Rauni-Leena Luukanen-Kilde

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Rauni-Leena Luukanen-Kilde
Rauni-Leena Luukanen-Kilde.jpg
Rauni-Leena Luukanen-Kilde in 2012.
Born (1939-11-15)15 November 1939
Värtsilä, Finland
Died 8 February 2015(2015-02-08) (aged 75)
Vaasa, Finland
Occupation Physician, author
Spouse(s) Mauri Luukanen (1965–?)
Sverre Kilde (1987–1996)

Rauni-Leena Tellervo Luukanen-Kilde née Valve[1] (15 November 1939 – 8 February 2015) was a Finnish physician who wrote and lectured on parapsychology, ufology and mind control.

Luukanen-Kilde was born in Värtsilä. She had to flee with her family in infancy during the Second World War and was raised in Helsinki.[2] She studied medicine at the universities of Oulu and Turku, graduating in 1967.[3] She was at one point the only medical practitioner at the hospital in Pelkosenniemi, performing dental and veterinary work as well.[4] In March 1975, she became a provincial medical officer in Rovaniemi, Lapland;[2] she became chief medical officer for Lapland.[4][5]

In 1982, as Rauni-Leena Luukanen, she published Kuolemaa ei ole (There Is No Death).[6] She had been interested in the paranormal since she was a teenager, but her interest in UFOs may date to a 1985 car accident which led to her retirement. She appeared as a featured speaker at UFO conferences, helped organize the first international conference on extraterrestrials in Finland[7] and authored books about UFOs, alien abductions, mind control and conspiracy theories. Luukanen-Kilde claimed to have been "rescued" from danger by extraterrestrials, and to have esoteric skills and knowledge as a result of her relationship with them.[8] She said that there was a secret exchange program between humans and aliens that was being deliberately suppressed by "powerful Western governments", particularly the United States.[2] Luukanen-Kilde also said that secret military and intelligence agencies were practising mind control technology on the world population using cell phones and supercomputers and that a plot to kill most of the Earth's population using the swine flu vaccine was being carried out by the WHO, Henry Kissinger and the Bilderberg Group.[9] Her article on cybernetic implants as a means of control is widely circulated.[3][10] She appears in the 1999 film Revelations: The End Times, Volume 2.

Luukanen-Kilde married a Norwegian diplomat in 1987[2] and moved to Norway in 1992.[11] He died in 1996. She died in Vaasa in February 2015 after a long illness, having returned to Finland shortly before.[3]

Selected publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Meretoja, Olli (ed.): Suomen lääkärit 2007, p. 665. Helsinki: Suomen Lääkäriliitto, 2008. ISBN 978-951-9433-56-1 (Finnish)
    Ultra, November 1999, p. 4.
  2. ^ a b c d Partridge, Christopher Hugh (2003). UFO religions. Psychology Press. ISBN 978-0-415-26324-5. 
  3. ^ a b c Mikko Juuti, "Ufologi Rauni-Leena Luukanen-Kilde on kuollut", Ilta-Sanomat, 9 February 2015 (Finnish)
  4. ^ a b Maria Tojkander, "Rauni-Leena Luukanen-Kilden salattu maailma", Mediuutiset 15 June 2007 (Finnish)
  5. ^ Tor Ole Ree, "Byr opp til borddans: Under Alternativmessa på Stiklestad i helga bys det opp til borddans", Innherreds Folkeblad Verdalingen 29 October 2009 (Norwegian): "Den pensjonerte legen har tidligere vært direktør i det finske helsedirektoratet." – "The retired physician was previously a director in the Finnish health service."
  6. ^ As automatic writing dictated by her deceased grandmother: "Automaattikirjoitusteksti saatu kirjoittajan isoäidiltä Aino Sofia Halmetojalta", note on the first edition.
  7. ^ Rob Irving, "A Double Whammy from Finland", Fortean Times 1997.
  8. ^ "Illalla televisiossa: Muistatko vielä ufologi Rauni-Leena Luukasen?", Ilta-Sanomat, 20 August 2013 (Finnish)
  9. ^ Carroll, Robert Todd (2003). The skeptic's dictionary: a collection of strange beliefs, amusing deceptions, and dangerous delusions. John Wiley and Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-27242-7. 
  10. ^ "Microchip Implants, Mind Control, and Cybernetics", Spekula 1999.
  11. ^ Grete Ingebjørg Berge, "Full bris i seila", Telemarksavisa 6 June 2008, updated 7 June 2008 (Norwegian)

External links[edit]