Red-capped tamarin

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Red-capped tamarin
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Family: Callitrichidae
Genus: Saguinus
Species: S. pileatus
Binomial name
Saguinus pileatus
I. Geoffroy and Deville, 1848

The red-capped tamarin, Saguinus pileatus,[1][2] is a primate of the family of marmosets (Callitrichidae), a species of tamarin from South America who was once considered a subspecies of the Saguinus mystax (mystax S. pileatus).[3] They are found in Brazil, on the eastern margin of the Tefé and Coari rivers. They are presumably related to the Moustached tamarin.

Description[edit]

Like all tamarins they are relatively small, growing up to 56 cm long. They have claws instead of nails and their fur is mainly black in color, as it is with feet, hands and tail. The hair is uniformly black, except for the one around the muzzle, being their "mustache", however, smaller than that of the Moustached tamarins. The hair of the head, from the nape to the forehead, has reddish tones almost of a deep burgundy color, which have earned the species their common and scientific names.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Little is known about the habits of these primates. They are presumably similar to the Moustached tamarins. They live in the western Amazon Basin in South America. Their distribution area is located in western Brazil, south of the Amazon River, in the eastern margin of the Tefe and Coari rivers.[1] Their habitat is in rain forests densely covered with undergrowth. They are diurnal and arboreal, living together in small groups led by a dominant female. The females can mate promiscuously with all the males (polyandry), but were also seen cases of polygyny and monogamy. They mainly feed on fruits and insects, but occasionally they also eat eggs and small vertebrates.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 136. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ Rylands AB and Mittermeier RA (2009). Garber PA, Estrada A, Bicca-Marques JC, Heymann EW, Strier KB, ed. South American Primates: Comparative Perspectives in the Study of Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation. Springer. pp. 23–54. ISBN 978-0-387-78704-6. 
  3. ^ Rylands, A. B. & Mittermeier, R. A. (2008). Saguinus mystax ssp. pileatus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 2 January 2009.

Bibliography[edit]

(EN) Rylands et al., Saguinus pileatus in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, Version 2013.2, IUCN, 2013. (EN) Colin Groves in D.E. Wilson e D.M. Reeder, Mammal Species of the World. A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference, 3ª ed., Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005, pp. 136. ISBN 0-8018-8221-4.