Recovery from Cults

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Recovery From Cults
Recovery from cults book cover AFF.jpg
Book Cover
Editor Michael Langone
Authors Susan Andersen, David Clark, Richard L. Dowhower, Gary Eisenberg, Geri-Ann Galanti, Kevin Garvery, Lorna Goldberg, William Goldberg, Carol Giambalvo, Noel Giambalvo, Susan J. Kelley, Janja Lalich, Madeleine Landau Tobias, Michael Langone, Paul R. Maring, Arnold Markowits, Herbert L. Rosedale, Patrick L. Ryan, Margaret Singer, Mark Trahan, Rob Tucker, Philip Zimbardo
Cover artist Justine Burkat Trubey, book design
Country United States
Language English
Subject cults
Genre non-fiction
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Publication date
June 1995
Pages 432
ISBN 0-393-31321-2
OCLC 32776672

Recovery from Cults: Help for Victims of Psychological and Spiritual Abuse a 1995 book edited by Michael Langone, director of the International Cultic Studies Association (formerly the American Family Foundation), published by W. W. Norton & Company, treats the theories of mind control as related to cults.

The book has 22 contributors including Ph.D.’s, therapists, and pastors. Designed as a reference for people seeking help past New Religious Movements/Cults/Sects experiences.[1]

Reviews[edit]

A review in the British Medical Journal stated that the work appears mostly aimed at people who are concerned a friend or relative might be in a cult, little exploration of why an individual would join a cult, that there is little analysis of the definition or effectiveness of "exit counselling" that the book recommends, and there is little difference in the outcomes of exit counselling irrespective of whether the person left the cult voluntarily versus being ejected.[2]

A review in the Cultic Studies Journal by Arthur A. Dole summarized the contents of the book and specified that it grew out of study groups connected to the American Family Foundation. Dole continued by criticizing an insufficiently comprehensive of the topic, suggesting gaps regarding topics of prevention programs, rehabilitation, case histories, court cases, how to respond to violent and suicidal groups, specific examples from exit counseling, choice of people to help with exit counseling, ethical principles for exit counseling and the interactions between cults and celebrities, churches, academics, business and the military.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Recovery from Cults, XBK info: A guide to life after leaving the Brahma Kumaris, 2006
  2. ^ Jerram, T (1994). "Book Review: Recovery from Cults". British Medical Journal 308 (6937): 1175. doi:10.1136/bmj.308.6937.1175.  (registration required)
  3. ^ Dole, AA (1993). "Book Review: Recovery from Cults". Cultic Studies Journal 10 (2). 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]