Reginald Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher

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Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher

Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher GCVO, KCB, PC, DL (30 June 1852 – 22 January 1930) was a historian and Liberal politician in the United Kingdom, although his period of greatest influence over military and foreign affairs was as a courtier, member of public committees and behind-the-scenes "fixer".

Background and education[edit]

Reginald, known as Regy, Brett was the son of William Baliol Brett, 1st Viscount Esher and Eugénie Mayer (1814–1904).[1] Born in London, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. He held a militia commission after Cambridge.[2][3] His father was Solicitor-General in the Derby-Russell ministry. He distinguished himself in the 1867 Reform Act debate dutifully supporting the triumphant Disraeli. Balliol Brett was an expert on northern politics, being Yorkshire born and bred. For many years her was MP for Bradford. In 1876 he was a Lord Justice, and Salisbury later elevated a Baron and raised to the bench. A distinguished common law judge, he was Master of Rolls for 1897, when created first Viscount Esher. His mother was a jewess French émigré, who arrived in England, after being expelled for supporting Bonaparte. A refugee she was adopted by Colonel John Gurwood. She was the famous jejeune captivated in Disraeli's novel Conningsby. They met at the romantic bohemian Tory set in Longleat House and Countess Blessington.

At Eton Brett was taught by the influential William Johnson, whose pupils included Rosebery and those in the highest echelons of society. Rosebery idealistic learning from romantic poets Wordsworth and Coleridge, the liberal philosopher J S Mill, the chemistry of Leibnig, music of Mozart, and Jeremy Bentham. Going up to Trinity College, Oxford, Brett was profoundly influenced by William Harcourt the radical lawyer, politician and Professor of International Law. Harcourt controlled Brett's rooms, and lifestyle at Oxford. Brett's father had introduced to Albert Grey's Committee, but had a long-standing dispute with General Charles Grey, the Queen's Equerry. Brett was admitted to the Society of Apostles, dedicated to emergent philosophies of European atheism. Their number included the aristocratic literati of liberalism Frank, Gerald and Eustace Balfour, Frederick and Arthur Myers, Hallam and Lionel Tennyson, Edmund Gurney, S H and J G Butcher. Brett experimented approaching High Mass from Cardinal Newman on Sundays in London. The Oxford Movement included historians J Sedgwick and F M Maitland. He knew science fiction writers ALdous Huuxley and W T Clifford.

Brett was seen with the Carlton Gardens set of Lady Granville, he was friends of the Clare brothers, introduced by the Earl de Grey. He visited Howick Park, and took law with Lord Brougham of Vaux. The famous lawyer's lectures coincided with Justice Brett employment with Richard Cross, as a parliamentary re-drafter at the Home Office. Albert Grey ushered provided an invitation to the India Office and entrée to met Sir Bartle Frere, the colonial administrator. When Disraeli tried to enforce Anglicanism, in the Public Worship Bill, and was defeated, Brett wrote copious letters to Hartington, leader of the Whigs in the Lords. The consequences were to push Harcourt into the limelight as liberal leader in the Commons. But moderates tended to be dragged into sharing a religious position with the Disraelian tradition threatening to split English liberalism. He visited the actor's daughter Lady Waldegrave at Strawberry Hill confirming a lettered art. Rejecting untidy ritualism preferred by Gladstone, he took deportment lessons from the Duchess of Manchester at Kimbolton. She was Hartington's private secretary, stamping his credentials as a rich aesthete.

Courtier, diplomat and Liberal MP[edit]

The Eastern Question of 1878 had crushed Russia despotism, and released the ramshackle bohemian Sultanate in cosmopolitan Istanbul from the threat of invasion. But the success of the Midlothian Campaign, re-energized Gladstone's authority as rightful leader of his party; casting Hartington and Brett as marginalized jingos. Six years later the Whigs would be pushed into the unionist camp. Brett needed his vanity satisfied but felt uncomfortable in neither party. He rose to become the mediator between aristocratic factions, and was a leading light at the Imperial Round Table Conference in 1887.

Having been a Conservative supporter as a young man, Brett began his political career in 1880, as Liberal Member of Parliament for Penryn and Falmouth. He was Parliamentary Private Secretary to Lord Hartington (Secretary of State for War 1882-5) and once drove him to a Cabinet meeting on a sleigh through the snow.[2] However he elected to withdraw from public politics in 1885, after losing an election at Plymouth, in favour of a behind the scenes role. He was instrumental in the Jameson raid of 1895 defending the imperialist Cecil Rhodes.

In 1895, he became Permanent Secretary to the Office of Works, where the Prince of Wales was impressed by his dedication to the elderly Queen Victoria.[2] Upon his father's death on 24 May 1899, he succeeded him as Viscount Esher.

Brett in 1880

In 1901, Lord Esher was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of Berkshire[4] and became Deputy Governor and Constable of Windsor Castle,[5] and remained close to the royal family until his death. By the end of 1903 Esher was meeting or corresponding with King Edward VII every day.[2] He lived at 'Orchard Lea' at Winkfield on the edge of the Great Park. During this period, he helped edit Queen Victoria's papers, publishing a work called Correspondence of Queen Victoria (1907).

From 1903 Esher shunned office, but was a member of Lord Elgin's South African War Commission,[6] which investigated Britain's near-failure in the Boer War. At this time he was writing to the King daily (and having three or four meetings a day with the King’s adviser Knollys), informing him of the views of the Commission, of party leaders, and war office civil servants with whom he was still in touch from his days working for Hartington. St John Brodrick, Secretary of State for War, was resentful of Esher’s influence.[2]

Behind the scenes, he influenced many pre-World War I military reforms and was a supporter of the BritishFrench Entente Cordiale. He chaired the War Office Reconstitution Committee.[6] This recommended radical reform of the British Army, including the setting up of the Army Council, and established the Committee of Imperial Defence permanent (Esher joined that body in 1905). From 1904 all War Office appointments were approved and often suggested by Esher. He approved the setting up of the Territorial Army, although he saw it as a step towards conscription; a step not taken as the Conscription acts became mandatory. Many of Esher’s recommendations were nonetheless, implemented under the new Liberal governments of Henry Campbell-Bannerman and Herbert Henry Asquith by Haldane, Secretary of State for War, assisted by Esher's protege the young Major-General Douglas Haig.[2]

Esher was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of the County of London in 1909.[7] and the King's Aide-de-Camp. Esher was an able administrator, and a silky, smooth influence as a courtier, and supporter for the monarch. Moreover the King liked Esher, as his influence over the Army grew, leading to a more liberal far-sighted attitude towards the possibility of conflict in Europe. Esher's invaluable contribution prevented further promotion in a political career, in which he had been destined for high cabinet office. Esher's close political friends in the Liberal party included Edward Marjoribanks, Viscount Tweedsmuir and Earl Rosebery. Huis aristocratic connections and military experience made him an ideal grandee, but such was the importance of his ties to the monarch, that his career was somewhat restrictive of ambition. He was by nature ambitious, 'clubbable' sociable, and frequently seen at High Society parties in the fashionable houses of the Edwardian era.

In 1911 Esher helped ease out Knollys, who was then 75 having been in the Royal Household since 1862, but who had lost some Royal confidence over the negotiation of the Parliament Act, and arrange his replacement as King George V's principal adviser with Arthur Bigge, Lord Stamfordham.[2]

Esher declined many public offices, including the Viceroyalty of India and the Secretaryship for War, a job to which King Edward VII had urged he be appointed.[2]

During the First World War Esher was, in one writer’s description, de facto head of British Intelligence in France, reporting on the French domestic and political situation, although told his son he preferred not to have a formal position where he would have to take orders.[2]

Esher was admitted to the Privy Council in 1922. In 1928 he became Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle, an office he held until his death in 1930.

Historian[edit]

Lord Esher was also a historian; besides the aforementioned work, he also published works on King Edward VII and Lord Kitchener. Together with Liberal MP Lewis ("Loulou") Harcourt he established the London Museum, which opened its doors on 5 March 1912.[8]

Family[edit]

In 1879, Reginald Brett married Eleanor Van de Weyer, daughter of Belgian ambassador Sylvain Van de Weyer and granddaughter of Anglo-American financier Joshua Bates. They had four children.

Although married with children, Esher had homosexual inclinations, but his flirtations with young men were regarded with tolerant amusement in polite society.[2] He was evidently sufficiently discreet to avoid becoming entangled in the Cleveland Street Scandal, unlike his friend Lord Arthur Somerset.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hedley (2004)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Reid 2006, pp127-31
  3. ^ "Brett, Reginald Baliol (BRT870RB)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  4. ^ The London Gazette: no. 27281. p. 766. 5 February 1901.
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 27336. p. 4838. 23 July 1901.
  6. ^ a b "The Papers of Viscount Esher (Reginald Brett)". Janus. Cambridge University. 
  7. ^ The London Gazette: no. 28255. p. 4062. 28 May 1909.
  8. ^ Bailkin, Jordanna "Radical Conservations: The Problem with the London Museum" Radical History Review - Issue 84, Fall 2002, pp. 43–7
  • Lees-Milne, James (1986). The Enigmatic Edwardian: The Life of Reginald, 2nd Viscount Esher. London: Sidgwick & Jackson.
  • Reid, Walter. Architect of Victory: Douglas Haig (Birlinn Ltd, Edinburgh, 2006.) ISBN 1-84158-517-3

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Henry Thomas Cole
David James Jenkins
Member of Parliament for Penryn and Falmouth
18801885
With: David James Jenkins
Succeeded by
David James Jenkins
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Marquess of Cambridge
Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle
1928–1930
Succeeded by
The Earl of Athlone
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
William Brett
Viscount Esher
1899–1930
Succeeded by
Oliver Brett