Reading, Ohio

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Reading, Ohio
City
Motto: "The Crossroads of Opportunity"
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Coordinates: 39°13′22″N 84°26′21″W / 39.22278°N 84.43917°W / 39.22278; -84.43917Coordinates: 39°13′22″N 84°26′21″W / 39.22278°N 84.43917°W / 39.22278; -84.43917
Country United States
State Ohio
County Hamilton
Area[1]
 • Total 2.89 sq mi (7.49 km2)
 • Land 2.89 sq mi (7.49 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2] 561 ft (171 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 10,385
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 10,348
 • Density 3,593.4/sq mi (1,387.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 45215, 45236, 45237
Area code(s) 513
FIPS code 39-65732[5]
GNIS feature ID 1056486[2]
Website www.readingohio.org

Reading /ˈrɛdɪŋ/ is a city in Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. The population was 10,385 at the 2010 census.[6] It is a suburb of Cincinnati.

History[edit]

In 1794, a German immigrant by the name of Abraham Voorhees moved his family from their home near Philadelphia, building a large double log cabin along the west bank of the Millcreek in Sycamore Township. Shortly after, a visitor from Reading, PA (Harvey Redinbo) was pleased with the land that Voorhees had acquired and purchased his own land, in the area of Hunt Road and Columbia Avenue. This early settlement (1797) was known as Voorhees-Town, but was changed to Reading in the honor of Redinbo’s hometown, and the birthplace of his father-in-law (William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania – born in Reading, England).

Reading was incorporated as a village in 1851.[7]

Geography[edit]

Reading is located at 39°13′22″N 84°26′21″W / 39.22278°N 84.43917°W / 39.22278; -84.43917 (39.222709, -84.439036).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.89 square miles (7.49 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,230
1870 1,575 28.0%
1880 2,680 70.2%
1900 3,076
1910 3,985 29.6%
1920 4,540 13.9%
1930 5,723 26.1%
1940 6,079 6.2%
1950 7,836 28.9%
1960 12,832 63.8%
1970 14,617 13.9%
1980 12,843 −12.1%
1990 12,038 −6.3%
2000 11,292 −6.2%
2010 10,385 −8.0%
Est. 2012 10,348 −0.4%
Sources:[9][10][5][11]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 10,385 people, 4,554 households, and 2,624 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,593.4 inhabitants per square mile (1,387.4 /km2). There were 4,962 housing units at an average density of 1,717.0 per square mile (662.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.1% White, 7.3% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.7% of the population.

There were 4,554 households of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.4% were non-families. 36.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.97.

The median age in the city was 39.5 years. 21.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.2% were from 25 to 44; 27.5% were from 45 to 64; and 14.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.1% male and 50.9% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 11,292 people, 4,885 households, and 2,921 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,867.6 people per square mile (1,493.1/km²). There were 5,128 housing units at an average density of 1,756.4 per square mile (678.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.69% White, 3.20% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.18% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.51% from other races, and 1.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.79% of the population.

There were 4,885 households out of which 27.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.2% were non-families. 34.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,140, and the median income for a family was $51,858. Males had a median income of $35,466 versus $26,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,527. About 4.7% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 10.2% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Reading's public school system includes two neighborhood schools, Central Elementary and Hilltop Elementary, which both serve Pre-K through fifth grade. Reading Middle School is co-located with Central Elementary and houses grades 6-8. Reading High School serves grades 9-12 and is the home of the 2003 division III state boys basketball champions.

Reading includes a Roman Catholic all-girl's high school, Mount Notre Dame High School, where the daughter of Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman was one of the first students. Two Catholic elementary schools, Sts. Peter and Paul Academy and St. Nicholas Academy, serve students in grades 1-8.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Reading city, Ohio". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved October 31, 2012. 
  7. ^ Nelson, S. B. (1894). "History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Ohio: Their Past and Present, Including...biographies and Portraits of Pioneers and Representative Citizens, etc., Volume 1". p. 449. Retrieved 11 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 


External links[edit]