is a darker purple-blue. It has large veined wings which are white with black markings. These markings can help distinguish male and female individuals. It has large compound eyes which tend to be a reddish color. Butterfree feed on honey from flowers, and they rub the honey onto the hairs on their legs to transport the honey back to their nests.[79] Like members of the order Lepidoptera, Butterfree’s wings are covered in fine scales that are water-repellant and allow it to fly in heavy rains,[80] something many other insect Pokémon such as Masquerain cannot do, and Butterfree wings are coated in toxic dust that can be shot at an opponent in battle through wing flapping.[81]

Weedle[edit]

Number: 013 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Kakuna

Weedle (ビードル Bīdoru?, Beedle), known as the Hairy Bug Pokémon, are larval Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions. They are very weak Pokémon that are captured to be evolved into their cocoon-like Kakuna form and eventually into the hornet-like Beedrill form. Weedle have little pink feet and a pink, round nose. Commonly spotted in the forests and grasslands, eating leaves, Weedle are well-protected from predators by sharp two-inch barbs on their heads[82] which secrete a strong poison, and another stinger is on each Weedle's rear. Sniffing with its big red proboscis, a Weedle uses its extremely acute sense of smell to find the types of leaves it eats.[83] Often living in forests and grasslands,[84] it eats its weight in leaves every day.[85]

Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, commented that Weedle's stinger made it appear more wild-like than Caterpie.[86] San Antonio Express News editor Susan Yerkes described Weedle as "disgustingly cute".[87] Destructoid's Jim Sterling included it in his list of 30 "rubbish" Pokémon in Pokémon Red and Blue. He called it a "centipede thing" and criticized it for its "shitty, lazy facial features" such as what he calls the "'whack a horn on it' mentality of Goldeen and Seel". He added that while Caterpie resembles a caterpillar, Weedle is a "joke".[88] IGN included Weedle as part of a poll of younger viewers on their favourite Pokémon.[89]

Kakuna[edit]

Number: 014 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: Weedle Evolves into: Beedrill

Kakuna (コクーン Kokūn?, Cocoon), known as the Cocoon Pokémon, are pupal Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions, of which its larval form is the worm-like Weedle. They can evolve into the hornet-like Beedrill. Kakuna is a yellow, cone-shaped cocoon Pokémon. Kakuna has a dome-shaped head and black, triangular eyes. Within the shell, a Kakuna busily prepares itself for evolution into its adult form, and the amount of energy released by this process makes the shell quite hot to the touch.[90] In the wild, Kakuna are often found near or on trees, and because their range of motion is extremely limited, they may be mistaken for dead. Carelessly approaching a Kakuna in this state would be extremely unwise because it can still extend the barb of its poisonous stinger to protect itself from threats.[91]

Beedrill[edit]

Number: 015 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: Kakuna Evolves into: None

Beedrill (スピアー Supiā?, Spear), known as the Poison Bee Pokémon, are fully developed, hornet-like Pokémon that have hatched from their pupal Kakuna forms. Although they are hornet-like, they only have four legs. The first two are tipped with long stingers. It has veined wings, and another stinger on its abdomen in which it holds its most powerful poison.[92] Beedrill are extremely territorial, and will be set off by anything that approaches a Beedrill nest.[93] When angered, Beedrill attack in a furious swarm, and the sharp ends of their stingers and the poison stored in their abdomens will definitely be put to use.[94]

In comparing Beedrill to Butterfree, Brett Elston argued that both were there to demonstrate evolution to new players, adding that Beedrill focuses more on dealing damage than Butterfree does. He notes that Beedrill, like Butterfree, will be replaced with more powerful Pokémon.[95] Boys' Life named Beedrill the third of five "coolest" Pokémon from Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen.[96]

Pidgey[edit]

Number: 016 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: None Evolves into: Pidgeotto

Pidgey (ポッポ?, Poppo), known as the Tiny Bird Pokémon, resembles a small, plump-bodied bird. It is a brown color, with a lighter colored throat and belly. The tips of its wings share this cream color. Both its feet and beak are a pinkish-gray color. Its plumage is fairly nondescript, particularly compared to its evolutions Pidgeotto and Pidgeot. It has black markings around its eyes and a small crest of brown and cream feathers above its eyes. Pidgey are docile and prefer to avoid conflict. If disturbed, however, it can ferociously strike back[97] and will use its wings to stir up clouds of sand in an attempt to distract its would-be opponent and escape.[19] Pidgey also uses this technique to bring its preferred prey of small insects into the open.[98] Pidgey seems to possess magnetoception, as it is capable of returning to its nest from any location without fail.[99]

Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, commented that while Pidgey's name was based on pigeon, it more closely resembled a sparrow.[100] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston attributed Pidgey's popularity to being commonly seen in the anime as well as being a solid Pokémon.[101] The Independent described Pidgey as a "cute-looking monster" and a "moderately angry pigeon."[102]

Pidgeotto[edit]

Number: 017 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: Pidgey Evolves into: Pidgeot

Pidgeotto (ピジョン Pijon?, Pigeon), known as the Bird Pokémon, is a larger and stronger form that Pidgey takes when it gains enough experience. It is a large raptor-like bird. While its primary color is brown, its plumage is much more elaborate than its pre-evolution, Pidgey. Its head-crest is much longer than Pidgey's and is a reddish color. The plumage of its tail is also quite colorful, alternating between red and yellow. Other than its ornamental plumage, its basic coloration is similar to Pidgey, with pinkish-gray feet and black markings around its eyes. Pidgeotto is extremely territorial, generally claiming a large area with its nest built in the center. Full of vitality, it constantly patrols its territory, mercilessly attacking intruders. They fly about in circular patterns while hunting, and can spot the movements of their prey on the ground no matter how high they fly.[103] Pidgeotto attacks with its wickedly sharp talons and carries its prey, including Exeggcute and Magikarp, back to its nest from as far as 60 miles away or more.[104] Pidgeotto appeared in the Pokémon anime as one of series star Ash Ketchum's first Pokémon. It eventually evolved into Pidgeot.

Pidgeot[edit]

Number: 018 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: Pidgeotto Evolves into: None

Pidgeot (ピジョット Pijotto?, Pigeot), known as the Bird Pokémon, is the fully grown and developed form of the Pidgey species evolution line. Pidgeot is noticeably larger than its pre-evolution. Its plumage tends to be larger and glossier. The feathers on its head-crest are nearly as long as its body, and are yellow and red. Its tail feathers are red colored. Like its previous evolutions, its underbelly is a tan color, and it has black markings around its eyes. With their powerful chest muscles at work, Pidgeot can flap their wings fast enough to whip up gusts of winds to rival tornadoes.[105] Pidgeot are very aerodynamic, capable of soaring to an altitude of 3300 feet[106] and reaching speeds of up to Mach 2.[107] Like Pidgeotto, Pidgeot feed on Magikarp by swooping from the sky and snatching them out of the water with their talons.[106] Pidgeot appear very similar to Pidgeotto, so much so that one has been easily mistaken for the other, even by official sources.[108] Pidgeotto evolves into Pidgeot in the anime, and eventually leaves him to protect its kind.

Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, described it as a predator of beetles, much like real birds.[100]

Rattata[edit]

Number: 019 Type: Normal Evolves from: None Evolves into: Raticate

Rattata (コラッタ?, Koratta) is known as the Mouse Pokémon. Rattata resemble small purple rats with large red eyes, cream bellies, paw soles and square fangs. Rattata has a long, slightly, purple curled tail. Rattata has large incisors and a long whisker on both sides that may be worn down by gnawing. Rattata have three-toed paws, which are the same color as its underbelly. They walk on four legs. Rattata has a large teeth which grow constantly to gnaw on hard things to wear them down. Rattata are among the earliest Pokémon that can be caught by players, so much so that it is said that the presence of one Rattata indicates the presence of more than forty Rattata in the area.[109] They make their nests almost anywhere[110] and as extreme omnivores eat anything they can scavenge.[111] A Rattata's fangs grow continuously throughout its lifespan, so it whittles them down to a comfortable size by gnawing on hard objects.[112] They are best known for their Quick Attack attack, which allows them to strike their enemy first, even if it is not their turn to do so.

Fellow GamesRadar editor Raymond Padilla criticized both Rattata and Raticate's design for being too similar to its inspiration and described it as a "filthy rodent".[113] Author Loredana Lipperini wrote that despite its knife-like fangs, Rattata shares the land peacefully with Pidgey.[114] Official Nintendo Magazine '​s Chris Scullion criticized how common Rattata was and described it as "rubbish".[115] IGN's "Pokémon Chick" wrote that anyone that has never seen a Rattata has never played a Pokémon game. She added that because of its underwhelming nature, it is usually sent to the players' PC box.[116] The Escapist '​s John Funk called it a "familiar face".[117]

Youngster Joey's ratatta is in the top percent of all ratatta

Raticate[edit]

Number: 020 Type: Normal Evolves from: Rattata Evolves into: None

Raticate (ラッタ?, Ratta), known as the Mouse Pokémon, is a larger and stronger form that Rattata takes when it gains enough experience. Raticate resemble large light brown rats with small black eyes, a yellow belly, a large cream-colored tail and the ability to stand on its hind legs. Raticate is mostly tawny in color with a cream-colored underside. In the main Pokémon game series, a Raticate is only acquired when a Rattata grows past experience level 20 and is evolved into a Raticate. Compared to a Rattata, a Raticate is far more of a predator, and the majority of its features are adapted for this purpose. Its whiskers give it balance and it slows down if they are cut off.[118] A female always has shorter whiskers. Its webbed feet allow it to swim as it hunts prey,[119] and its fangs are tough enough to topple concrete buildings by gnawing on them.[120]

On the S.S. Anne, Ash traded his Butterfree for a Raticate but traded back towards the end of the episode. Cassidy has a Raticate that for a time served in her and Butch's motto the role that Meowth serves in the motto of Jessie and James. In Showdown at Dark City, Raticate is one of the Pokémon belonging to one of the Trainers at Kas Gym. Mollie has a Raticate she used during the appeals round of the Gardenia Town contest in What I Did for Love. Butch of Team Rocket used a Raticate in The Ole' Berate and Switch. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, a Rattata was Yellow's first Pokémon. It later evolved into a Raticate.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston praised Raticate as a great Pokémon early in the game, but criticized it for losing its usefulness later in the game.[121] While she found it to be a Pokémon that has difficulties later in the game, IGN's "Pokémon of the Day Chick" called Raticate a "nasty surprise" for opponents.[116] She also called Raticate "one of the single most underrated Pokemon in existence".[116] 1UP.com's Michael Vreeland commented that Raticate's "Super Fang" technique was annoying for players when another trainer had it use it on their Pokémon.[122] IGN wrote that while it has the same problems as Rattata does, it has a high attack power.[123]

Spearow[edit]

Number: 021 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: None Evolves into: Fearow

Spearow (オニスズメ?, Onisuzume) are known as the Tiny Bird Pokémon. Their English names come from the words "spear" and "sparrow." When they are trained to Level 20, they can evolve into Fearow. Spearow are very small birds with rough plumage. They have the beak shape similar to that of raptors. Their pink feet each have three talons. They are noted for being frail, for which they make up for with their "Mirror Move" ability.[124] They eat insects in grassy areas by flushing them out with their stubby wings, and plucking at them with their beaks.[125] A Spearow's wings aren't good for long distance travel or high flying,[126] but one is able to fly at high speeds by flapping its wings very rapidly.[127] Spearow are very territorial, constantly buzzing about and calling with a loud cry that can be heard from half a mile away. This cry serves to scare away predators and to keep in touch with other Spearow, though the latter is reserved as an alarm to its kind.[128]

In the very first episode of the animated series (Pokémon, I Choose You!), series protagonist Ash Ketchum attempts to capture a Spearow right outside his hometown, Pallet Town, without his Pikachu's help; he only angers the Pokémon by hurling a pebble at it. Spearow calls out to its large flock, which pursue Ash and Pikachu. Pikachu eventually disperses the flock with massive Thunder, upon witnessing Ash's willingness to sacrifice his safety for Pikachu's.[129] Ash must deal with the flock once more when he returns to Pallet Town, and realizes the Fearow leading the flock had been the Spearow he tried to catch.[130] The flock reappeared in a flashback to that episode Ash had in Lucario and the Mystery of Mew. Professor Oak had a Spearow in the Pokémon Adventures manga. He used it against Green in their Pokémon League battle. It later evolved into Fearow.

Fearow[edit]

Number: 022 Type: Normal/Flying Evolves from: Spearow Evolves into: None

Fearow (オニドリル Onidoriru?, Onidrill), known as the Beak Pokémon, is a bird Pokémon that evolves from Spearow at level 20. Fearow is a large brown bird with a vulture-like neck. It has a large, long pointed beak and a red crown-like line of spikes upon its head. It also bears huge wings. All characteristics being a radical departure from its short-winged, stubby-beaked pre-evolved form Spearow. Fearow uses its great wings to catch air currents[131] and effortlessly glide over large distances for as long as a day without having to land or rest.[132] It flies high into the sky, and swoops down at its prey.[133] By using a combination of its neck and beak, it has a large reach, allowing it to pluck bugs from the ground or easily pluck prey from soil or water as it swoops down.[134] If it senses danger, it avoids it if possible.

In the animated series, the most notable Fearow is a leader of a flock of Spearow in Pallet Town, and attempts to drive away all the Pidgey in the area. Ash makes a stand against the Fearow, and realizes that it bears a grudge against him; it was the Spearow that Ash attempted to capture in the very first episode. Ash's Pidgeotto fights the Fearow, defeating it when it evolves into Pidgeot.[130] In the Electric Tale of Pikachu manga, Fearow is the first Pokémon Ash catches; similar to the first episode of the anime, Ash and Pikachu flee from angry Spearow, and when Ash protects Pikachu from harm, Pikachu dispatches the flock. Ash decides to take advantage of the situation, and catches the flock's leader, Fearow. Professor Oak had a Spearow in the Pokémon Adventures manga, which later evolved into Fearow.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston stated that while Fearow lacks the popularity of Pidgeot, it becomes more powerful more quickly.[135]

Ekans[edit]

Number: 023 Type: Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Arbok

Ekans (アーボ Ābo?, Arbo) is known as the Rattlesnake Pokémon. This reptilian Pokémon has a rattle at the tip of its tail, and is mostly purple while its underbelly, eyes, rattle, and the "bands" on it are yellow. They swallow whole the eggs of small bird Pokémon, such as Pidgey or Spearow.[136] Ekans are able to detach their jaws to swallow large prey whole, although this makes their bodies heavy.[137] Its highly poisonous fangs make it a hazard in the wild as they slither through the grass and unexpectedly strike.[138] Ekans also shares other characteristics as snakes, such as using its tongue to test the air for the presence of prey,[139] and shedding its skin.

UGO Networks featured Ekans and Arbok as part of its "Snake Week" and expressed joy that Pokémon had "at least one snake". They called Ekans a "killer Pokemon" and "a chalky purple snake with a penchant for being defeated". They added that "as reward for sucking so consistently, Ekans was allowed to evolve into 'Arbok,' bigger, badder and more purple than ever" and that Arbok "didn't fare much better than his lower form on the battlefield, but he sure looked cute whenever one of the more heroic Pokemon zapped the crap out of him".[140] Author Loredana Lipperini described Ekans as “treacherous.”[141]

Arbok[edit]

Number: 024 Type: Poison Evolves from: Ekans Evolves into: None

Arbok (アーボック Ābokku?), known as the Cobra Pokémon, are a larger and stronger form that Ekans take when they gain enough experience. In the main Pokémon game series, an Arbok is only acquired when an Ekans evolves. Arbok is a reptilian with purple scales over most of its body. It has lost the rattle it had on its tail as an Ekans. Like a cobra, it can spread out its ribs into a hood. On its "hood", it has a design much like an angry face. The frightening patterns on its hood have been studied and six variations have been confirmed.[142] Each design is native to a certain area.[143] It has a nasty bite with deadly venom. Terrifically strong, it is capable of crushing opponents by coiling its body around them and constricting. It can even flatten steel oil drums.[144] Rather vicious, Arbok are territorial. If it encounters an enemy, it raises its head, intimidating the opponent with the frightening pattern on its body, then they lash out at intruders with long fangs tipped with deadly venom.[145] With a vengeful nature, it won't give up a chase after prey or an opponent, no matter how far, once it targets it prey.[146]

IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that Arbok was a favorite among players who like Arbok for being an enemy toward Pikachu and Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon anime. She added that Arbok had "personality to spare and can add a splash of much-needed color and originality to any team." She also wrote that it is "one of the few pure Poison types that isn't a butt-ugly mass of undefined tissue" and referenced Muk and Weezing as examples.[147] She also called Arbok her "beloved".[148] She wrote that while she liked the Pokémon Seviper for being a snake, she will "always love Arbok just a little bit more simply because I was introduced and subsequently latched onto him first".[149] IGN's Pokémon of the Day Guy called it a "swell first Pokémon" and compared it to "Q-Bert '​s arch-nemesis".[150] UGO Networks featured Ekans and Arbok as part of its "Snake Week" and expressed joy that Pokémon had "at least one snake". They called Ekans a "killer Pokemon" and "a chalky purple snake with a penchant for being defeated". They added that "as reward for sucking so consistently, Ekans was allowed to evolve into 'Arbok,' bigger, badder and more purple than ever" and that Arbok "didn't fare much better than his lower form on the battlefield, but he sure looked cute whenever one of the more heroic Pokemon zapped the crap out of him".[140]

Pikachu[edit]

Number: 025 Type: Electric Evolves from: Pichu (Happiness) Evolves into: Raichu
Main article: Pikachu

Pikachu (ピカチュウ Pikachū?) are mouse-like creatures, and were the first "Electric-type" Pokémon created, their design intended to revolve around the concept of electricity.[151] They appear as mouse-like creatures that have short, yellow fur with brown markings covering their backs and parts of their lightning bolt shaped tails. They have black-tipped, pointed ears and red circles on their cheeks, which can spark with electricity.[152] In Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, gender differences were introduced; a female Pikachu now has an indent at the end of its tail, giving it a heart-shaped appearance. They attack primarily by projecting electricity from their bodies at their targets. Within the context of the franchise, a Pikachu can transform, or "evolve" into a Raichu when exposed to a "Thunderstone". In later titles an evolutionary predecessor was introduced named "Pichu", which evolves into a Pikachu after establishing a close friendship with its trainer.

Raichu[edit]

Number: 026 Type: Electric Evolves from: Pikachu Evolves into: None

Raichu (ライチュウ Raichū?), known as the Electric Mouse Pokémon, is a taller form that Pikachu takes when a Thunder Stone is applied. Raichu is a rather small bipedal rodent. It is able to run faster on all fours. Like Pikachu, Raichu has long ears and feet, and stubby arms; both species also have two horizontal brown stripes on its back. Its long, thin tail has a broad, lightning bolt-shaped end, which is smaller and blunted on females. Raichu is orange in color, with a white belly. Its paws are brown, as well as its toes, while the soles of its feet are tan colored. Its bifurcated ears are brown on the outsides and yellow on the insides, and end in a distinctive curl at their bottom-most point. Unlike Pikachu, with its distinctive red circles, the cheek sacs of Raichu are yellow. It has an aggressive nature if there's too much excess electricity, and can charge up to 100,000 volts.

In the anime, Lt. Surge, the Gym Leader of Vermilion City, has a Raichu that defeated Ash's Pikachu with its sheer power. After discussing evolution with Pikachu to match Raichu's power (Pikachu refused to evolve), Ash used a strategy relying on Pikachu's speed to defeat Raichu the next day.[153] Ever since that moment on, Raichu developed a newfound respect towards Pikachu. Raichu also appeared causing trouble for Pikachu and co. in Pikachu's Vacation, along with Marill, Snubbull, and Cubone.

Lt. Surge has a Raichu in Pokémon Adventures, which was first seen in Silph Co. but never participated in battles until fighting the Masked Man in his Mahogany Hideout, where it helped Surge break in and seemingly backed the mastermind into a corner, until his Houndour called upon dozens of wild Houndour to thwart Surge, instead.

Since it appeared in the Pokémon series, Raichu has received generally positive reception. It has appeared in several pieces of merchandise, including plush toys, figurines, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. It was also included as part of a Burger King Big Kids' Meal promotion.[154] The Chicago Sun-Times called Raichu an "old favorite."[155] Loredana Lipperini, author of the book Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, commented that Raichu was not as hugely popular as Pikachu.[156] Ryan Omega, author of the book Anime trivia quizbook: from easy to otaku obscure, episode 1, commented that Raichu "isn't that cute" and that this is why Ash did not want to evolve his Pikachu.[157] Pierre Bruno, author of La culture de l'enfance à l'heure de la mondialisation, compared the battle between Lt. Surge's Raichu and Ash's Pikachu to the Biblical story David and Goliath.[158] IGN editor "Pokémon of the Day Chick" noted that Raichu was "loved by many and despised by more," though she clarified that the hatred for Raichu was nowhere near the hatred for Pikachu. She went on to describe it as “stupid-looking.”[159] GamesRadar editor Brett Elston commented that because of the high level of emphasis on Pikachu, it's “easy to forget Raichu even exists.”[160]

Sandshrew[edit]

Number: 027 Type: Ground Evolves from: None Evolves into: Sandslash

Sandshrew (サンド Sando?, Sand), known as the Mouse Pokémon, are a species of brick-skinned mouse-like Pokémon found in several regions throughout the Pokémon world. Despite its name, Sandshrew's appearance borrows more from the armadillo or the pangolin than from the shrew; its primary means of defense when threatened is to instantly curl up its body into a ball, leaving only its tough skin exposed. When it is rolled up like this, Sandshrew has the potential to withstand many attacks, as well as being dropped from a great height (also similar to hedgehogs). Sandshrew's natural environment is buried in the sand in arid, sandy locations with very little moisture, such as a desert. It chooses this habitat to keep its hide as dry and tough as possible, while the sand also provides it with good camouflage.

In keeping with its physical characteristics, Sandshrew has high Defense in the video games, but low Speed. From Ruby and Sapphire onwards, it has the ability Sand Veil, which increases its evasion during a sandstorm. Sandshrew also appears in the spin-off game Pokémon Snap. In Pokémon Stadium, Sandshrew featured in its own mini game called "Dig! Dig! Dig!", in which players need to dig to the underground well before the others.

A Sandshrew owned by A.J. is featured in the eighth anime episode, "The Path to the Pokémon League." It had many notable traits, such as the ability to withstand water and its knowledge of Fissure, which it used to dispatch Team Rocket. A.J. and his Sandshrew appear as a cameo in Pokémon Yellow.

Sandslash[edit]

Number: 028 Type: Ground Evolves from: Sandshrew Evolves into: None

Sandslash (サンドパン Sandopan?, Sandpan), known as the Mouse Pokémon, are a larger and stronger form that Sandshrew take when they gain enough experience to reach level 22. Generally they are a moderately large, bipedal hedgehog or pangolin-like creature with hard yellow skin, lengthy claws, and a back loaded with an assemblage of large brown spikes. These spikes are hardened sections of Sandslash’s hide that grow to form a natural self-defense when Sandslash curls into a ball. Each spike remains on Sandslash for one year, after which it falls off and a new spike grows in its place. Sandslash can be found in desert areas, particularly close to dry forests. Sandslash's spikes serve a number of purposes to help cope with its environment, such as providing shade to protect it from the sun and heatstroke or using them offensively to harm both predators and prey. It uses its claws to climb trees, cut up food and dig, the latter being an activity that can cause them to break if done too quickly. It cannot run very quickly.

Nidoran♀[edit]

Number: 029 Type: Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Nidorina

Nidoran♀ (ニドラン♀ Nidoran Mesu?), known as the Poison Mouse Pokémon, are a species of poisonous mouse-like Pokémon found in the Kanto, Johto, Sinnoh and Kalos regions of the Pokémon world. Male Nidoran are classified as a separate species of Pokémon from the females due to differences in appearance between genders, such as the female being blue, instead of purple, and having smaller horns than the male. It should be noted that these were the first Pokémon to have known genders until the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver, although they remain as separate species to this date. This Pokémon protects itself with its venomous barbs. A female Nidoran birth is about 15 times more likely than a male one. However Nidoran♀ and Nidoran♂ cannot be bred together in the games, the same rule applies to their evolutions. They are fairly common in Kanto and Johto, but in Sinnoh the PokéRadar is required to find them, and in Kalos, they appear on route 11 (also called Miroir Way) during a Horde encounter.

Nidorina[edit]

Number: 030 Type: Poison Evolves from: Nidoran♀ Evolves into: Nidoqueen

Nidorina (ニドリーナ Nidorīna?), known as the Poison Pin Pokémon, is comparatively larger than its pre-evolution, though she loses the forehead horn, whiskers, and incisor teeth. Nidorina is turquoise in coloration, with a pale underside. Nidorina's poison spikes are larger, and retract when they are relaxed.[161] She has also gained the ability to stand on her hind legs. Nidorina is the female equivalent of Nidorino. This is shown even in her name, which ends in a as opposed to o in Nidorino. A is traditionally a feminine vowel in the English language, particularly at the ends of names.

Nidorina seems to be more docile and relaxed than her counterpart Nidorino.[162] She is a caring mother, chewing food for her young.[163] Although she would rather not attack at all, she prefers attacks like clawing and biting.[164] She seems to display close family bonds with others of her own kind, and becomes nervous when separated.[165] However, when angered, a Nidorina can become a formidable foe, able to emit ultrasonic cries to confuse opponents.[166] Nidorina live in expansive hot savannas and plains, sharing their home range with Nidorino. They are common in Kanto, but rare in Sinnoh.

Emily's Nidoran♀, nicknamed Maria evolved into Nidorina after battling Team Rocket and kissing Ralph's Nidoran♂, nicknamed Tony, in Wherefore Art Thou, Pokémon?. Gym Leader Whitney has a Nidorina, which was easily defeated by Ash's Cyndaquil in their Gym Battle. Green had a Nidoran♀ in Pokémon Adventures that evolved into a Nidorina. She later evolved into a Nidoqueen.

Nidoqueen[edit]

Number: 031 Type: Poison/Ground Evolves from: Nidorina Evolves into: None

Nidoqueen (ニドクイン Nidokuin?), known as the Drill Pokémon, are a fully grown and developed species of possum-like Pokémon. In the main Pokémon game series, a Nidoqueen can only be acquired when a Moon Stone item is applied to a Nidorina. Nidoqueen seem to be omnivores feeding on shrubs and fruit but they may snack on certain small Pokémon for protein. Also, Nidoqueen are much less aggressive than Nidoking and get along much better with others of their kind. Nidoqueen appears to be slightly weaker, but significantly more intelligent than Nidoking.

One of the most notable Nidoqueens in the Pokémon games is the one owned by Giovanni, the leader of Team Rocket in Pokémon Red and Blue, as well as its remakes, FireRed and LeafGreen. However, he did not use his Nidoqueen until he was battled at the Silph Co. building in Saffron City.

Nidoran♂[edit]

Number: 032 Type: Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Nidorino

Nidoran♂ (ニドラン♂ Nidoran Osu?), known as the Poison Pin Pokémon, are a species of poisonous rabbit-like Pokémon found in the Kanto, Johto, Sinnoh and Kalos regions of the Pokémon world. Unlike most Pokémon, female Nidoran are classified as a separate species from the males due to extreme differences in appearance between genders, such as the male having larger horns and completely different colors than the female. Male Nidoran are purple, and their horns secrete a powerful venom. The size of the horns determines the potency of the venom. Nidoran stiffens its large ears to sense danger. Male Nidoran are born far less frequently, and so the group will try to protect their future bull from harm. They are a fairly common sight in the Kanto and Johto regions, but in the Kalos region they only show up during a horde encounter.

Nidorino[edit]

Number: 033 Type: Poison Evolves from: Nidoran♂ Evolves into: Nidoking

Nidorino (ニドリーノ Nidorīno?), known as the Poison Pin Pokémon, are a larger and stronger form that Nidoran♂ take when they gain enough experience. Nidorino look somewhat like a rhinoceros and a rabbit with needles and horns covering its body. Nidorino is more aggressive than Nidoran♂ and is quick to attack when it notices a threat; its large ears are always on the lookout. The diamond-hard horn on its head secretes a powerful venom and on impact with an enemy, poison leaks out. If it senses a hostile presence, all the barbs on its back bristle up. Nidorino is the male counterpart of Nidorina.

In the main Pokémon game series, a Nidorino can be found as wild Pokémon in the Kanto and Johto regions of the Pokémon world, and it can also be acquired when a Nidoran♂ grows past experience level 16 and is evolved into a Nidorino. It is also notable for being one of the first two Pokémon seen in the anime and in the intro to the game Pokémon Red.

Nidoking[edit]

Number: 034 Type: Poison/Ground Evolves from: Nidorino Evolves into: None

Nidoking (ニドキング Nidokingu?), known as the Drill Pokémon, are a fully grown and developed species of male possum-like Pokémon and the final stage in the Nidoran♂ evolutionary line. Its horn is hard enough to pierce a diamond and contains secreted venom, making it a powerful stabbing tool upon prey and Pokémon battle opponents. Nidoking have immense upper-body strength, being able to snap a telephone pole like a dry twig. It uses its tail to smash down its target, then constrict it to break its bones. Its thick tail packs enormously destructive power capable of felling a metal transmission tower. Once a Nidoking goes on a rampage, nothing can be done to stop it. There are far fewer Nidoking than Nidoqueen in the anime. They serve as leaders of herds, with multiple Nidoqueen mates.

In the main Pokémon game series, a Nidoking can only be acquired when a Moon Stone item is applied to a Nidorino. They are the masculine equivalent to Nidoqueen. Nidoking are more primal, fighting other Nidoking for such matters as territory or food (or a Nidoqueen, during mating season). One of the most notable Nidokings in the Pokémon games is the one owned by Giovanni, the leader of Team Rocket in Pokémon Red and Blue, as well as its remakes, FireRed and LeafGreen. However, he did not use his Nidoking until he was battled as the Gym Leader of the Viridian City gym.

In a poll conducted by IGN, it was voted as the 42nd best Pokémon, where the staff commented on how Nidoking does not have a crown. They further stated that "Maybe in Generation VI he’ll finally get the adornments befitting a king".[167]

Clefairy[edit]

Number: 035 Type: Fairy Evolves from: Cleffa (Happiness) Evolves into: Clefable

Clefairy (ピッピ?, Pippi) is a small, bipedal Pokémon. Clefairy appears to be a pink creature, with stocky limbs and a round body which gives it a chubby appearance. It also possess large sensitive ears that have brown tips. It has small wings that seem incapable of flight, but allow it to bounce gracefully, and when store moonlight in their wings, allowing them to float in midair.[168] Clefairy was chosen as the main character of the Pokémon manga to make it more engaging for readers. However, Pikachu, who was chosen as the anime mascot, became the mascot for the whole series in order to appeal to younger female readers and their mothers. Clefairy evolves into Clefable by giving it a Moon Stone.[169] The Clefairy family were originally Normal types, but in Generation VI they lost the Normal type and became pure Fairy types instead. The same thing has occurred with the Snubbull family. However, the Clefairy family still has the large move pools associated with the Normal type. Clefairy appear in all entries of the mainline Pokémon titles. They also appear in spin-offs such as Pokémon Stadium and multiple entries in the Super Smash Bros. series.

Clefairy's first anime appearance was in Clefairy and the Moon Stone, in which Ash and his friends meet a group of Clefairy at Mt. Moon, where they pray to a moon stone.[170] It has appeared in subsequent episodes of the series. It also makes appearances in various Pokémon manga series. A timid, shy Clefairy is among the main characters of the Magical Pokémon Journey manga series.

IGN editor "Pokémon of the Day Chick" called Clefairy an "ever-popular Pokémon," though not as much as in the United States as it is in Japan. She added that she did an article for Clefairy solely because of her dislike for Clefable, though stating that it's "cool enough."[146] GamesRadar editor Carolyn Gudmundson compared Clefairy to Jigglypuff, stating that it is far less utilized, in spite of the fact that was initially supposed to be the mascot of the series. She also noted it as a part of an overused Pokémon design, the "huggable pink blob."[171]

Clefable[edit]

Number: 036 Type: Fairy Evolves from: Clefairy Evolves into: None

Clefable (ピクシー Pikushī?, Pixy), known as the Fairy Pokémon, is similar to Clefairy in appearance. It is larger than its pre-evolved form, with prominent ears and a pair of jagged wings on its back. Clefable inhabit remote mountainous areas and generally any environment that has sufficiently little ambient noise. Clefable’s hearing is extremely sensitive – it is said that it can discern the sound of a pin falling 1,100 yards (1,000 m) away, so it is averse to living in areas with sound pollution (compare with Whismur).

Clefable are also extremely timid, and rarely seen in the wild. They avoid all contact with outsiders. Even sensing the presence of others in the area (which is fairly easy thanks to their prodigious hearing) will cause it to run and hide immediately. They will, however, come into the open on quiet, moonlit nights to take a stroll on a lake.

Clefable’s wings are probably not fit for real flight, but they allow it to move in a skipping, bouncy manner as if it were walking on the moon's surface. They can even walk across the water’s surface this way, so when it takes the aforementioned stroll on the lake, it literally takes a stroll on the lake. Clefable’s wings, its hovering walk, its timidity and elusiveness have led them to be categorized as a type of fairy in the Pokémon world.

Vulpix[edit]

Number: 037 Type: Fire Evolves from: None Evolves into: Ninetales

Vulpix (ロコン?, Rokon), known as Fox Pokémon, is a fox-like creature with six curled tails, based on the Japanese fox spirit kitsune. From birth, Vulpix starts out with only one tail, which is white in color; this tail splits apart as it grows and turns red.[172][173] Most commonly female, Vulpix are especially known for having beautiful fur and tails.[174] Vulpix have a flame in their bodies, which when the temperature outside increases, they let out of their mouths to prevent their body temperature from getting too hot.[175] They can control this fire, and make them fly like will-o-wisps.[176] In the wild, Vulpix will feign injury to escape from more powerful predators.[177] Nintendo decided to give the various Pokémon species "clever and descriptive names" related to their appearance or features when translating the game for western audiences as a means to make the characters more relatable to American children.[58] It was originally going to be named Foxfire in the English versions until Nintendo of America settled with Vulpix, which is based on "vulpus", the Latin word for fox.[178]

During the first season of the Pokémon anime, Vulpix appears often as one of Brock's Pokémon. It is given to him by a girl named Suzy who feels she cannot take care of it as well as Brock could. Brock later meets up with Suzy in Johto and returns it to her. In Magical Pokémon Journey, Kiaraway, a Fire-type Pokémon Trainer, owns a female Vulpix. She is one of his most used Pokémon, first appearing with Cyndaquil. In Pokémon Adventures, Flannery owns a Vulpix that she used to battle Shelly's Ludicolo, but only succeeded in sealing its Nature Power attack before fainting. Years earlier, in the Yellow chapter, Bill also has a Vulpix, which is beaten easily by Green's Blastoise. In Pokémon Battle Frontier, the main character, Enta, has a powerful and loyal Vulpix.

IGN's Kristine, while playing Pokémon, was driven by her desire to own a Vulpix.[179] IGN described Vulpix as "one of the most adorable things you've ever seen", arguing that they felt the character was cuter than series icon Pikachu.[180] IGN's Pokémon Chick called Vulpix "second place" for her in a number of different categories in spite of her desire to raise a Vulpix.[181] Author Loredana Lipperini called it "totally kawaii", as well as "round and graceful".[182] GamesRadar's Brett Elston called it "undeniably cute" but inferior to Growlithe.[183] Authors Tracey West and Katherine Noll named Vulpix the fifth best Fire type Pokémon and wrote that Vulpix was "cute and cuddly" and "special".[184] Author Maria S. Barbo wrote that Vulpix had a "cute exterior" which "hides inner strength".[185]

Ninetales[edit]

Number: 038 Type: Fire Evolves from: Vulpix Evolves into: None
Main article: Ninetales

Ninetales (キュウコン Kyūkon?, Kyukon), also known as the Fox Pokémon, is a golden-white nine-tailed fox, based on the kitsune, a Japanese fox spirit.[186] The Kyūbi (九尾?), which held similar powers such as shapeshifting, were the main inspiration for the Pokémon. Ninetales' name was derived from the number of its tails, nine, and the fact that the idea for it came primarily from ancient Japanese tales.[186] This fox-like Pokémon is covered with a thick, luxurious golden-white fur, with a fluffy crest atop its head and a similar ruff around its neck. Ninetales have gleaming red eyes that are said to give them the power of mind control.[187] Its nine different tails hold strange, cosmic powers,[188][189] that let it live for 1,000 years,[190] Ninetales are highly intelligent Pokémon that understand human speech.[191] They are very vengeful and have been known to curse those who mistreat them for 1000 years.[192][193] Many legends surround this Pokémon, one of which stating that Ninetales was born when 9 saints were united and reincarnated as this Pokémon.[194]

Jigglypuff[edit]

Number: 039 Type: Normal/Fairy Evolves from: Igglybuff (Happiness) Evolves into: Wigglytuff
Main article: Jigglypuff

Jigglypuff (プリン?, Purin), known as the Balloon Pokémon, is shaped like a round ball, with pink skin, large blue or green eyes, catlike ears, and a tuft of fur on its forehead. Its skin is rubbery and stretchy. It can inflate its body like a balloon (usually when it becomes angry; this is accompanied by a distinctive "honk" sound), or flatten its body, much like fellow Nintendo character Kirby. An exact limit to the size it can grow to in this manner is unknown. Jigglypuff are characterized by putting their enemies to sleep by singing a lullaby.[195] Before beginning to sing, they mesmerize the opponent with their soft, glowing eyes, and if they inflate themselves, they can sing for longer periods of time.[195][196] They can easily adjust the wavelength of their voices to that of the brain waves of a sleeping being, allowing for their pleasing melody to put its audience to sleep.[197] They sing without pausing to take a breath, so if the opponent is resistant to sleeping, they potentially run out of air.[198] Game Freak's staff have noted Jigglypuff as both one of their and the public's favorite Pokémon, in terms of both anime and video game appearances.[199]

Wigglytuff[edit]

Number: 040 Type: Normal/Fairy Evolves from: Jigglypuff Evolves into: None

Wigglytuff (プクリン?, Pukurin), known as the singing rabbit Pokémon, is a relatively large pink balloon-like Pokémon with a white underbelly, large blue baby-like eyes, a pair of large rabbit ears, and a twisty tuft of pink hair on its forehead. It evolves from Jigglypuff through a Moon Stone. In fact, it's remarkably similar to its pre-evolved form, Jigglypuff, except the ears have grown larger and it now maintains an "oval" shape. Wigglytuff's eyes are always covered by a thin layer of tears, so that if any dust gets into Wigglytuff’s eyes, it is quickly cried away. In the games, Wigglytuff's fur is described to be "sublime", so much so that if two of them come into close contact with each other, they are difficult to separate.

In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Wigglytuff is the guild master of the guild that the lead character is a member of.

IGN's Pokémon of the Day Guy wrote that Wigglytuff was both "soft and cuddly".[200] IGN's Pokémon Chick called it a "perky pink Pokémon" and that while Jigglypuff's popularity was "mind-boggling", once it evolves into Wigglytuff, it "has a tendency to sort of slip into the background". She added that it was a "pity" because "this irritable, googly-eyed pastel mercenary is actually pretty cool".[201] Official Nintendo Magazine '​s Thomas East wrote that Wigglytuff's name was amusing and that it could have made his list of the five best Pokémon names.[202] Destructoid's Ashley Davis wrote that cute evolutions such as Wigglytuff do not become as useful as tougher looking ones.[203] Author Joseph Jay Tobin wrote that Wigglytuff was popular among young girls.[204] GamePro '​s Emily Balistrieri called the Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness incarnation of Wigglytuff a "weird, weird Pokémon".[205]

Zubat[edit]

Number: 041 Type: Poison/Flying Evolves from: None Evolves into: Golbat

Zubat (ズバット Zubatto?), known as the Bat Pokémon, is a small, blue bat-like Pokémon. It has two long, skinny legs. Zubat's face lacks any eyes and a nose. The insides of Zubat's ears and undersides of its wings are purple. Zubat's wings are supported by elongated 'fingers', and four teeth can be discerned from inside its mouth, two on the lower jaw and two on the upper. A female has smaller fangs. Zubat form colonies in dark places like caves, and use ultrasonic waves to identify and approach targets.[206] The waves act as a sonar to check for objects in its way.[207] During the day, it gathers with others and hangs from the ceilings of dark places.[208] It does so because prolonged exposure to the sun causes its body to become slightly burned.[209] While living in pitch-black caverns, their eyes gradually grew shut and deprived them of vision.[210]

Since their appearance in the Pokémon series, Zubat has received generally mixed reception. IGN's Pokémon Chick called the Zubat line her favourite dual-type Pokémon line.[211] IGN's Jack DeVries, Kristine Steimer, and Nick Nolan criticized the abundance of Zubats and Geodude, bemoaning the lack of variety in caves; they added that because of the simple design of Zubat it is easily replaceable.[212] Many sources have compared Zubat to Woobat, and consider it a replacement.[213][214][215][216][217][218]

Golbat[edit]

Number: 042 Type: Poison/Flying Evolves from: Zubat Evolves into: Crobat (Happiness)

Golbat (ゴルバット Gorubatto?), the evolved form of Zubat, is a fierce, nocturnal Pokémon. It resides in the darkness of caves, and is most active in the pitch black of night, especially if the moon is in its new phase.[219] It is widely known for sucking fresh blood from living things. Once it has found a living target, it attacks in a stealthy manner, often striking without warning from behind.[220] It harshly bites down on its prey with its four sharp fangs, strong enough to puncture the hide of any animal-like Pokémon, however strong the hide might be.[221] It then proceeds to drink ten ounces of blood instantly.[222] Golbat enjoys blood so much that it may not control its feeding. When weighed down with excess blood from overfeeding, it flies clumsily if at all.[222] Once it strikes, it will not stop draining energy from the victim even if it gets too heavy to fly.[223] Like Zubat, the female's fangs are smaller than the male's.

IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that Golbat was "unforgivably ugly" in Red and Blue but has fans.[211] She later used it as an example of an ugly middle evolution.[224] Newsday '​s Eric Holm called it a popular character in Pokémon.[225] Destructoid's Jim Sterling called Golbat "absolutely ridiculous" and that it "barely even qualifies as a bat". He added that he never liked Zubat or Golbat "either from an aesthetic or a gameplay point of view".[226]

Oddish[edit]

Number: 043 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Gloom

Oddish (ナゾノクサ?, Nazonokusa) is a weed-like Pokémon that looks like a small animated radish plant with a rounded body. Its body is blue or purple with two small feet and red eyes. On top of its head grows a large clump of 5 long green blades of grass. Oddish is a nocturnal Pokémon, using moonlight rather than the sun's rays for photosynthesis. During the day, Oddish avoids the sun's heat and brightness by burying itself into the earth, leaving only the leaves on top of its head visible above ground. In this way it disguises itself as a plant, misdirecting its herbivorous daytime predators. In the night, it goes around sowing its "seeds." While buried, Oddish nourishes itself by absorbing nutrients from the soil using its feet, which are said to temporarily change into a root-like structure for this purpose. Oddish has been known to use its leaves as hands, such as one who used this to climb a rope net and tried to fly like a Hoppip. If anyone pulls at Oddish's leaves and tries to uproot it while it is buried underground, Oddish will react by shrieking in a high-pitched voice. This mirrors the behavior of the legendary mandrake in a similar situation, although it seems that Oddish's squeaks do not have the same dire consequences as a mandrake's.

Gloom[edit]

Number: 044 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Oddish Evolves into: Vileplume/Bellossom (Sun Stone)

Gloom (クサイハナ?, Kusaihana) is a flower-like Pokémon that is a larger and stronger evolution of Oddish. Gloom can also be found in most grassy areas of most regions. The fluid that oozes from its mouth isn't drool; it is a nectar that is used to attract prey. Once the prey is attracted, the nectar will cling to the prey, trapping it. The nectar mostly attracts prey that lack a sense of smell, as the nectar smells so bad that those who have the misfortune of sniffing it suffer from memory loss. As well as its nectar, the pistil of Gloom's flower smells incredibly foul, often described as smelling of old sneakers, garbage, and rotten eggs with a hint of skunk fumes, and strong enough to be smelled from a mile away. It has been found that approximately 1 in 1,000 people enjoy the scent that Gloom emits. Those that don't enjoy the smell have been known to faint upon smelling it. When Gloom is faced with danger, the stench worsens. If it is feeling calm or secure, it does not release the horrible aroma. It is said to widely shower its attacks; with moves such as Stun Spore, Poison Powder, and Sleep Powder, it has the ability to cause status problems on its foes. Gloom has two evolved forms (from the second generation onwards), Vileplume and Bellossom. Unlike other Pokémon that evolve via level, Gloom will not evolve until it is exposed to an evolution stone; a Leaf Stone will make a Vileplume, while a Sun Stone produces a Bellossom.

Vileplume[edit]

Number: 045 Type: Grass/Poison Evolves from: Gloom Evolves into: None

Vileplume (ラフレシア Rafureshia?, Ruffresia) is a huge flower-like Pokémon that is a larger and stronger evolution of Gloom. Vileplumes can be obtained by using a Leaf Stone on a Gloom. Vileplume is known for its extremely offensive stench that comes from its large red flower. Vileplume uses this stench in battle, catching its foes off guard when they start to back away from the horrible smell. However, Vileplume's flower can actually be a hindrance in battle due to it being very heavy and bulky. Due to its weight, Vileplume walks very slowly, and it often must use its hands to help support the flower. Vileplume can be found in forests and they like to stay low to the ground. When they sleep, their huge petals droop over their head and they blend in more with the plants around them. They also release toxic, dense pollen into the air in this position so animals don't go near them. At night, they sometimes gather together to perform odd rituals – during this time they release toxic pollen to deter intruders. The white markings on this flower are larger in the female than in the male.

Since appearing in the Pokémon series, the Oddish evolutionary line has received generally positive reception. They have been featured in several forms of merchandise, including figures, plush toys, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. Vileplume was featured as a keychain in a Burger King promotion.[227] A first edition Vileplume card has been noted as being worth up to $75.[228] A Vileplume card was released with a printing mistake.[229]

Paras[edit]

Number: 046 Type: Bug/Grass Evolves from: None Evolves into: Parasect

Paras (パラス Parasu?) is a basic parasite-like Pokémon that has two mushrooms on its back. Paras can be found in some caves and the Safari Zone in Kanto and in Ilex Forest and the Bug Catching Contest in Johto.

Paras is born with tiny spores covering their body, which grow into tochukaso mushrooms as the Pokémon feeds. It is noted in that the relationship between the host and the mushrooms is a symbiotic relationship: the mushrooms will sap energy from the host, causing the Paras to continuously burrow underground in forest areas to gnaw on tree roots, since the tochukaso draws most of the energy from the roots. In return, the mushrooms defend the host by spraying toxic spores at enemies. The mushrooms themselves have strong healing properties, and are valued for their life extending properties.

Parasect[edit]

Number: 047 Type: Bug/Grass Evolves from: Paras Evolves into: None

Parasect (パラセクト Parasekuto?) is a larger and stronger evolution of Paras that has one large mushroom on its back instead of two (see Paras). The mushroom has completely taken over the bug host. Parasect resides in dark and damp places, a preference of the mushroom, not the bug. The mushroom also has numerous medicinal qualities. Parasect can be obtained when a Paras reaches level 24. Parasect can be found in the Cerulean Cave and Safari Zone in Kanto and Silver Cave in Crystal. The Japanese and English names are a portmanteau of the English words "parasite" and "insect". It is deeply related to the mushroom on its back. Parasect is the mushroom's host so in-place the mushroom gives it spores which paralyze its enemy on contact.

IGN listed Parasect as one of the best Bug types, alongside Scyther. While they praise its ability to use status-altering techniques, they bemoaned its lack of Bug attacks, aside from Leech Life.[230]


Venonat[edit]

Number: 048 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Venomoth

Venonat (コンパン Konpan?, Compoun), known as the Insect Pokémon, is a fairly common, dark purple, gnat-like Pokémon. Venonat has a round body covered in purple fur, which oozes poison.[231] It has a pair of clodhopper feet and stubby forepaws. Venonat has a pincer-like mouth, red compound eyes, and white antennae. Venonat has highly developed eyes, which act as a radar to help find suitable prey.[232] The small bugs it catches and eats appear only at night, so it sleeps in a hole in a tree until night falls.[233] Venonat’s prey and Venonat itself are both attracted by bright light.[233] Venonat live in dense forests with lots of undergrowth and little light. It is most common in Kanto and Johto with occasional sightings in Sinnoh.

Tracey Sketchit has a Venonat which he commonly uses to see things at night with. Koga and Aya of Fuchsia City both have a Venonat. Koga's instantly evolved into a Venomoth in The Ninja Poké-Showdown when it was sent out to battle Ash.

GameDaily ranked Venonat third on their list of the "Top 10 Weirdest Looking Pokémon", stating "Pokémon should be cuddly. Pokémon should have faces with big cheery smiles. They should not resemble bugs with blood-red eyeballs that suggest they carry disease."[234] GamesRadar however praised the character, stating while its appearance would imply worthlessness, to the point that around their offices "Venonat fan" was an insult, its attacks showed otherwise and made it a versatile character.[235] A theory exists that Butterfree and the Pokémon Venonat were once to be related; GamesRadar's Carolyn Gudmundson stated that their faces and hands were identical and looked more similar than Venonat does to its evolution Venomoth. She theorized that the developers may have mixed up the families due to Metapod being so similar to Venomoth. Another GamesRadar editor commented that Venomoth seemed diverged from Venonat.[236]

Venomoth[edit]

Number: 049 Type: Bug/Poison Evolves from: Venonat Evolves into: None

Venomoth (モルフォン Morufon?, Morphon) is a large, lavender, moth-like Pokémon. It is rare in the wild, but can also be obtained by raising the more common Venonat to level 31. Its wings are covered in extremely toxic, dust-like scales. These scales are color-coded to indicate the effect they will have upon coming into contact with a living creature, darker colours meaning poison, and lighter colours meaning paralysis. Venomoth is similar to Butterfree in that they both flap their wings to release toxic powders. However, Venomoth seems to be the more dangerous of the two, as it is described as scattering its toxins with every flap of its wings. Much like Venonat, Venomoth is nocturnal and feeds upon small insects. Also named All-Terrain Venomoth, the dragonslayer (lvl. 36), he managed to slay the dragon king Dragonite (lvl. 62) without taking any damage.

Diglett[edit]

Number: 050 Type: Ground Evolves from: None Evolves into: Dugtrio

Diglett (ディグダ Diguda?, Digda), known as the Mole Pokémon, is a small, brown mole, with what a large pink nose, with its body always halfway in the ground. Diglett live only a few feet underground, and feed on plant roots.[237] It burrows through the ground at a shallow depth, leaving raised earth in its wake,[238] perfect for planting crops.[239] Diglett are frequently kept on farms for this reason.[240] Diglett has very thin skin, and thus if Diglett is exposed to light its blood will heat up, causing it to grow weak.[241] Because of this, Diglett prefer dark places, sticking its head up only when the sun is not bright.[242][243] Otherwise, it pops up in caves.[243] Diglett make their homes in tunnels and caves under the earth, most of which are made by burrowing Onix.[244]

In Pokémon Stadium, Diglett featured in its own mini game called "Ekans Hoop Hurl", in which players must toss as many Ekans around as many Diglett as they can. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team and Red Rescue Team, the third story mission of the game is to rescue a Diglett from Mt. Steel. Afterwards, Diglett can be found near Pelipper Post Office. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Diglett is one of the members of Wigglytuff Guild. His primary role is sentry duty, to examine visitors' footprints and say what Pokémon they are.

In the anime, Diglett first appeared in Dig Those Diglett. They were causing trouble for a construction crew that planning on building a dam. The foreman insisted that the Diglett were to be exterminated, but the Pokémon of the trainers that happened to be in the area refused to fight them. The reason was that the Diglett and Dugtrio were helping to plant trees in the forest. Diglett were also used by a man named Poncho in The Underground Round-Up. He used them to dig tunnels underground of a town that was infested with Electrode. The tunnels sent the Electrode to an open field where they'd live in peace. Diglett were also featured in Plant It Now...Diglett Later!, helping villagers with crops and being the apparent target of some thieves. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Diglett makes a cameo in Raging Rhydon as wild Pokémon of Mt. Moon. Red also owns a Diglett that he uses against Eevee.

Considered one of the best Ground-type Pokémon in Red and Blue,[245] Diglett and Dugtrio's appearance has received criticism. IGN's Pokémon Chick criticized Diglett's and Dugtrio's designs, questioning how cute something with a "humongous gauche clown nose" and a lack of a body could be.[246] Destructoid's Jim Sterling called Diglett the "pinnacle of lazy goddamn design", further questioning how much effort went into the character's design during development of the game.[247]

Dugtrio[edit]

Number: 051 Type: Ground Evolves from: Diglett Evolves into: None

Dugtrio (ダグトリオ Dagutorio?), known as the Mole Pokémon, consists of three Diglett that merged into one body. They think exactly like each other, and work cooperatively.[248] They trigger earthquakes when they travel underground.[249] They burrow by bobbing their heads up and down separately.[250] They can dig over 60 miles in the hardest ground.[251]

In Pokémon Pinball, Dugtrio appears in a bonus stage that can be accessed by the Red Table. After the player has knocked out a number of Diglett, they must knock out the Dugtrio that appears to in. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team and Blue Rescue Team, Dugtrio sends the player to Mt. Steel to rescue his son. Dugtrio loves to show off to his son, but often forgets that people can't see him underground. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Dugtrio is one of the members of the Wigglytuff Guild. He updates the Outlaw Notice Board and Job Bulletin Board with rotating boards. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl a Dugtrio can be seen on the Ground Terrain of the Pokémon Stadium 2 stage, situated next to a large rock.

Dugtrio first appeared in Dig Those Diglett. They worked with Diglett to plant trees in a forest. In The Underground Round Up, Poncho used Diglett and Dugtrio to rid a town of Electrode. Poncho used his Dugtrio to get rid of Team Rocket's Electrode Eliminator. Katie used a Dugtrio against Ash during the Hoenn League in Shocks and Bonds. Katie's Dugtrio defeated Ash's Pikachu and was defeated by Ash's Glalie. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Giovanni owns a Dugtrio which was used to shatter the opening mechanisms on Red's Poké Balls, preventing him from releasing his Pokémon.

Considered one of the best Ground-type Pokémon in Red and Blue,[245] Diglett and Dugtrio's appearance has received criticism. IGN's Pokémon Chick criticized Diglett's and Dugtrio's designs, questioning how cute something with a "humongous gauche clown nose" and a lack of a body could be.[246]

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  63. ^ Pokédex: It has large, eye-like patterns on its head as protection. They are used to frighten off enemies. Game Freak (2000-03-06). "Pokémon Stadium". Nintendo 64. Nintendo. 
  64. ^ Pokédex: Its short feet are tipped with suction pads that enable it to tirelessly climb slopes and walls. Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  65. ^ Pokédex: For protection, it releases a horrible stench from the antenna on its head to drive away enemies. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  66. ^ Lipperini, Loredana (2000). Generazione Pókemon (in Italian). Castelvecch. p. 222. ISBN 88-8210-249-1. Retrieved 1 March 2010. 
  67. ^ Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Don L.F. Nilsen (October 2000). "Pokémon as Interactive Literature". Semiotic Review of Books (Thunder Bay: Lakehead University) 11 (2): 2. 
  68. ^ Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer) (September 10, 1998). "Ash Catches a Pokémon". Pokémon. Season Indigo League. Episode 3. Various.
  69. ^ Aaron, Robert (19 March 2001). "Series Honours Furry Friends". Toronto Star (Ontario: Torstar). pp. D06. 
  70. ^ "Pokemon War on Toys". The Daily Telegraph (Sydney: Telegraph Media Group). 5 August 2000. p. 005. 
  71. ^ Pokemon Strategy Guide - IGNguides
  72. ^ "Pokemon of the Day: Butterfree (#12)". IGN. News Corporation. 17 July 2003. Retrieved 1 March 2010. 
  73. ^ "Pokemon of the Day: Sunkern". IGN. News Corporation. 5 November 2003. Retrieved 1 March 2010. 
  74. ^ Elston, Brett (2010). "The Complete Pokemon RBY Pokedex, Part 1". GamesRadar. Future plc. p. 10. Retrieved 1 March 2010. 
  75. ^ Hjorth, Larissa; David Surman (2009). "9". Gaming Cultures and Place in Asia-Pacific (PDF). Taylor and Francis. ISBN 0-415-99627-9. Retrieved 2009-06-06. 
  76. ^ Pokédex: It prepares for evolution by hardening its shell as much as possible to protect its soft body. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  77. ^ Pokédex: Inside the shell, it is soft and weak as it prepares to evolve. It stays motionless in the shell. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  78. ^ Pokédex: Hardens its shell to protect itself. However, a large impact may cause it to pop out of its shell. Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  79. ^ Pokédex: It collects honey every day. It rubs honey onto the hairs on its legs to carry it back to its nest. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  80. ^ Pokédex: Water-repellent powder on its wings enables it to collect honey, even in the heaviest of rains. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  81. ^ Pokédex: In battle, it flaps its wings at high speeds to release highly toxic dust into the air. Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  82. ^ Pokédex: It attacks using a two-inch poison barb on its head. It can usually be found under the leaves it eats. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  83. ^ Pokédex: WEEDLE has an extremely acute sense of smell. It is capable of distinguishing its favorite kinds of leaves from those it dislikes just by sniffing with its big red proboscis (nose). Game Freak (2003-04-17). "Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  84. ^ Pokédex: Often found in forests and grasslands. It has a sharp, toxic barb of around two inches on top of its head. Game Freak (2004-09-09). "Pokémon Leaf Green". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  85. ^ Pokédex: It eats its weight in leaves every day. It fends off attackers with the needle on its head. Game Freak (2007-04-22). "Pokémon Diamond and Pearl". Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
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  88. ^ Thirty rubbish Pokemon: Red/Blue edition -Destructoid
  89. ^ "Pokémon of the Day - GBA News at IGN". Gameboy.ign.com. 2000-11-07. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  90. ^ Pokédex: It remains virtually immobile while it clings to a tree. However, on the inside, it busily prepares for evolution. This is evident from how hot its shell becomes. Game Freak (2005-05-01). "Pokémon Emerald". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  91. ^ Pokédex: Although it is a cocoon, it can move a little. It can extend its poison barb if it is attacked. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  92. ^ Pokédex: It has three poison barbs. The barb on its tail secretes the most powerful poison. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  93. ^ Pokédex: Beedrill is extremely territorial. No one should ever approach its nest — this is for their own safety. If angered, they will attack in a furious swarm. Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  94. ^ Pokédex: It can take down any opponent with its powerful poison stingers. It sometimes attacks in swarms. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  95. ^ Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 4. 
  96. ^ "The List: Coolest Pokémon from FireRed and LeafGreen". Boys' Life (Boy Scouts of America) 95 (2): 45. February 2005. ISSN 0006-8608. 
  97. ^ Pokédex: It is docile and prefers to avoid conflict. If disturbed, however, it can ferociously strike back. Game Freak (2007-04-22). "Pokémon Diamond and Pearl". Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  98. ^ Pokédex: It rapidly flaps its wings in the grass, stirring up a dust cloud that drives insect prey out into the open. Game Freak (2001-07-29). "Pokémon Crystal". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. 
  99. ^ Pokédex: Pidgey has an extremely sharp sense of direction. It is capable of unerringly returning home to its nest, however far it may be removed from its familiar surroundings. Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  100. ^ a b Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2000. ISBN 9788882102494. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  101. ^ Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 5. 
  102. ^ "This never happened with space hoppers - Life & Style". The Independent. 1999-11-21. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  103. ^ Pokédex: It has outstanding vision. However high it flies, it is able to distinguish the movements of its prey. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  104. ^ Pokédex: It immobilizes its prey using well-developed claws, then carries the prey more than 60 miles to its nest. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  105. ^ Pokédex: Its well-developed chest muscles make it strong enough to whip up a gusty windstorm with just a few flaps. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  106. ^ a b Pokédex: Its outstanding vision allows it to spot Magikarp, even while flying at 3300 feet. Game Freak (2001-07-29). "Pokémon Crystal". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. 
  107. ^ Pokédex: It spreads its beautiful wings wide to frighten its enemies. It can fly at Mach 2 speed. Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  108. ^ Michael Haigney and Kunihiko Yuyama (Directors) (1999). Pokémon: The First Movie (DVD). United States: Kids WB!. 
  109. ^ Pokédex: Will chew on anything with its fangs. If you see one, it is certain that 40 more live in the area. Game Freak (1999-10-01). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  110. ^ Pokédex: It eats anything. Wherever food is available, it will settle down and produce offspring continuously. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  111. ^ Pokédex: Bites anything when it attacks. Small and very quick, it is a common sight in many places. Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  112. ^ Pokédex: Its fangs are long and very sharp. They grow continuously, so it gnaws on hard things to whittle them down. Game Freak (2004-09-09). "Pokémon FireRed". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  113. ^ Raymond Padilla. "Pokemusings, week 18, Pokemon Battle Revolution Wii Features". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  114. ^ Loredana Lipperini (2000). Generazione Pokémon: i bambini e l ... - Google Books. Castelvecchi. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  115. ^ "ONM Blog: The Perfect Pokémon Game". Official Nintendo Magazine. 2010-05-04. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  116. ^ a b c Pokémon of the Day Chick (12/3/02). "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Rattata (#19) - IGN FAQs". IGN. Retrieved 2011-04-05.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  117. ^ "The Escapist : Review: Pokémon Black & White Versions". Escapistmagazine.com. 2011-03-04. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  118. ^ Pokédex: It uses its whiskers to maintain its balance. It apparently slows down if they are cut off. Game Freak (2004-09-09). "Pokémon LeafGreen". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  119. ^ Pokédex: Its hind feet are webbed. They act as flippers, so it can swim in rivers and hunt for prey. Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  120. ^ Pokédex: Gnaws on anything with its tough fangs. It can even topple concrete buildings by gnawing on them. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  121. ^ Brett Elston. "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond / Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. p. 9. 
  122. ^ "1UP's RPG Blog : Gotta Blog 'Em All #10: Come To Unova Again For the First Time!". 1up.com. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  123. ^ "Pokemon Strategy Guide - IGNguides". IGN. Archived from the original on 2002-02-04. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  124. ^ Pokédex: It busily flits around here and there. Even if it is frail, it can be a tough foe that uses Mirror Move. Game Freak (2004-09-09). "Pokémon FireRed". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  125. ^ Pokédex: It flaps its short wings to flush out insects from tall grass. It then plucks them with its stubby beak. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  126. ^ Pokédex: Its wings are short, so it can't fly a long distance. If it's not eating, it darts around in a hurry. Game Freak (2000-03-06). "Pokémon Stadium". Nintendo 64. Nintendo. 
  127. ^ Pokédex: Very protective of its territory, it flaps its short wings busily to dart around at high speed. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  128. ^ Pokédex: Its loud cry can be heard over half a mile away. If its high, keening cry is heard echoing all around, it is a sign that they are warning each other of danger. Game Freak (2005-05-01). "Pokémon Emerald". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  129. ^ Takeshi Shudō (writer) (September 8, 1998). "Pokémon - I Choose You!". Pokémon. Season Indigo League. Episode 01. Various.
  130. ^ a b Hideki Sonoda (writer) (1999-12-04). "Pallet Party Panic". Pokémon. Season 2. Episode 1. Various.
  131. ^ Pokédex: A Pokémon that enjoys flying. It uses its broad wings to adroitly catch the wind to soar elegantly into the sky. Game Freak (2000-03-06). "Pokémon Stadium". Nintendo 64. Nintendo. 
  132. ^ Pokédex: With its huge and magnificent wings, it can keep aloft without ever having to land for rest. Game Freak (2004-09-09). "Pokémon LeafGreen". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  133. ^ Pokédex: It shoots itself suddenly high into the sky, then plummets down in one fell swoop to strike its prey. Game Freak (2001-03-26). "Pokémon Stadium". Nintendo 64. Nintendo. 
  134. ^ Pokédex: Its long neck and elongated beak are ideal for catching prey in soil or water. It deftly moves this extended and skinny beak to pluck prey. Game Freak (2005-05-01). "Pokémon Emerald". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  135. ^ "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 2, Pokemon Diamond/Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2010-08-05. 
  136. ^ Pokédex: Moving silently and stealthily, it eats the eggs of birds, such as Pidgey and Spearow, whole. Game Freak (2004-09-09). "Pokémon LeafGreen". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  137. ^ Pokédex: It can freely detach its jaw to swallow large prey whole. It can become too heavy to move, however. Game Freak (2001-03-26). "Pokémon Stadium". Nintendo 64. Nintendo. 
  138. ^ Pokédex: It sneaks through grass without making a sound and strikes unsuspecting prey from behind. Game Freak (2007-04-22). "Pokémon Diamond". Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  139. ^ Pokédex: It flutters the tip of its tongue to seek out the scent of prey, then swallows the prey whole. Game Freak (2001-07-29). "Pokémon Crystal". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. 
  140. ^ a b "Movie Reviews, News, Spoilers, Stills and Trailers". UGO.com. Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
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  142. ^ Pokédex: The frightening patterns on its belly have been studied. Six variations have been confirmed. Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  143. ^ Pokédex: It is rumored that the ferocious warning markings on its belly differ from area to area. Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  144. ^ Pokédex: This Pokémon has a terrifically strong constricting power. It can even flatten steel oil drums. Once it wraps its body around its foe, escaping is impossible. Game Freak (2005-05-01). "Pokémon Emerald". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  145. ^ Pokédex: Transfixing prey with the face-like pattern on its belly, it binds and poisons the frightened victim. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  146. ^ a b Pokédex: With a very vengeful nature, it won't give up the chase, no matter how far, once it targets its prey. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  147. ^ "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Arbok (#24) – IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
  148. ^ "Pokemon Ruby Version Pokemon of the Day: Dunsparce – IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
  149. ^ "Pokemon Ruby Version Pokemon of the Day: Seviper (#336) – IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
  150. ^ Pokemon of the Day Guy. "Pokemon of the Day – GBA News at IGN". Gameboy.ign.com. Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
  151. ^ 『ポケットモンスター』スタッフインタビュー (in Japanese). Nintendo. Retrieved June 6, 2009. 
  152. ^ Pokédex: It lives in forests with others. It stores electricity in the pouches on its cheeks. Game Freak (2007-04-22). "Pokémon Diamond". Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  153. ^ Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer) (September 25, 1998). "Electric Shock Showdown". Pokémon. Season Indigo League. Episode 14. Various.
  154. ^ "Pok¿Monday - GBA Feature at IGN". Gameboy.ign.com. 1999-12-20. Retrieved 2010-09-25. 
  155. ^ Skertic, Annie (2000-04-23). "New Pokemon to hit TV". Chicago Sun-Times. 
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  158. ^ La culture de l'enfance ŕ l'heure de ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2002. ISBN 9782912404909. Retrieved 2010-09-25. 
  159. ^ "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Raichu (#26) - IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved 2010-09-25. 
  160. ^ "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 3, Pokemon Diamond/Pearl DS Features". GamesRadar. 2010-09-21. Retrieved 2010-09-25. 
  161. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. When resting deep in its burrow, its thorns always retract. This is proof that it is relaxed. 
  162. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. It has a calm and caring nature. Because its horn grows slowly it prefers not to fight. 
  163. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. When feeding its young, it first chews and tenderizes the food, then spits it out for the offspring. 
  164. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. The female's horn develops slowly. Prefers physical attacks such as clawing and biting. 
  165. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. When Nidorina are with their friends or family, they keep their barbs tucked away to prevent hurting each other. This Pokémon appears to become nervous if separated from the others. 
  166. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). "Pokémon FireRed". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. The female has a gentle temperament. It emits ultrasonic cries that have the power to befuddle foes. 
  167. ^ Audrey. "Nidoking - #42 Top Pokémon - IGN". IGN. Retrieved 2011-05-05. 
  168. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. The moonlight that it stores in the wings on its back apparently gives it the ability to float in midair. 
  169. ^ Tobin, Joseph (2004-02-05). Pikachu's global adventure: the rise ... - Google Books. ISBN 0822332876. Retrieved 2010-08-05. 
  170. ^ Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer) (September 15, 1998). "Clefairy and the Moon Stone". Pokémon. Season Indigo League. Episode 6. Various.
  171. ^ "The most overused Pokemon designs". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2010-08-05. 
  172. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. At the time of birth, it has just one tail. The tail splits from its tip as it grows older. 
  173. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. As it develops, its single white tail gains color and splits into six. It is quite warm and cuddly. 
  174. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. Both its fur and its tails are beautiful. As it grows, the tails split and form more tails. 
  175. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Sapphire". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. Inside Vulpix's body burns a flame that never goes out. During the daytime, when the temperatures rise, this Pokémon releases flames from its mouth to prevent its body from growing too hot. 
  176. ^ Game Freak (2005-05-01). "Pokémon Emerald". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. It can freely control fire, making fiery orbs fly like will-o'-the-wisps. Just before evolution, its six tails grow hot as if on fire. 
  177. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. If it is attacked by an enemy that is stronger than itself, it feigns injury to fool the enemy and escapes. 
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  187. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. Ninetales casts a sinister light from its bright red eyes to gain total control over its foe's mind. This Pokémon is said to live for a thousand years. 
  188. ^ Silvestri, Cris (2008). Pokémon Ultimate Handbook. New York City: Scholastic Corporation. p. 178. ISBN 0-545-07886-5. Retrieved 4 March 2010. 
  189. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. Some legends claim that each of its nine tails has its own unique type of special mystic power. 
  190. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. Its nine beautiful tails are filled with a wondrous energy that could keep it alive for 1,000 years. 
  191. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Sapphire". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. Legend has it that Ninetales came into being when nine wizards possessing sacred powers merged into one. This Pokémon is highly intelligent - it can understand human speech. 
  192. ^ Raabe, Nancy (10 November 1999). "The Poke List from 1 to 151, Here's Your Who's Who of All the Pocket Monsters". The Birmingham News 112 (Birmingham, Alabama: Advance Publications). pp. 8–G. 
  193. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. Very smart and very vengeful. Grabbing one of its many tails could result in a 1000-year curse. 
  194. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. According to an enduring legend, 9 noble saints were united and reincarnated as this Pokémon. 
  195. ^ a b Pokédex: If it inflates to SING a lullaby, it can perform longer and cause sure drowsiness in its audience. Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  196. ^ Pokédex: It captivates foes with its huge, round eyes, then lulls them to sleep by singing a soothing melody. Game Freak (2004-09-09). "Pokémon Firered". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  197. ^ Pokédex: Jigglypuff's vocal cords can freely adjust the wavelength of its voice. This Pokémon uses the ability to sing at precisely the right wavelength to make its foes most drowsy. Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  198. ^ Pokédex: When this Pokémon sings, it never pauses to breathe. If it is in a battle against an opponent that does not easily fall asleep, Jigglypuff cannot breathe, endangering its life. Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Sapphire". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  199. ^ "Pokémon interview" (in Japanese). Nintendo. Retrieved 2009-06-10. 
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  201. ^ "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Wigglytuff (#40) – IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved October 17, 2011. 
  202. ^ "ONM Blog: Best and worst Pokémon names". Official Nintendo Magazine. November 22, 2010. Retrieved October 17, 2011. 
  203. ^ "Nothing is Sacred: Cute characters suck". Destructoid. Retrieved October 17, 2011. 
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  205. ^ post a comment. "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time Review from". GamePro. Archived from the original on 2010-10-21. Retrieved October 17, 2011. 
  206. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. Forms colonies in perpetually dark places. Uses ultrasonic waves to identify and approach targets. 
  207. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. Emits ultrasonic cries while it flies. They act as a sonar used to check for objects in its way. 
  208. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). "Pokémon Crystal". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. During the day, it gathers with others and hangs from the ceilings of old buildings and caves. 
  209. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. Zubat remains quietly unmoving in a dark spot during the bright daylight hours. It does so because prolonged exposure to the sun causes its body to become slightly burned. 
  210. ^ Game Freak (2005-05-01). "Pokémon Emerald". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. While living in pitch-black caverns, their eyes gradually grew shut and deprived them of vision. They use ultrasonic waves to detect obstacles. 
  211. ^ a b Pokémon of the Day Chick (1/13/03). "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Golbat (#42) - IGN FAQs". IGN. Retrieved 2011-04-20.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  212. ^ Jack DeVries, Kristine Steimer, and Nick Kolan (2010-04-28). "What We Want: Pokemon Black & White - Nintendo DS Feature at IGN". IGN. Retrieved 2011-04-20. 
  213. ^ Edge Staff (2011-03-11). "Pokemon Black / White Review | Edge Magazine". Edge. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2011-04-20. 
  214. ^ Jack DeVries (2010-07-13). "Even More Pokemon Revealed - Nintendo DS News at IGN". IGN. Retrieved 2011-04-07. 
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  216. ^ Kat Bailey (2011-03-14). "Pokemon Black/White Review for DS from". 1UP.com. Retrieved 2011-04-07. 
  217. ^ Michael Vreeland (Oct 22, 2010). "1UP's RPG Blog : Gotta Blog 'Em All #5: Poktoberfest Continues!". 1UP.com. Retrieved 2011-04-07. 
  218. ^ Zivalich, Nikole (2011-03-25). "Pokemon Black Version for Nintendo DS - Preview - Pokemon Black and White". G4tv.com. Retrieved 2011-04-07. 
  219. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Sapphire". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. Golbat bites down on prey with its four fangs and drinks the victim's blood. It becomes active on inky dark moonless nights, flying around to attack people and Pokémon. 
  220. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. It attacks in a stealthy manner, without warning. Its sharp fangs are used to bite and suck blood. 
  221. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. However hard its victim's hide may be, it punctures with sharp fangs and gorges itself with blood. 
  222. ^ a b Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. It can drink more than 10 ounces of blood at once. If it has too much, it gets heavy and flies clumsily. 
  223. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. Once it strikes, it will not stop draining energy from the victim even if it gets too heavy to fly. 
  224. ^ Pokémon of the Day Chick (10/10/02). "Pokemon Crystal Version Pok�mon of the Day: Skiploom (#188) - IGN FAQs". IGN. Retrieved 2011-04-20.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
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  231. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. Poison oozes from all over its body. It catches and eats small bugs at night that are attracted by light. 
  232. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. Its large eyes act as radars. In a bright place, you can see that they are clusters of many tiny eyes. 
  233. ^ a b Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. Lives in the shadows of tall trees where it eats bugs. It is attracted by light at night. 
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  237. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. Lives about one yard underground where it feeds on plant roots. It sometimes appears aboveground. 
  238. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). "Pokémon FireRed". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. It burrows through the ground at a shallow depth. It leaves raised earth in its wake, making it easy to spot. 
  239. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. If a Diglett digs through a field, it leaves the soil perfectly tilled and ideal for planting crops. 
  240. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. Diglett are raised in most farms. The reason is simple - wherever this Pokémon burrows, the soil is left perfectly tilled for planting crops. This soil is made ideal for growing delicious vegetables. 
  241. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. Its skin is very thin. If it is exposed to light, its blood heats up, causing it to grow weak. 
  242. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). "Pokémon Crystal". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. It digs underground and chews on tree roots, sticking its head out only when the sun isn't bright. 
  243. ^ a b Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. It prefers dark places. It spends most of its time underground, though it may pop up in caves. 
  244. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). "Pokémon Yellow". Game Boy. Nintendo. Burrows at high speed in search of food. The tunnels it leaves are used as homes by Diglett. 
  245. ^ a b Pokemon Blue Guide & Walkthrough - Game Boy - IGN
  246. ^ a b Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Diglett (#50) - IGN FAQs
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  248. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). "Pokémon Ruby". Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. Dugtrio are actually triplets that emerged from one body. As a result, each triplet thinks exactly like the other two triplets. They work cooperatively to burrow endlessly. 
  249. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). "Pokémon Red and Blue". Game Boy. Nintendo. A team of Diglett triplets. It triggers huge earthquakes by burrowing 60 miles underground. 
  250. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Gold". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. Its three heads bob separately up and down to loosen the soil nearby, making it easier for it to burrow. 
  251. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). "Pokémon Silver". Game Boy Color. Nintendo. Extremely powerful, they can dig through even the hardest ground to a depth of over 60 miles.