Regina—Qu'Appelle

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Regina—Qu'Appelle
Flag of Saskatchewan.svg Saskatchewan electoral district
Regina—Qu'Appelle.png
Regina–Qu'Appelle in relation to other Saskatchewan federal electoral districts
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Andrew Scheer
Conservative
District created 1996
First contested 1997
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 71,219
Electors (2011) 48,075
Area (km²)[2] 12,345.76
Pop. density (per km²) 5.8
Census subdivisions Regina, Fort Qu'Appelle, Balgonie, Indian Head, Pilot Butte, White City, Wynyard, Edenwold No. 158

Regina—Qu'Appelle (formerly Qu'Appelle) is a federal electoral district in Saskatchewan, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1904 to 1968 and since 1988.

Geography[edit]

The district includes the northeastern quarter of the city of Regina and the surrounding rural area including the towns of Balgonie, Fort Qu'Appelle, Indian Head, Pilot Butte, White City and Wynyard.

History[edit]

The Qu'Appelle riding was first created in 1903 and covered the Northwest Territories, including what would later be Saskatchewan. In 1905, the district was amended to just cover Saskatchewan.[3]

In 1966, Qu'Appelle riding was abolished when it was redistributed between Qu'Appelle—Moose Mountain, Regina—Lake Centre, Regina East and Assiniboia ridings.[4]

In 1987, Regina–Qu'Appelle was created from parts of the districts of Assiniboia, Humboldt—Lake Centre and Qu'Appelle–Moose Mountain ridings.[5]

The riding was known as Qu'Appelle from 1996 to 1998.[6] In 1998, its name was changed back to Regina–Qu'Appelle.[7]

Members of Parliament[edit]

The riding has elected the following members of the House of Commons:

Parliament Years Member Party
Qu'Appelle
10th  1904 − 1908     Richard Stuart Lake Conservative
11th  1908 − 1911
12th  1911 − 1917     Levi Thomson Liberal
13th  1917 − 1921     Government (Unionist)
14th  1921 − 1925     John Millar Progressive
15th  1925 − 1926
16th  1926 − 1930     Liberal–Progressive
17th  1930 − 1935     Ernest Perley Liberal
18th  1935 − 1940     Conservative
19th  1940 − 1945     National Government
20th  1945 − 1949     Gladys Strum Co-operative Commonwealth
21st  1949 − 1953     Austin Edwin Dewar Liberal
22nd  1953 − 1957     Henry Mang Liberal
23rd  1957 − 1958     Alvin Hamilton Progressive Conservative
24th  1958 − 1962
25th  1962 − 1963
26th  1963 − 1965
27th  1965 − 1968
Riding dissolved into Qu'Appelle—Moose Mountain, Regina—Lake Centre,
Regina East and Assiniboia
Regina—Qu'Appelle
Riding created from Assiniboia, Humboldt—Lake Centre
and Qu'Appelle—Moose Mountain
34th  1988 − 1993     Simon De Jong New Democratic
35th  1993 − 1997
Riding renamed — Qu'Appelle
36th  1997 − 2000     Lorne Nystrom New Democratic
Riding renamed — Regina—Qu'Appelle
37th  2000 − 2004     Lorne Nystrom New Democratic
38th  2004 − 2006     Andrew Scheer Conservative
39th  2006 − 2008
40th  2008 − 2011
41st  2011 − Present

Current member of Parliament[edit]

Its Member of Parliament is Andrew Scheer, a former insurance broker, serving the 41st Canadian Parliament as Speaker of the House of Commons. He was first elected in the 2004 election. He is a member of the Conservative Party of Canada. In the last parliamentary session he served as a member on the 'Standing Committee on Transport' and the 'Standing Committee on Official Languages'.

Election results[edit]

Regina–Qu'Appelle[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Andrew Scheer 15,896 53.5 +1.8 $78,726
New Democratic Fred Clipsham 11,419 38.4 +6.3 $63,800
Liberal Jackie Miller 1,400 4.7 -5.8 $15,991
Green Greg Chatterson 879 3.0 -2.8 $9,100
Independent Jeff Breti 127 0.4 $18,116
Total valid votes/Expense limit 29,721 100.0   $81,793
Total rejected ballots 97 0.3 0.0
Turnout 29,818 61.7 +4
Eligible voters 48,300
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Andrew Scheer 14,068 51.7 +10.4 $78,480
New Democratic Janice Bernier 8,699 32.1 -0.3 $44,446
Liberal Rod Flaman 2,809 10.5 -12.7 $17,222
Green Greg Chatterson 1,556 5.8 +2.5 $8,194
Total valid votes/Expense limit 27,135 100.0   $78,949
Total rejected ballots 81 0.3 0.0
Turnout 27,213 57 -7
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Andrew Scheer 12,753 41.3 +5.5 $71,773
New Democratic Lorne Nystrom 10,041 32.4 -0.3 $50,501
Liberal Allyce Herle 7,134 23.1 -4.7 $68,287
Green Brett Dolter 1,016 3.3 +1.0 $545
Total valid votes 30,944 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 93 0.3 0.0
Turnout 31,037 64 +8
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Andrew Scheer 10,012 35.8 -5.0 $68,776
New Democratic Lorne Nystrom 9,151 32.7 -8.6 $46,290
Liberal Allyce Herle 7,793 27.8 +9.9 $54,913
Green Deanna Robilliard 639 2.3  
Christian Heritage Mary Sylvia Nelson 293 1.0 $4,213
Independent Lorne Edward Widger 106 0.4 $728
Total valid votes 27,994 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 89 0.3 -0.2
Turnout 28,083 56.2 -4.9

Note: Conservative vote is compared to the Canadian Alliance vote in 2000 election.

Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Lorne Nystrom 11,731 41.3 -1.1 $57,492
Alliance Don Leier 11,567 40.7 +13.8 $34,106
Liberal Melvin Isnana 5,106 18.0 -5.8 $41,445
Total valid votes 28,404 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 141 0.5 -0.1
Turnout 28,545 61.1 -1.7

Note: Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.

Qu'Appelle, 1988–2000[edit]

Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Lorne Nystrom 12,269 42.4 +7.9 $59,376
Reform Les Winter 7,784 26.9 +4.4 $55,562
Liberal Don Ross 6,868 23.7 -7.4 $37,643
Progressive Conservative Roy Gaebel 1,633 5.6 -4.4 $13,911
Canadian Action Greg Chatterson 382 1.3  
Total valid votes 28,936 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 143 0.6 +0.1
Turnout 29,079 62.8
Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Simon De Jong 11,178 34.5 -19.4
Liberal Reina Sinclair 10,071 31.1 +16.5
Reform Kerry Gray 7,286 22.5  
Progressive Conservative Tom Hull 3,262 10.1 -21.4
National Jenny Watson 392 1.2  
Canada Party Joseph Thauberger 178 0.5  
Total valid votes 32,367 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes %
New Democratic Simon De Jong 18,608 54.0
Progressive Conservative William Lawrence Hicke 10,854 31.5
Liberal Larry Smith 5,028 14.6
Total valid votes 34,490 100.0

Qu'Appelle, 1904–1968[edit]

Canadian federal election, 1965
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Alvin Hamilton 9,579 57.5 -2.6
Liberal Charlie Lenz 4,033 24.2 -0.1
New Democratic Clif Argue 2,658 16.0 +4.5
Social Credit Wilfred Totten 375 2.3 -1.9
Total valid votes 16,645 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Alvin Hamilton 10,690 60.2 +1.7
Liberal L.L. Prefontaine 4,312 24.3 +0.8
New Democratic Norman Kennedy 2,028 11.4 -0.6
Social Credit Edwin Fredlund 729 4.1 -2.0
Total valid votes 17,759 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1962
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Alvin Hamilton 10,680 58.5 -0.6
Liberal L.L. Prefontaine 4,291 23.5 -1.0
New Democratic Harry E. Richardson 2,188 12.0 -4.5
Social Credit Herman A. Hauser 1,113 6.1  
Total valid votes 18,272 100.0

Note: NDP vote is compared to CCF vote in 1958 election.

Canadian federal election, 1958
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Alvin Hamilton 10,514 59.0 +24.8
Liberal Thomas Kearns 4,357 24.5 -5.9
Co-operative Commonwealth Norman Kennedy 2,941 16.5 -7.1
Total valid votes 17,812 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1957
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Alvin Hamilton 6,217 34.2 +7.1
Liberal Henry Philip Mang 5,512 30.4 -8.1
Co-operative Commonwealth Norman Kennedy 4,279 23.6 -7.3
Social Credit David Isman 2,150 11.8 +8.3
Total valid votes 18,158 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1953
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Henry Philip Mang 6,988 38.5 -6.3
Co-operative Commonwealth Lawrence Irwin Hockley 5,612 30.9 -7.0
Progressive Conservative Alvin Hamilton 4,930 27.1 +9.7
Social Credit Anton Edward Kovatch 644 3.5
Total valid votes 18,174 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1949
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Austin Edwin Dewar 9,017 44.7 +15.1
Co-operative Commonwealth Gladys Strum 7,629 37.8 +0.4
Progressive Conservative Rhys Graham Williams 3,519 17.5 -15.5
Total valid votes 20,165 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1945
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Co-operative Commonwealth Gladys Strum 6,146 37.4  
Progressive Conservative Ernest Edward Perley 5,415 33.0 -21.9
Liberal Gen. Andrew George Latta McNaughton 4,871 29.6 -15.5
Total valid votes 16,432 100.0

Note: Progressive Conservative vote is compared to "National Government" vote in 1940 election. Social Credit vote is compared to New Democracy vote in 1940 election.

Canadian federal election, 1940
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
National Government Ernest Edward Perley 8,236 54.9 +18.2
Liberal James Alexander McCowan 6,775 45.1 +9.7
Total valid votes 15,011 100.0

Note: "National Government" vote is compared to Conservative vote in 1935 election.

Canadian federal election, 1935
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Ernest Edward Perley 5,769 36.6  
Liberal James Alexander McCowan 5,579 35.4 -17.9
Co-operative Commonwealth John Frederick Herman 2,210 14.0  
Social Credit Joseph Alois Thauberger 2,186 13.9  
Total valid votes 15,744 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1930
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Ernest Edward Perley 7,888 53.3  
Liberal–Progressive John Millar 6,905 46.7 -10.2
Total valid votes 14,793 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1926
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal–Progressive John Millar 7,778 56.9 +3.5
Conservative William Wallace Lynd 5,891 43.1 -3.5
Total valid votes 13,669 100.0

Note: Liberal-Progressive vote is compared to Progressive vote in 1925 election.

Canadian federal election, 1925
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive John Millar 5,272 53.4 -15.9
Conservative William Wallace Lynd 4,600 46.6 +15.9
Total valid votes 9,872 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1921
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive John Millar 8,350 69.3
Conservative Ernest Edward Perley 3,705 30.7
Total valid votes 12,055 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1917
Party Candidate Votes
Government (Unionist) Levi Thomson acclaimed
Canadian federal election, 1911
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Levi Thomson 4,298 52.6 +2.9
Conservative Richard Stuart Lake 3,874 47.4 -2.9
Total valid votes 8,172 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1908
Party Candidate Votes %
Conservative Richard Stuart Lake 3,833 50.3
Liberal J.T. Brown 3,781 49.7
Total valid votes 7,614 100.0

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Stastistics Canada: 2012
  2. ^ Stastistics Canada: 2012
  3. ^ "QU'APPELLE, Saskatchewan (1905 - 1966)". History of Federal Ridings since 1867. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  4. ^ "QU'APPELLE--MOOSE MOUNTAIN, Saskatchewan (1966 - 1987)". History of Federal Ridings since 1867. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  5. ^ "REGINA--QU'APPELLE, Saskatchewan (1987 - 1996)". History of Federal Ridings since 1867. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  6. ^ "QU'APPELLE, Saskatchewan (1996 - 1998)". History of Federal Ridings since 1867. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  7. ^ "REGINA--QU'APPELLE, Saskatchewan (1998 - )". History of Federal Ridings since 1867. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 

External links[edit]