Readington Township, New Jersey

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Readington Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Readington
Map of Readington Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Readington Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Readington Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Readington Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°34′54″N 74°46′40″W / 40.581601°N 74.777851°W / 40.581601; -74.777851Coordinates: 40°34′54″N 74°46′40″W / 40.581601°N 74.777851°W / 40.581601; -74.777851[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Royal Charter July 15, 1730
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Betty Ann Fort (term ended December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Vita Mekovetz[4][5]
Area[1]
 • Total 48.039 sq mi (124.421 km2)
 • Land 47.736 sq mi (123.636 km2)
 • Water 0.303 sq mi (0.784 km2)  0.63%
Area rank 34th of 566 in state
1st of 26 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 213 ft (65 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 16,126
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 16,090
 • Rank 157th of 566 in state
2nd of 26 in county[12]
 • Density 337.8/sq mi (130.4/km2)
 • Density rank 468th of 566 in state
15th of 26 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08870 - Readington[13]
08888 - Whitehouse[14]
08889 - Whitehouse Station[15]
Area code(s) 908[16]
FIPS code 3401962250[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882178[1][19]
Website www.readingtontwp.org

Readington Township is a township located in the easternmost portion of Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 16,126,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 323 (+2.0%) from the 15,803 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,403 (+17.9%) from the 13,400 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] Nationwide, Readington Township ranked 87th in 2000 among the Highest-income places in the United States with a population of at least 10,000.[citation needed]

Whitehouse Station (2010 Census population of 2,089[21]) is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community located within Readington Township.[22]

Created by Royal charter of King George II, "Reading" Township was formed on July 15, 1730, from portions of Amwell Township. It was the first new township created after Hunterdon became a county. The township was incorporated as Readingtown Township, one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships, on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were annexed by Tewksbury Township in 1832 and 1861.[23]

Covering more than 48 square miles (120 km2), it is the largest township in the county, covering almost 11% of the county's area.[24] Over 8,000 acres (32 km2) of land have been preserved. Readington Township is bounded on the north by the Lamington River and Rockaway Creek; to the east by Somerset County, which existed as the boundary between East and West Jersey from 1688–1695;[25] to the south, the South Branch of the Raritan River; and to the west by the old West Jersey Society's line which crosses the Cushetunk Mountains.

Geography[edit]

Readington Reformed Church in Readington Village

Readington Township is located at 40°34′54″N 74°46′40″W / 40.581601°N 74.777851°W / 40.581601; -74.777851 (40.581601,-74.777851). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 48.039 square miles (124.421 km2), of which, 47.736 square miles (123.636 km2) of it was land and 0.303 square miles (0.784 km2) of it (0.63%) of it was water.[1][2]

The township borders Clinton Township, Raritan Township and Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon County; and Branchburg and Hillsborough Township in Somerset County.[26]

Cushetunk Mountain is a ring-shaped mountain located in Clinton Township. Once an active volcano, the diabase mountain was formed 160 million years ago. The Lenape called the mountain "Cushetunk" meaning "place of hogs".[27] In the 1960s, the valley was filled with water to create Round Valley Reservoir, at 180 feet (55 m) in depth the second-deepest in the state.[28]

Communities[edit]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names within the township include Backers Island, Higginsville, McCrea Mills, Riverside, Rockfellows Mills, Round Mountain, Stovers Mills and Wood Church, as well as the following:[29]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,717
1820 1,964 14.4%
1830 2,102 7.0%
1840 2,373 12.9%
1850 2,836 19.5%
1860 3,076 8.5%
1870 3,070 −0.2%
1880 3,103 1.1%
1890 2,813 −9.3%
1900 2,670 −5.1%
1910 2,569 −3.8%
1920 2,525 −1.7%
1930 2,811 11.3%
1940 2,905 3.3%
1950 4,080 40.4%
1960 6,147 50.7%
1970 7,688 25.1%
1980 10,855 41.2%
1990 13,400 23.4%
2000 15,803 17.9%
2010 16,126 2.0%
Est. 2013 16,090 [11][30] −0.2%
Population sources:
1810-1920[31] 1840[32] 1850-1870[33]
1850[34] 1870[35] 1880-1890[36]
1890-1910[37] 1910-1930[38]
1930-1990[39] 2000[40][41] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 16,126 people, 5,971 households, and 4,496 families residing in the township. The population density was 337.8 per square mile (130.4/km2). There were 6,191 housing units at an average density of 129.7 per square mile (50.1/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.09% (15,011) White, 1.33% (214) Black or African American, 0.11% (18) Native American, 3.60% (581) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.77% (124) from other races, and 1.10% (177) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.93% (633) of the population.[8]

There were 5,971 households, of which 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.0% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.15.[8]

In the township, 25.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 20.4% from 25 to 44, 35.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.4 years. For every 100 females there were 96.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $120,821 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,180) and the median family income was $138,171 (+/- $10,232). Males had a median income of $100,647 (+/- $11,576) versus $61,372 (+/- $6,196) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $55,493 (+/- $4,019). About 1.3% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.[42]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 15,803 people, 5,676 households, and 4,410 families residing in the township. The population density was 331.4 people per square mile (127.9/km²). There were 5,794 housing units at an average density of 121.5 per square mile (46.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 95.14% White, 0.76% African American, 0.06% Native American, 2.56% Asian, 0.53% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.05% of the population.[40][41]

There were 5,676 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.3% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.3% were non-families. 18.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.18.[40][41]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 30.6% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 9.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.7 males.[40][41]

The median income for a household in the township was $95,356, and the median income for a family was $106,343. Males had a median income of $66,778 versus $48,385 for females. The per capita income for the township was $41,000. About 0.7% of families and 1.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.[40][41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Readington Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor. The Mayor serves as chair of the Township Committee and has the powers vested in the mayor's office by general law.[43]

As of 2015, members of the Readington Township Committee are Mayor Betty Ann Fort (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2016; term as mayor ends 2015), Deputy Mayor Thomas S. Auriemma (R, term on committee and as deputy member ends 2015), John D. Broten (R, 2017), M. Elizabeth "Liz" Duffy (R, 2015; serving an unexpired term) and Samuel D. Tropello (R, 2017).[44][45]

In the 2014 general election, Republicans Sam Tropello and John Broten prevailed against a write-in campaign waged by incumbents Julia Allen and Frank Gatti, who had lost the Republican primary in June.[46] The factions on the all-Republican council split on the leadership roles at the 2015 reorganization meeting, choosing Betty Ann Fort as mayor and Tom Auriemma as deputy mayor.[47]

In December 2014, the Township Council selected Elizabeth Duffy from a list of three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the vacant seat of Beatrice Muir, who had resigned the previous month from a term of office ending in December 2015.[48]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Readington Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[49] and is part of New Jersey's 16th state legislative district.[9][50][51] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Readington Township had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[52]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[53] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[54] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[55][56]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 16th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher Bateman (R, Somerville) and in the General Assembly by Jack Ciattarelli (R, Hillsborough Township) and Donna Simon (R, Readington Township). [57][58] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[59] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[60]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[61] As of 2015, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director John King (R; Raritan Township, 2015),[62] Freeholder Deputy Director Suzanne Lagay (R; Holland Township, 2016),[63] J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2015),[64] John E. Lanza (R; Flemington, 2016)[65] and Robert G. Walton (R; Hampton, 2017).[66][67] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[68] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2016)[69] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2018).[70][71][72]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 11,223 registered voters in Readington Township, of which 1,745 (15.5%) were registered as Democrats, 5,118 (45.6%) were registered as Republicans and 4,354 (38.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 6 voters registered to other parties.[73]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 63.8% of the vote (5,537 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 35.0% (3,039 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (103 votes), among the 8,730 ballots cast by the township's 11,700 registered voters (51 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 74.6%.[74][75] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 61.1% of the vote (5,646 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 37.0% (3,425 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (100 votes), among the 9,245 ballots cast by the township's 11,302 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.8%.[76] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 63.5% of the vote (5,566 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 35.7% (3,127 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (91 votes), among the 8,767 ballots cast by the township's 10,679 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 82.1.[77]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 79.1% of the vote (4,524 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 19.5% (1,114 votes), and other candidates with 1.5% (83 votes), among the 5,812 ballots cast by the township's 11,669 registered voters (91 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 49.8%.[78][79] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.4% of the vote (4,771 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 20.6% (1,395 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.3% (495 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (46 votes), among the 6,777 ballots cast by the township's 11,169 registered voters, yielding a 60.7% turnout.[80]

Education[edit]

The Readington Township Public Schools serve students in Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011–12 school year, the district's four schools had an enrollment of 1,951 students and 180.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.83:1.[81] Schools in the district (with 2011–12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[82]) are Three Bridges School[83] (PreK-3; 37 students), Whitehouse School[84] (K-3; 372), Holland Brook School[85] (4-5; 463) and Readington Middle School[86] (6-8; 743).[87]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend the Hunterdon Central High School, part of the Hunterdon Central Regional High School District, which serves students in central Hunterdon County. Students from Delaware Township, East Amwell Township, Flemington Borough, Raritan Township and Readington Township attend Hunterdon Central High School.[88][89]

Business and industry[edit]

Readington Township is home to the global headquarters of Merck & Co., one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the country.[90] It is also home to the personal and commercial lines of insurance of Chubb Corp.,[91] and the Quick Chek Corporation, which operates over 100 convenience stores throughout New Jersey and New York.[92]

Readington's business climate benefits from its proximity to major highways, Princeton, Bridgewater Township and other centers of business in central New Jersey.

Emergency services[edit]

Readington Township is served by a full-time Police Department, two ambulances staffed by the Whitehouse Rescue Squad, and four volunteer Fire Companies.

EMS and rescue services[edit]

  • The Whitehouse First Aid & Rescue Squad Station 22 Rescue was formed in 1950 and provides the lead EMS & Rescue coordination for the Township under the leadership of Chief Jeff Herzog. They are a blended department, with over 50 EMTs. The squad has a rescue services division led by volunteers for rescue operations such as automobile extrication, confined space and water rescue. 22 Rescue has two stations, one at the Three Bridges Fire Department, and one in Whitehouse Station. [93]

Fire departments[edit]

The following volunteer fire departments serve the Township:[94]

  • East Whitehouse Volunteer Fire Co., organized in December 1923 (Station 31 Fire)[95]
  • Readington Volunteer Fire Co., established in 1958 (Station 32 Fire)[96]
  • Three Bridges Volunteer Fire Co., established in 1927 (Station 33 Fire)[97]
  • Whitehouse Station Volunteer Fire Co. #1 (Station 22 Fire)[98]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 178.01 miles (286.48 km) of roadways, of which 145.39 miles (233.98 km) were maintained by the municipality, 19.33 miles (31.11 km) by Hunterdon County and 13.29 miles (21.39 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[99]

Interstate 78, U.S. Route 202, Route 22 and Route 31 all pass through the township.

Public transportation[edit]

White House Station

The township is also served by New Jersey Transit's White House station,[100] offering service on the Raritan Valley Line to Newark Penn Station and Hoboken Terminal, with connecting service to Penn Station New York in Midtown Manhattan.[101]

NJ Transit provides local bus service on the 884 route.[102]

Community[edit]

The Quick Chek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2012.[103] The event held at Solberg-Hunterdon Airport is the largest summertime hot air balloon festival in North America.[104]

FBI shootout[edit]

On April 5, 2007, a shootout near a PNC Bank branch on U.S. Route 22 in Readington resulted in the death of an FBI agent. FBI Agent Barry Lee Bush, assigned to the Newark FBI Office, was investigating a string of bank robberies in Central New Jersey, was airlifted to a New Brunswick hospital where he was pronounced dead. All three suspects were caught.[105]

Museums[edit]

Readington is home to several museums and offers many programs for adults and children. The Bouman-Stickney Homestead is located off of Dreahook Road in the hamlet of Stanton. Coldbrook School, the site of living history programs for the township's elementary school children is in the northern section of town, and the Eversole-Hall House is located on Route 523, next to the Municipal building.[106] Taylor's Mill was built around 1760 by John Taylor. The township plans to make Taylor's Mill a fourth township museum because it is the only remaining pre-revolutionary mill in the town and of its role of providing troops with food during the Revolutionary War.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Readington Township include:

References[edit]

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  3. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed March 12, 2015. As of date accessed, Julia Allen was listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2014.
  4. ^ Administration, Township of Readington. Accessed July 14, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk, Township of Readington. Accessed July 14, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 103.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Readington, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
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  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Readington, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 14, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Whitehouse, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 14, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Whitehouse Station, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 14, 2012.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Readington, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 23, 2014.
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  25. ^ Where Was the West Jersey/East Jersey Line?, WestJersey.org
  26. ^ Areas touching Readington Township, MapIt. Accessed January 4, 2015.
  27. ^ Cushetunk Mountain Preserve, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Division of Parks and Recreation. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  28. ^ "Round Valley Recreation Area Offers Something for Everyone", New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Accessed November 14, 2012.
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  41. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Readington township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 14, 2012.
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  44. ^ Readington Township Committee, Readington Township. Accessed March 12, 2015.
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  46. ^ Kiriluk-Hill, Renée. "Tropello and Broten beat Allen and Gatti in Readington Township", Hunterdon County Democrat, November 5, 2014 Accessed January 4, 2015. "Sam Tropello and John Broten won election to the Township Committee on Nov. 4, following an '"intensive count' of 5,024 write-in ballots on Nov. 5 at the county clerk's office. After the write-in votes were reviewed and apportioned, Broten led the pack, with 2,885 votes, followed by Tropello, with 2,793, Mayor Julia Allen with 2,386 and Committeeman Frank Gatti, 2,372."
  47. ^ Kiriluk-Hill, Renée. "Betty Ann Fort new Readington mayor in split vote at reorganization", Hunterdon County Democrat, January 6, 2015. Accessed March 12, 2015. "Betty Ann Fort was elected mayor in a split vote by her fellow Township Committee members on Jan. 5. Tom Auriemma will serve as deputy mayor.... The Township Committee remains all-Republican, but Tropella and Broten in the June primary had defeated incumbents Julia Allen and Frank Gatti, and then prevailed again in November after the incumbents launched a write-in campaign."
  48. ^ Staff. "Duffy appointed to Readington Twp. Committee to complete Muir's term", Hunterdon County Democrat, December 16, 2014. Accessed March 12, 2015. "Liz Duffy has been appointed to a seat on the Readington Township Committee.She will be completing the term of Beatrice Muir, who announced her retirement in November."
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  55. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  63. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  64. ^ J. Matthew Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  65. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  66. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  67. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  68. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
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