Rebecca Frayn

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Rebecca Frayn
Born (1962-05-06) 6 May 1962 (age 52)
Occupation filmmaker
screen writer
novelist
Years active 1979–present
Spouse(s) Andy Harries (1992–present)
Children Finn Harries, Jack Harries, Emmy Lou Harries.

Rebecca Frayn (born 6 May 1962) is an English documentary film maker, screenwriter and novelist.

Career[edit]

Rebecca Frayn is a film maker, screen writer and novelist, inspired by contemporary issues. She has directed a wide variety of quirky documentary essays for the BBC, Channel 4 and ITV on subjects that range from Tory Wives to the Friern Barnet Mental Asylum and identical twins.[1]

She made her drama debut as a director with Whose Baby? for ITV,[2] a TV drama that tackled father's rights, starring Sophie Okonedo and Andrew Lincoln. And a screenplay she wrote for the BBC, Killing Me Softly explored the true story of Sara Thornton, whose conviction for murder helped bring about a reform of the law on domestic violence. Over the years, she has also written and/or directed a number of films about prominent women of our times, including Leni Riefenstahl, Annie Leibovitz and Nora Ephron. And Her screenplay about Aung San Suu Kyi, The Lady,[3] directed by Luc Besson and starring Michelle Yeoh and David Thewlis was awarded the Amnesty International Human Rights Film Award in 2011.

Her first novel, One Life, dealt with the complex emotional and ethical landscape of IVF. Her second novel, Deceptions, is a psychological thriller, inspired by a true story and explores the impact on a family when a child goes missing.

After making a short viral film in 2008 opposing the proposed expansion of London Heathrow Airport,[4] she co-founded We CAN, a group who lobbied the government to take action on climate change in the run up to the 2010 Copenhagen Conference.[5] In 2012 she directed the Green Party's political broadcast.[6]

She is currently writing a screenplay for the BFI, Miss Behaviour that charts the Miss World demonstrations in 1970 and the birth of feminism. A third novel is apparently in the pipe line.

Personal life[edit]

Rebecca Frayn graduated from the University of Bristol in 1984. She married film producer Andy Harries in July 1992 and they have three children: twin sons, Jack Harries and Finn Harries, and a daughter Emmy. Frayn had to undergo IVF to have her daughter, an experience which inspired her novel One Life.[7] Frayn's father is English playwright and novelist Michael Frayn.[8]

Credits[edit]

As novelist[edit]

Year Name Publisher
2006 One Life Simon and Schuster
2010 Deceptions Simon and Schuster

As drama director[edit]

Year Film Broadcaster
2003 Single – Episodes 1 to 3 of 6 Tiger Aspect for ITV1
2004 Whose Baby? Granada ITV1

As documentary director[edit]

Year Film Broadcaster
1991 The Ghosts of Oxford Street Channel 4 / Middlemarch Films
1993 Annie Leibovitz – South Bank Show ITV / Middlemarch Films
1995 Talk Radio – Naked News Channel 4 / Oxford TV
1995 Nora Ephron – South Bank Show LWT / Middlemarch Films
1995 Tory Wives – Modern Times BBC 2 / Middlemarch Films
1997 Identical Twins – Cutting Edge Channel 4 / Middlemarch Films
1998 Bare – Modern Times BBC 2 / Middlemarch Films
1999 Asylum – Cutting Edge Channel 4 / Compulsive Viewing
2000 Space X3 episodes BBC 2 / Middlemarch Films
2003 The World According To ParrImagine BBC One

As documentary producer[edit]

Year Film Broadcaster
1993 The Wonderful Horrible World of Leni Riefenstahl – Without Walls Special Channel 4 / Middlemarch and Omega Films
1999 Upstarts x 3 episodes Channel 4 / Middlemarch Films

As screen writer[edit]

Year Film Broadcaster Director
1991 The Last Laugh He Play/She Play Channel 4/ Middlemarch Films Betsan Morris Evans
1991 The Ghosts of Oxford Street Channel 4 / Middlemarch Films Rebecca Frayn and Malcolm McLaren
1996 Killing Me Softly – Screen on One BBC Two/Middlemarch Films Stephen Wittaker
2011 The Lady Europacorp and Left Bank Pictures Luc Besson

As actress[edit]

Year Film Role Director
1979 One Fine Day June Stephen Frears

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rebecca Frayn – Profile". The Guardian (London). 12 January 2009. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "Rebecca Frayn – Film maker, screenwriter and novelist". Intelligence Squared. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Rebecca Frayn (11 December 2011). "The untold story of Burma's Aung San Suu Kyi". The Telegraph (London). 
  4. ^ Topham, Laurence; Frayn, Rebecca (13 January 2009). "Heathrow picnic and protest". The Guardian (London). 
  5. ^ Rebecca Frayn (12 January 2009). "How I became an eco-warrior". The Guardian (London). 
  6. ^ GreenPartyEW (5 April 2012). "Vote Green Party: Make The Difference on May 3rd". Youtube.com. 
  7. ^ Rebecca Frayn (30 August 2009). "Rebecca Frayn: I just wanted a baby.". The Independent (London). 
  8. ^ Nigel Jones (8 February 2007). "January: Birth of a Novel". Mail Online (London). 

External links[edit]