Red Man's Greed

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"Red Man's Greed"
South Park episode
Episode no. Season 7
Episode 7
Written by Trey Parker
Production code 707
Original air date April 30, 2003
Guest actors

Alex Glick

Episode chronology
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"Lil' Crime Stoppers"
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List of South Park episodes

"Red Man's Greed" is the seventh episode of the seventh season of the Comedy Central series South Park, first broadcast on April 30, 2003. It is a parody of the Indian removal policies from the 17th century to the 19th century. The episode features Alex Glick, who won a guest voice role in the episode in a contest.[1][2]

Plot[edit]

The boys and their parents go to a Indian casino on a Native American reservation. Kyle's father ends up losing his house betting on blackjack, due to him having a gambling problem. The entire town is bought out by the Native Americans, who plan to tear it down so that they can build a superhighway connecting their casino to Denver. The inhabitants are forced to leave their homes, having no way to buy back their town.

The boys meet with some of the other children in town to come up with an idea. An unfamiliar new boy named Alex points out that they have to save the town. The boys advise their parents to get all the money they have, and then go bet it at the casino. If they win a round of roulette, they would have enough money to buy back the town, plus $50,000. They miraculously win, but as expected from avid gamblers, bet all their winnings again and lose. When they are selling their homes, Stan, Kyle, Cartman, and Kenny try to get them to stand up for the town, as does Alex. Initially the adults say they will move to Middle Park instead, to which the boys say "...until the Native Americans come to take Middle Park too." While the adults remain naive, the four main characters run outside and stand in front of the Native Americans' bulldozers, blocking their path. The townspeople soon join the boys, whilst singing "Love Is a Battlefield" by Pat Benatar. The casino's owner, Chief Runs With Premise, plots another way to get rid of the townspeople.

The Chief decides to give blankets to the townspeople as a peace offering, after infecting the blankets with SARS by rubbing them with naked Chinese men. The whole town gets sick, except for Stan, Stan's father tells Stan he must cure SARS, or only 98% of the town would be left. At the same time, however, the casino owner's son, Premise Running Thin, gets infected with SARS accidentally because he had shared a drink with one of the Chinese men, and none of the Native Americans' herbs are able to cure him. The owner decides to take out his anger on the townspeople with Operation Shock and awe. Stan goes to a wise old man in a trailer in another town, who gives him an "inward journey" brought on by sniffing paint thinner. He discovers the trailer-living white man's way to cure the illness is Campbell's chicken noodle soup, DayQuil, and Sprite, and hands the mixture to the people of South Park, who all recover.

The casino chief arrives and is shocked to find the people are healthy and not half-dead. He begs them for the cure to SARS for his son, offering them a $5 coupon. The chief's wife, enraged at her husband, demands that he give the titles back to the South Park residents, and the chief relents. A new child character notes the lesson that South Park is more than just a town, but a community of people that cannot easily be split up. Stan, visibly irritated at the new kid's presence, asks him who he is, and he responds that he is Alex Glick, a fan who was granted the opportunity to do a guest voice role. Kyle tells him to leave, and Alex does so, breaking the fourth wall to say hello to his family before walking off screen.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions". South Park Studios. June 12, 2009. Retrieved October 29, 2014.
  2. ^ Sam Stall, James Siciliano, Trey Parker, Matt Stone (2010). The South Park Episode Guide Seasons 6-10, Volume 2. Running Press. p 53. Google Books. Retrieved October 29, 2014.

External links[edit]