Registered partnership in Switzerland

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Legal recognition of
same-sex relationships
Marriage
Recognized
  1. Can be registered also in Aruba, Curaçao and Sint Maarten
  2. When performed in Mexican states that have legalized same-sex marriage

Commencement dates:
  1. To be determined
  2. June 1, 2014 for statewide
LGBT portal

Switzerland has allowed registered partnerships for same-sex couples since 1 January 2007.

Registered partnerships[edit]

Laws regarding same-sex partnerships in Europe
  Other type of partnership
  Unregistered cohabitation
  Unrecognized
  Constitution limits marriage to opposite-sex couples

In a nationwide referendum on 5 June 2005, the Swiss people approved by 58% a registered partnership law, granting same-sex couples the same rights and protections as opposite-sex couples, except:

  • adoption of children
  • fertility treatments
  • facilitated Swiss naturalisation of the foreign partner to a Swiss citizen partner after 6 years of partnership abroad, unlike with a conventional marriage.

However, in terms of next of kin status, taxation, social security, insurance, and shared possession of a dwelling, same-sex couples are granted the same rights as married couples.

The official title of the same-sex union is "Eingetragene Partnerschaft" in German, "Partenariat enregistré" in French, "Associazione registrata" in Italian and "Partenadi Registrà" in Rumantsch Grischun meaning "registered partnership".[1] The bill was passed by the National Council, 111 to 72, on 3 December 2003 and by the Council of States on 3 June 2004, with minor changes.[2][3] The National Council approved it again on 10 June but the conservative Federal Democratic Union collected signatures to force a referendum.[4][5] Subsequently the Swiss people voted on 5 June 2005 with 58% in favor of the bill. The law came into effect on 1 January 2007.[6]

Same-sex marriages formed outside Switzerland will be recognised as registered partnerships within Switzerland. Switzerland was the first nation to pass a same-sex union law by referendum.

Canton laws[edit]

The Canton of Geneva has had a partnership law on cantonal level since 2001. It grants unmarried couples, whether same-sex or opposite-sex, many rights, responsibilities and protections that married couples have. However, it does not allow benefits in taxation, social security, or health insurance premiums (unlike the federal law). The origin of the law lies in the French Civil solidarity pact law.[7][8][9][10]

On 22 September 2002, the canton of Zurich passed a same-sex partnership law by referendum that goes further than Geneva's law, but requires couples to live together for six months before registering.[11]

In July 2004, the canton of Neuchâtel passed a law recognizing unmarried couples.[12][13]

Same-sex marriage[edit]

Discussions about allowing same-sex marriage are beginning in Switzerland and some politicians from the Social Democratic Party, the Greens and the Liberals support it.

The Green Party supports same-sex marriage, according to its 2007 electoral manifesto.[14]

In December 2013, the Green Liberal Party introduced the bill legalising same-sex marriage.[15]

Public opinion[edit]

According to the Ifop poll, conducted in May 2013, 63% of Swiss supported allowing same-sex couples to marry and adopt children.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]