Reedsport, Oregon

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Reedsport, Oregon
City
Aerial view of western (uptown) Reedsport
Aerial view of western (uptown) Reedsport
Nickname(s): Gateway to the Dunes
Motto: The Chainsaw Carving Capitol of Oregon
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 43°41′56″N 124°6′44″W / 43.69889°N 124.11222°W / 43.69889; -124.11222Coordinates: 43°41′56″N 124°6′44″W / 43.69889°N 124.11222°W / 43.69889; -124.11222
Country United States
State Oregon
County Douglas
Incorporated 1919
Government
 • Mayor Keith Tymchuk
Area[1]
 • Total 2.31 sq mi (5.98 km2)
 • Land 2.05 sq mi (5.31 km2)
 • Water 0.26 sq mi (0.67 km2)
Elevation 10 ft (3.1 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 4,154
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 4,111
 • Density 2,026.3/sq mi (782.4/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP code 97467
Area code(s) 541
FIPS code 41-61300[4]
GNIS feature ID 1148362[5]
Website www.reedsport.or.us

Reedsport is a city in Douglas County, Oregon, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,154.[6]

Gallery[edit]

History[edit]

Reedsport was established on the estuary of the Umpqua River on January 7, 1852. It was named for a local settler, Alfred W. Reed, who founded the city in 1912.[7] The post office was established July 17, 1912.[7]

The building of Southern Pacific Railroad lines extending south to Coos Bay led to the development of Reedsport. Before the post office was established in 1912, Reedsport was a camp for railroad construction workers.

Built on marshy ground, for much of its history Reedsport has struggled with frequent flooding; most of its early buildings were elevated three to eight feet above ground. Following a devastating flood in 1964, a dike was constructed to protect the lower town. During this flood, the waters reached the fish hatchery and overflowed the fish troughs allowing hundreds of thousands of small-mouth bass to be introduced into the Umpqua River.[8] According to fishing reports small-mouth bass became the most abundant fish in the Umpqua River. Every few years, flooding will occur enough that city employees will close these dikes to prevent low-lying areas of the town from flooding.

In the last quarter of the 20th century, Reedsport struggled with the collapse of the Oregon timber industry. In the last two decades, Reedsport has seen an increase of tourism. Part of this is due to its close proximity to the fishing of the Umpqua River. Another part of the recent surge in tourism is due to the sand dunes that are near Reedsport.

Although the U.S. Forest Service maintains a local office in the town, Reedsport's historic connection with the timber industry ended in 1999 with the closing of the International Paper plant in nearby Gardiner.

Recently, Reedsport has seen a rise in tourism due to recreation at the nearby Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area in Winchester Bay. A number of businesses catering to all-terrain vehicles have opened in Reedsport to serve the needs of this growing activity.

Geography and climate[edit]

Reedsport is at the junction of Oregon Route 38 and U.S. Route 101, is 3 miles North of Winchester Bay and 54 miles (87 km) northwest of Roseburg.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.31 square miles (5.98 km2), of which, 2.05 square miles (5.31 km2) is land and 0.26 square miles (0.67 km2) is water.[1]


Climate data for Reedsport, OR (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 51
(11)
54
(12)
55
(13)
58
(14)
62
(17)
66
(19)
69
(21)
70
(21)
69
(21)
64
(18)
54
(12)
51
(11)
60.3
(15.8)
Average low °F (°C) 35
(2)
38
(3)
38
(3)
40
(4)
45
(7)
50
(10)
51
(11)
52
(11)
49
(9)
45
(7)
39
(4)
37
(3)
43.3
(6.2)
Precipitation inches (mm) 9.42
(239.3)
12.64
(321.1)
11.48
(291.6)
7.58
(192.5)
3.10
(78.7)
2.52
(64)
.62
(15.7)
.43
(10.9)
3.66
(93)
6.70
(170.2)
13.10
(332.7)
19.53
(496.1)
90.78
(2,305.8)
Source: [9]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 4,154 people, 1,948 households, and 1,138 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,026.3 inhabitants per square mile (782.4 /km2). There were 2,207 housing units at an average density of 1,076.6 per square mile (415.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.0% White, 0.3% African American, 1.1% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.3% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.9% of the population.

There were 1,948 households of which 20.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.8% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.6% were non-families. 35.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 18% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.68.

The median age in the city was 51.2 years. 17.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 17.8% were from 25 to 44; 29.9% were from 45 to 64; and 27.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.6% male and 50.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 4,378 people, 1,978 households, and 1,265 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,126.6 people per square mile (820.6/km²). There were 2,178 housing units at an average density of 1,057.9 per square mile (408.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.92% White, 0.02% African American, 1.23% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.15% from other races, and 2.22% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.68% of the population.

There were 1,978 households out of which 23.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.0% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.71.

In the city the population was spread out with 20.6% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 19.9% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 26.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $26,054, and the median income for a family was $33,689. Males had a median income of $33,214 versus $20,734 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,093. About 11.7% of families and 16.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.5% of those under age 18 and 10.9% of those age 65 or over.

Museums and other points of interest[edit]

The Oregon Divisional Chainsaw Sculpting Championships was started in 1999 and held every year since 2000 at the Rainbow Plaza over Fathers Day Weekend. Chainsaw Carvers from three continents compete at the event.

The Umpqua Discovery Center, in downtown Reedsport, features local history information provided through interactive media and displays.

The Dean Creek Elk Viewing Area is located three miles (5 km) east of Reedsport on Oregon Route 38. This 1,000-acre (4 km2) preserve jointly managed by the Bureau of Land Management and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife provides an opportunity to view 60-100 Roosevelt elk in their natural habitat year round.

The Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area interpretive center is located at the intersection of Oregon Route 38 and U.S. Route 101. It features interpretive panels, short films, and information about the local area and attractions.

Loon Lake is 15 miles (24 km) southeast of Reedsport.

Education[edit]

Reedsport is served by the two-school Reedsport School District, which includes Highland Elementary School and Reedsport Community Charter School.[10][11]

Media[edit]

Radio[edit]

Newspaper[edit]

Reedsport has one weekly newspaper The Umpqua Post

Renewable energy[edit]

Ocean Power Technologies, a renewable energy company, based in Pennington, New Jersey is developing a commercial wave park on the west coast of the United States located 2.5 miles offshore near Reedsport. The first phase of this project is for ten PB150 PowerBuoys, or 1.5 megawatts.[12] The Reedsport wave farm is now scheduled for installation spring 2013.[13]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

History[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-21. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-21. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census profiles: Oregon cities alphabetically R-S" (PDF). Portland State University Population Research Center. Retrieved November 23, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b McArthur, Lewis A.; McArthur, Lewis L. (2003) [First published 1928]. Oregon Geographic Names (7th ed.). Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society Press. p. 803. ISBN 9780875952772. OCLC 53075956. 
  8. ^ Loon Lake Lodge & RV Resort
  9. ^ http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?or7082
  10. ^ Newman, Lori (2010-02-04). "It's a new day: RHS becomes Reedsport Community Charter School". The Umpqua Post. Retrieved 2010-02-05. 
  11. ^ Nelson, Kristina (2010-02-03). "Local high school gets a new look". KCBY. Retrieved 2010-02-05. 
  12. ^ [1] US catching up with Europe - Forbes October 3, 2012
  13. ^ [2] Reedsport project delayed due to early onset of winter weather - OregonLive Oct 2012

External links[edit]