Rebel Without a Crew

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Book cover

Rebel Without a Crew (subtitle: Or How a 23-Year-Old Filmmaker with $7,000 Became a Hollywood Player) is a 1995 non-fiction book by Robert Rodriguez. Presented in a diary format, Rebel details Rodriguez's beginnings as a young filmmaker, his stint at a medical testing facility to raise money for a feature film, the making of that film (El Mariachi) for $7,000, and his subsequent experiences in Hollywood selling the film and going to film festivals promoting it.[1]

Later editions of the book also feature one of Rodriguez's tutorials on low-budget filmmaking ("Ten Minute Film School") and the screenplay to El Mariachi.[2]

Influence[edit]

Rodriguez' rags-to-riches story, detailed in Rebel, as well as his vociferous support of low-budget techniques (such as digital cinematography) to allow anyone to make a movie cheaply, have made him an icon of modern independent filmmaking.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Rodriguez (1995). Rebel Without a Crew. New York: Dutton Books, Plume. pp. 6–11. OCLC 155845528. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  2. ^ Robert Rodriguez (1996). "Contents: Appendix 1 & Appendix 2". Rebel Without a Crew. New York: Plume. pp. 197–287. OCLC 155845528. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  3. ^ Office of Communications, LOC (December 28, 2011). "2011 National Film Registry More Than a Box of Chocolates". News Release. Library of Congress. Retrieved June 14, 2012. "[Rodriguez has become], in Berg’s estimation, 'arguably the most successful Latino director ever to work in Hollywood.'"