Reader (Inns of Court)

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A Reader in one of the Inns of Court in London was originally a senior barrister of the Inn who was elected to deliver a lecture or series of lectures on a particular legal topic.[1][2] Two Readers (known as Lent and Autumn Readers) would be elected annually to serve a one-year term.

Lincoln's Inn became formally organised as a place of legal education thanks to a decree in 1464, which required a Reader to give lectures to the law students there.[3]

By 1569 at Gray's Inn there had been Readers for more than a century, and before the rise of the Benchers they formed the governing body of the Inn.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Inner Temple Admissions Database: Glossary". The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple. Retrieved 2010-07-10. 
  2. ^ a b Simpson, A.W.B. (1975). "The Early Constitution of Gray's Inn". Cambridge Law Journal (Cambridge University Press) 34 (1): 138–139. ISSN 0008-1973. 
  3. ^ Ringrose, Hyacinthe (1909). The Inns of Court An Historical Description. Oxford: R.L. Williams. p. 81. OCLC 60732875.