Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir

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Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir
Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir.jpg
Born (1978-05-25) May 25, 1978 (age 36)
Iceland Iceland
Known for Photography
Website
rebekkagudleifs.com

Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir (born May 25, 1978) is a photographer from Iceland who was named the "Web's Top Photographer" by the Wall Street Journal on July 29, 2006.[1]

Biography[edit]

She lived in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., from age 4 to age 11. She currently lives in Hafnarfjörður, near Reykjavík, Iceland. Her Flickr images led to her creating and appearing in a Toyota advertising campaign.[1][2]

Her posted images at Flickr were copyrighted, but then sold by a third party without her consent.[3] "Only Dreemin" sold 60 prints, of seven of her photos, for more than £2,500. She protested by putting up a photo at Flickr that named "Only Dreemin" and had text telling of the illegal sale, but Flickr removed it saying users cannot "harass, abuse, impersonate, or intimidate others". [4] [5] [6]

Since then, the thread was put back online by Flickr and Guðleifsdóttir received an official apology.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jurgensen, John (2006-07-29). "Moguls of New Media.". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2007-05-20. "Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir, Web's Top Photographer. Last year, Ms. Guodleifsdottir, an art student from Iceland, was just learning how to use her camera. Now, she's rated the most popular photographer on Flickr, an online community where 4 million users post and peruse photos. Her following began when this self-portrait with an apple in mid-air appeared on the site s feature page. This past week, she was hired to shoot -- and appear in -- advertisements for Toyota, which discovered her work on Flickr. (note: the full list is no longer up at the WSJ website)" 
  2. ^ Smith, David (2006-08-13). "Images of icy beauty come out of cold". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 2007-05-20. "Three o'clock one Icelandic morning, Rebekka Guoleifsdottir couldn't sleep. There was a picture in her mind's eye, and only one way to realise it. So she picked up her camera, drove out of her home town and stood in a lake for an hour, water lapping at her knees. She took picture after picture after picture until she got the right shot." 
  3. ^ Cohen, Noam. "Use My Photo? Not Without Permission.". New York Times. Retrieved 2007-09-25. "There are many accusations of people misusing Flickr photographs, including the case of an Icelandic woman who says an online gallery based in Britain sold her work without her approval, and a German photographer who says a right-wing Norwegian political party used a photo of her sister in its materials also without permission." 
  4. ^ "Flickr censorship or moderation mess-up?". Adorama. Retrieved 2007-02-14. "When popular Flickr member Rebekka Guðleifsdóttira's photos (her Flickr homepage shown) and comments were deleted, immediate charges of censorship were leveled against Flickr. Other Flickr members (as well as competitor Zooomr CEO Thomas Hawke) rallied to her defense by the hundreds. Flickr didn't respond -- at least initially -- leading many to charge that as a part of Yahoo had "gone corporate" and was making bad decisions." 
  5. ^ "Icelandic photographer: Stolen photos sold on eBay". Iceland Review. Retrieved 2007-02-14. "Photographer Rebekka Gudleifsdóttir, who is a member of the online community flickr.com, claims the British company Only-Dreemin has stolen photographs from her flickr page and sold them as prints on canvas on eBay. "I found eight of my photographs on the website [eBay] under some name which obviously wasn’t right," Gudleifsdóttir told Fréttabladid. She found out that her photos had been sold for about ISK 300,000 (USD 4,700, EUR 3,500)." 
  6. ^ "Yahoo 'censored' Flickr comments". BBC. 2007-05-18. Retrieved 2007-05-20. "Yahoo has been accused of censorship on its popular photo website Flickr, in a row that has highlighted the issue of copyright in the online age. Late last year photographer Rebekka Gudleifsdóttir discovered that eight of her pictures were reportedly being sold by a UK-based online gallery." 

External links[edit]