Ray Shell

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Ray Shell
Born USA
Nationality American
Occupation Actor, Author, Producer

Ray Shell is an African-American film, TV and stage actor, as well as an author, director and producer. He is famous for creating the roles of Nomax in Five Guys Named Moe and Rusty in Starlight Express. He is a Creative Director of the Giant Olive Theatre Company, resident Company at the Lion & Unicorn Theatre in Kentish Town.

Career[edit]

In 2008, Shell wrote about his appearance in and the closure of the musical Gone with the Wind for The Guardian newspaper.[1] After arriving in London in 1978 with the Gospel musical Little Willie Jr's Resurrection, Shell immediately became part of London's New Wave music scene recording with Howard Devoto's Magazine, covering Kate Bush's "Them Heavy People". He went on to record with his own band The Street Angels featuring a "pre-Simon Cowell Sinita, Carl McKintosh and Charita Jones.

Summer 2011, Shell was the performance coach for Adrian Grant's Respect La Diva starring Sheila Ferguson, Zoe Birkett, Katy Satterfield, Denise Pearson and Andy Abraham. In winter 2011, Ray was James Earl Jones' standby in the London West End production of the Broadway hit Driving Miss Daisy starring, Boyd Gaines and Vanessa Redgrave in the title role.

In March 2012, Shell's TAIP (Total Artist in Production) produced The Gaddafi Club, a new play. In spring 2012, Ray toured the UK as MC Romeo Marcell in Dancing in the Streets. In 2012, Shell directed A Dream Across the Ocean, a new British musical produced by Samuel Facey and Dave Prince from ChurchBoyz Entertainment.[2] Also in 2012, Arcadia Books published Spike Lee: The Eternal Maverick, a biography by Shell.[3] Towards the end of 2012, Shell will start production on the film version of Iced and will publish Twenty Two, a new novel. He also appears as Bill Devaney in the newly created West End musical The Bodyguard, based on the movie of the same name.[4]

Credits[edit]

References[edit]

  • "Momma Cherri". The Sunday Times. August 21, 2005. Retrieved 2008-07-26. 

External links[edit]