Ray Genet

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Leszek Cichy, who did the first winter ascent of Mount Everest in February 1980, found a note there urging the passers-by to call a certain prostitute in Anchorage for "a good time". Apparently Genet left it there as a prank after reaching the summit.[1]

Ray Genet (July 27, 1931 – October 2, 1979), often referred to by the nickname Pirate, was a Swiss-born American mountain climber. An accomplished mountaineer, his many distinctions included having been the first guide on North America's highest mountain, Alaska's Mount McKinley.

Genet's association with McKinley began in 1967, when, despite having no previous mountaineering experience, he participated in the first successful winter expedition to McKinley's summit, led by Gregg Blomberg. The expedition is described in Minus 148 Degrees: The First Winter Ascent of Mount McKinley by Art Davidson.[2]

Genet died on October 2, 1979 while descending Mount Everest, succumbing to hypothermia in the night along with his fellow climber Hannelore Schmatz.

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