Rebound (video game)

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Rebound
Developer(s) Atari Inc.
Distributor(s) Atari Inc.
Platform(s) Arcade
Release date(s) North America February, 1974
Genre(s) sport
Cabinet unique
CPU discrete
Sound Amplified Mono (one channel)
Display Horizontal orientation, raster (black and white), Standard Resolution.

Rebound is a 2 player arcade game by Atari Inc., originally released in February 1974. The game simulates a volleyball match, having players volley a ball back and forth over a net with their paddles. Rebound is also the first game that was cloned and released under the then hidden Atari subsidiary Kee Games, as Spike.[1]

Technology[edit]

The original working name of Rebound was Volleyball. The game is housed in a custom cabinet that includes two paddles and a lit start button. The cabinet bezel is made of an orange tinted plastic, providing an orance colored overlay to the entire screen. The game PCB is composed of discrete technology. Steve Jobs signed off on the Jan 9, 1974 dated cabinet wiring diagram provided with the units.[2]

Rebound is also available as an upgrade to Pong. As Pong starts immediately when a coin is dropped, the Rebound PCB also immediately starts game play without the presence of start button wiring.[2]

Gameplay[edit]

Each player controls a horizontally displayed bat with their respective paddles. They then begin volleying a ball back and forth across a graphical representation of a net. When you hit the ball with your bat, it 'bounces' off at one of 5 different angles depending on the segment of the bat hit: two "forward" angles, straight up, and two angles "behind" you - away from the net. Each player can only hit the ball three times during a volley, the fourth bounce goes right through the paddle and your opponent scores.[2] The size of the net also grows as volleys increase.[3]

Spike[edit]

Spike is a clone of Rebound released under Kee Games, at that time a newly created subsidiary portrayed publicly as a competitor to allow Atari to get more of the arcade market.[1] Besides a different cabinet design, the key distinction between the two was the addition of a "spike" button. According to Steve Bristow, the designer, "If you timed it right you could do a real killer spike.".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fulton, Steve (2007-11-06). "The History of Atari: 1971-1977; 1974: More Of The Same". Gamasutra. Retrieved 2008-01-04. 
  2. ^ a b c Welburn, Andy. "Andy's Arcade Bronzeage Info Resource: Atari rebound resource page". Andys-Arcade. Retrieved 2008-01-04. 
  3. ^ "Rebound (1974) at KLOV". Retrieved 2008-01-04. 
  4. ^ Vendel, Curt. "ATARI Coin-Op/Arcade Systems 1970 - 1974". Atari Museum. Retrieved 2008-01-04.